Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 552545
Title Replacing Part of Glucose with Galactose in the Postweaning Diet Protects Female But Not Male Mice from High-Fat Diet-Induced Adiposity in Later Life
Author(s) Bouwman, Lianne M.S.; Fernández-Calleja, José M.S.; Stelt, Inge van der; Oosting, Annemarie; Keijer, Jaap; Schothorst, Evert M. van
Source The Journal of Nutrition 149 (2019)7. - ISSN 0022-3166 - p. 1140 - 1148.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxz028
Department(s) Human and Animal Physiology
BU Toxicology, Novel Foods & Agrochains
WIAS
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) adipose tissue - galactose - insulin signaling - lactose - postweaning - programming
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Duration of breastfeeding is positively associated with decreased adiposity and increased metabolic health in later life, which might be related to galactose. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate if partial replacement of glucose with galactose in the postweaning diet had a metabolic programming effect. METHODS: Male and female mice (C57BL/6JRccHsd) received an isocaloric diet (16 energy% fat; 64 energy% carbohydrates; 20 energy% protein) with either glucose (32 energy%) (GLU) or glucose + galactose (GLU + GAL, 16 energy% each) for 3 wk postweaning. Afterwards, all mice were switched to the same 40 energy% high-fat diet (HFD) for 9 wk to evaluate potential programming effects in an obesogenic environment. Data were analyzed within sex. RESULTS: Female body weight (-14%) and fat mass (-47%) were significantly lower at the end of the HFD period (both P < 0.001) among those fed GLU + GAL than among those fed GLU; effects in males were in line with these findings but nonsignificant. Food intake was affected in GLU + GAL-fed females (+8% on postweaning diet, -9% on HFD) compared with GLU-fed females, but not for hypothalamic transcript levels at endpoint. Also, in GLU + GAL-fed females, serum insulin concentrations (-48%, P < 0.05) and the associated homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were significantly lower ( P < 0.05) at endpoint, but there were no changes in pancreas morphology. In GLU + GAL-fed females, expression of insulin receptor substrate 2 (Irs2) (-27%, P < 0.01 ; -44%, P < 0.001) and the adipocyte size markers leptin (Lep) (-40%, P < 0.05; -63% , P < 0.05) and mesoderm-specific transcript homolog protein (Mest) (-80%, P < 0.05; -72%, P < 0.05) was lower in gonadal and subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT), respectively. Expression of insulin receptor substrate1 (Irs1) (-24%, P < 0.05) was only lower in subcutaneous WAT in GLU + GAL-fed females. CONCLUSIONS: Partial replacement of glucose with galactose, resulting in a 1:1 ratio mimicking lactose, in a 3-wk postweaning diet lowered body weight, adiposity, HOMA-IR, and expression of WAT insulin signaling in HFD-challenged female mice in later life. This suggests that prolonged galactose intake may improve metabolic and overall health in later life.

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