Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 549588
Title Association between Psychosocial Stress and Fecal Microbiota in Pregnant Women
Author(s) Hechler, C.; Borewicz, K.; Beijers, R.; Saccenti, E.; Riksen-Walraven, M.; Smidt, H.; Weerth, C. de
Source Scientific Reports 9 (2019)1. - ISSN 2045-2322
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-40434-8
Department(s) Microbiology
VLAG
Systems and Synthetic Biology
MolEco
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Abstract

Maternal prenatal psychosocial stress is associated with altered child emotional and behavioral development. One potential underlying mechanism is that prenatal psychosocial stress affects child outcomes via the mother's, and in turn the child's, intestinal microbiota. This study investigates the first step of this mechanism: the relation between psychosocial stress and fecal microbiota in pregnant mothers. Mothers (N = 70) provided a late pregnancy stool sample and filled in questionnaires on general and pregnancy-specific stress and anxiety. Bacterial DNA was extracted and analysed by Illumina HiSeq sequencing of PCR-amplified 16 S ribosomal RNA gene fragments. Associations between maternal general anxiety and microbial composition were found. No associations between the other measured psychosocial stress variables and the relative abundance of microbial groups were detected. This study shows associations between maternal pregnancy general anxiety and microbial composition, providing first evidence of a mechanism through which psychological symptoms in pregnancy may affect the offspring.

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