Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 550161
Title Discovery of Salmonella trehalose phospholipids reveals functional convergence with mycobacteria
Author(s) Reinink, Peter; Buter, Jeffrey; Mishra, Vivek K.; Ishikawa, Eri; Cheng, Tan Yun; Willemsen, Peter T.J.; Porwollik, Steffen; Brennan, Patrick J.; Heinz, Eva; Mayfield, Jacob A.; Dougan, Gordon; Els, Cécile A. van; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Napolitani, Giorgio; Yamasaki, Sho; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; McClelland, Michael; Moody, D.B.; Rhijn, Ildiko Van
Source Journal of Experimental Medicine 216 (2019)4. - ISSN 0022-1007 - p. 757 - 771.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1084/jem.20181812
Department(s) Infection Biology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Abstract

Salmonella species are among the world's most prevalent pathogens. Because the cell wall interfaces with the host, we designed a lipidomics approach to reveal pathogen-specific cell wall compounds. Among the molecules differentially expressed between Salmonella Paratyphi and S. Typhi, we focused on lipids that are enriched in S. Typhi, because it causes typhoid fever. We discovered a previously unknown family of trehalose phospholipids, 6,6'-diphosphatidyltrehalose (diPT) and 6-phosphatidyltrehalose (PT). Cardiolipin synthase B (ClsB) is essential for PT and diPT but not for cardiolipin biosynthesis. Chemotyping outperformed clsB homology analysis in evaluating synthesis of diPT. DiPT is restricted to a subset of Gram-negative bacteria: large amounts are produced by S. Typhi, lower amounts by other pathogens, and variable amounts by Escherichia coli strains. DiPT activates Mincle, a macrophage activating receptor that also recognizes mycobacterial cord factor (6,6'-trehalose dimycolate). Thus, Gram-negative bacteria show convergent function with mycobacteria. Overall, we discovered a previously unknown immunostimulant that is selectively expressed among medically important bacterial species.

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