Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 552829
Title The role of self-control and the presence of enactment models on sugar-sweetened beverage consumption: A pilot study
Author(s) Wenzel, Mario; Geelen, Anouk; Wolters, Maike; Hebestreit, Antje; Laerhoven, Kristof Van; Lakerveld, Jeroen; Andersen, Lene Frost; van't Veer, Pieter; Kubiak, Thomas
Source Frontiers in Psychology 10 (2019). - ISSN 1664-1078
DOI https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01511
Department(s) Vlag A
VLAG
Nutrition and Disease
Global Nutrition
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) Diet - Ecological momentary assessment - Self-control - Social norms - Sugar-sweetened beverages
Abstract

The objective of the present research was to investigate associations of dispositional and momentary self-control and the presence of other individuals consuming SSBs with the consumption frequency of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) in a multi-country pilot study. We conducted an Ambulatory Assessment in which 75 university students (52 females) from four study sites carried smartphones and received prompts six times a day in their everyday environments to capture information regarding momentary self-control and the presence of other individuals consuming SSBs. Multilevel models revealed a statistically significant negative association between dispositional self-control and SSB consumption. Moreover, having more self-control than usual was only beneficial in regard to lower SSB consumption frequency, when other individuals consuming SSBs were not present but not when they were present. The findings support the hypothesis that self-control is an important factor regarding SSB consumption. This early evidence highlights self-control as a candidate to design interventions to promote healthier drinking through improved self-control.

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