Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 552744
Title Short-term, but not long-term, increased daytime workload leads to decreased night-time energetics in a free-living song bird
Author(s) Visser, Marcel E.; Dooremalen, Coby van; Tomotani, Barbara M.; Bushuev, Andrey; Meijer, Harro A.J.; Marvelde, Luc Te; Gienapp, Phillip
Source Journal of Experimental Biology 222 (2019). - ISSN 0022-0949
DOI https://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.199513
Department(s) Animal Breeding and Genomics
PE&RC
Biointeractions and Plant Health
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Availibility Full text available from 2020-07-19
Keyword(s) Basal metabolic rate - Compensation hypothesis - Daily energy expenditure - Feeding frequency - Ficedula hypoleuca - Increased-intake hypothesis
Abstract

Reproduction is energetically expensive and to obtain sufficient energy, animals can either alter their metabolic system over time to increase energy intake (increased-intake hypothesis) or reallocate energy from maintenance processes (compensation hypothesis). The first hypothesis predicts a positive relationship between basal metabolic rate (BMR) and energy expenditure (DEE) because of the higher energy demands of the metabolic system at rest. The second hypothesis predicts a trade-off between different body functions, with a reduction of the BMR as a way to compensate for increased daytime energetic expenditure. We experimentally manipulated the workload of wild pied flycatchers by adding or removing chicks when chicks were 2 and 11 days old. We then measured the feeding frequency (FF), DEE and BMR at day 11, allowing us to assess both short- and long-term effects of increased workload. The manipulation at day 2 caused an increase in FF when broods were enlarged, but no response in DEE or BMR, while the manipulation at day 11 caused an increase in FF, no change in DEE and a decrease in BMR in birds with more chicks. Our results suggest that pied flycatchers adjust their workload but that this does not lead to a higher BMR at night (no support for the increased-intake hypothesis). In the short term, we found that birds reallocate energy with a consequent reduction of BMR (evidence for the compensation hypothesis). Birds thus resort to short-term strategies to increase energy expenditure, which could explain why energy expenditure and hard work are not always correlated in birds.

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