Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 550851
Title Success of lake restoration depends on spatial aspects of nutrient loading and hydrology
Author(s) Janssen, Annette B.G.; Wijk, Dianneke van; Gerven, Luuk P.A. van; Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Brederveld, Robert J.; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Janse, Jan H.; Mooij, Wolf M.
Source Science of the Total Environment 679 (2019). - ISSN 0048-9697 - p. 248 - 259.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.443
Department(s) Water Systems and Global Change
WIMEK
Sustainable Soil Use
GTB Teelt & Gewasfysiologie
PE&RC
Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) Alternative stable states - Diffuse source - Management - PCLake - Point source - Spatial heterogeneity
Abstract

Many aquatic ecosystems have deteriorated due to human activities and their restoration is often troublesome. It is proposed here that the restoration success of deteriorated lakes critically depends on hitherto largely neglected spatial heterogeneity in nutrient loading and hydrology. A modelling approach is used to study this hypothesis by considering four lake types with contrasting nutrient loading (point versus diffuse)and hydrology (seepage versus drainage). By comparing the longterm effect of common restoration measures (nutrient load reduction, lake flushing or biomanipulation)in these four lake types, we found that restoration through reduction of nutrient loading is effective in all cases. In contrast, biomanipulation only works in seepage lakes with diffuse nutrient inputs, while lake flushing will even be counterproductive in lakes with nutrient point sources. The main conclusion of the presented analysis is that a priori assessment of spatial heterogeneity caused by nutrient loading and hydrology is essential for successful restoration of lake ecosystems.

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