Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 552755
Title Microbial communities in a dynamic in vitro model for the human ileum resemble the human ileal microbiota
Author(s) Stolaki, Maria; Minekus, Mans; Venema, Koen; Lahti, Leo; Smid, Eddy J.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Zoetendal, Erwin G.
Source FEMS microbiology ecology 95 (2019)8. - ISSN 0168-6496
DOI https://doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiz096
Department(s) Microbiology
VLAG
Food Microbiology
WIAS
Host-Microbe Interactomics
MolEco
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) in vitro model - gut health - ileum - microbial diversity - microbiota - short chain fatty acids
Abstract

The important role for the human small intestinal microbiota in health and disease has been widely acknowledged. However, the difficulties encountered in accessing the small intestine in a non-invasive way in healthy subjects have limited the possibilities to study its microbiota. In this study, a dynamic in vitro model that simulates the human ileum was developed, including its microbiota. Ileostomy effluent and fecal inocula were employed to cultivate microbial communities within the in vitro model. Microbial stability was repetitively achieved after 10 days of model operation with bacterial concentrations reaching on average 107 to 108 16S rRNA copy numbers/ml. High diversities similar to those observed in in vivo ileum samples were achieved at steady state using both fecal and ileostomy effluent inocula. Functional stability based on Short Chain Fatty Acid concentrations was reached after 10 days of operation using fecal inocula, but was not reached with ileostomy effluent as inoculum. Principal Components and cluster analysis of the phylogenetic profiles revealed that in vitro samples at steady state clustered closest to two samples obtained from the terminal ileum of healthy individuals, independent of the inoculum used, demonstrating that the in vitro microbiota at steady state resembles that of the human ileum.

Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.