Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 549488
Title Africa’s Secessionism: A Breakdance of Aspiration, Grievance, Performance, and Disenchantment
Author(s) Schomerus, Mareike; Englebert, Pierre; Vries, L. de
Source In: Secessionism in African Politics / de Vries, Lotje, Englebert, Pierre, Schomerus, Mareike, Palgrave Macmillan (Palgrave Series in African Borderlands Studies ) - ISBN 9783319902050 - p. 1 - 20.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-90206-7_1
Department(s) Sociology of Development and Change
WASS
Publication type Peer reviewed book chapter
Publication year 2019
Abstract This chapter offers four interpretations of Africa’s secessionism: aspiration, grievance, performance, and disenchantment. Secessionism remains a fundamental theme of African politics, despite being largely removed from the realm of the thinkable. Yet, South Sudan’s independence against all odds shows that African secessionism is also contradictory. Its aspirational simplicity obscures a complex political phenomenon that often couples a territorial demand with invocations of the right to self-determination. Claims are based on grievances, marginalization, narratives, and economic interests. The consequences of such claims vary; the two cases of successful post-colonial secession highlight that secessionism does not guarantee improvements. And secessionist claims rarely challenge the notion that the sovereign territorial state is the answer to Africans’ problems rather than one of its roots.
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