Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 549131
Title Frontiers in data analytics for adaptation research: Topic modeling
Author(s) Lesnikowski, Alexandra; Belfer, Ella; Rodman, Emma; Smith, Julie; Biesbroek, Robbert; Wilkerson, John D.; Ford, James D.; Berrang-Ford, Lea
Source Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change 10 (2019)3. - ISSN 1757-7780
DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.576
Department(s) WIMEK
WASS
Public Administration and Policy
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) climate change adaptation - governance - policy - quantitative text analysis - topic models
Abstract

Rapid growth over the past two decades in digitized textual information represents untapped potential for methodological innovations in the adaptation governance literature that draw on machine learning approaches already being applied in other areas of computational social sciences. This Focus Article explores the potential for text mining techniques, specifically topic modeling, to leverage this data for large-scale analysis of the content of adaptation policy documents. We provide an overview of the assumptions and procedures that underlie the use of topic modeling, and discuss key areas in the adaptation governance literature where topic modeling could provide valuable insights. We demonstrate the diversity of potential applications for topic modeling with two examples that examine: (a) how adaptation is being talked about by political leaders in United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; and (b) how adaptation is being discussed by decision-makers and public administrators in Canadian municipalities using documents collected from 25 city council archives. This article is categorized under: Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate Change > Institutions for Adaptation.

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