Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 551913
Title Belowground consequences of intracontinental range-expanding plants and related natives in novel environments
Author(s) Manrubia, Marta; Snoek, L.B.; Weser, Carolin; Veen, G.F.; Putten, Wim H. Van Der
Source Frontiers in Microbiology 10 (2019)MAR. - ISSN 1664-302X
DOI https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2019.00505
Department(s) Laboratory of Nematology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) Ecological novelty - Habitat novelty - Phylogenetic distance - Plant range expansion - Rhizosphere community assembly
Abstract

Introduced exotic plant species that originate from other continents are known to alter soil microbial community composition and nutrient cycling. Plant species that expand range to higher latitudes and altitudes as a consequence of current climate warming might as well affect the composition and functioning of native soil communities in their new range. However, the functional consequences of plant origin have been poorly studied in the case of plant range shifts. Here, we determined rhizosphere bacterial communities of four intracontinental range-expanding plant species in comparison with their four congeneric natives grown in soils collected from underneath those plant species in the field and in soils that are novel to them. We show that, when controlling for both species relatedness and soil characteristics, range-expanding plant species in higher latitude ecosystems will influence soil bacterial community composition and nutrient cycling in a manner similar to congeneric related native species. Our results highlight the importance to include phylogenetically controlled comparisons to disentangle the effect of origin from the effect of contrasting plant traits in the context of exotic plant species.

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