Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 549724
Title Breeders that receive help age more slowly in a cooperatively breeding bird
Author(s) Hammers, Martijn; Kingma, Sjouke A.; Spurgin, Lewis G.; Bebbington, Kat; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Burke, Terry; Komdeur, Jan; Richardson, David S.
Source Nature Communications 10 (2019)1. - ISSN 2041-1723
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-09229-3
Department(s) Behavioral Ecology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Abstract

Helping by group members is predicted to lead to delayed senescence by affecting the trade-off between current reproduction and future survival for dominant breeders. Here we investigate this prediction in the Seychelles warbler, Acrocephalus sechellensis, in which mainly female subordinate helpers (both co-breeders and non-breeding helpers) often help dominants raise offspring. We find that the late-life decline in survival usually observed in this species is greatly reduced in female dominants when a helper is present. Female dominants with a female helper show reduced telomere attrition, a measure that reflects biological ageing in this and other species. Finally, the probability of having female, but not male, helpers increases with dominant female age. Our results suggest that delayed senescence is a key benefit of cooperative breeding for elderly dominants and support the idea that sociality and delayed senescence are positively self-reinforcing. Such an effect may help explain why social species often have longer lifespans.

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