Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 548355
Title Gold nanoparticles embedded in a polymer as a 3D-printable dichroic nanocomposite material
Author(s) Kool, Lars; Bunschoten, Anton; Velders, Aldrik H.; Saggiomo, Vittorio
Source Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology 10 (2019)1. - ISSN 2190-4286 - p. 442 - 447.
DOI https://doi.org/10.3762/bjnano.10.43
Department(s) Laboratory of Molecular Biology
BioNanoTechnology
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) 3D printing - Dichroism - Gold nanoparticles - Nanocomposite
Abstract

Background: Nanotechnology, even if unknowingly, has been used for millennia. The occurrence of shiny colors in pottery and glass made hundreds and thousand of years ago is due to the presence of nanoparticles in the fabrication of such ornaments. In the last decade, 3D printing has revolutionized fabrication and manufacturing processes, making it easier to produce, in a simple and fast way, 3D objects. Results: In this paper we show how to fabricate a 3D-printable nanocomposite composed of dichroic gold nanoparticles and a 3D-printable polymer. The minute amount of gold nanoparticles used for obtaining the dichroic effect does not influence the mechanical properties of the polymer nor its printability. Thus, the nanocomposite can be easily 3D-printed using a standard 3D printer and shows a purple color in transmission and a brownish color in reflection. Conclusion: This methodology can be used not only by artists, but also for studying the optical properties of nanoparticles or, for example, for the 3D fabrication of optical filters.

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