Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 552991
Title Effect of marine snow on microbial oil degradation
Author(s) Langenhoff, A.A.M.; Rahsepar, Shokouh; Eenennaam, J.S. van; Radović, Jagoš R.; Oldenburg, Thomas B.P.; Foekema, E.M.; Murk, A.J.
Source In: Deep Oil Spills / Murawski, S.A., Ainsworth, C.H., Gilbert, S., Hollander, D.J., Paris, C.B., Schlueter, M., Wetzel, D.L., - p. 301 - 311.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11605-7_18
Department(s) WIMEK
Environmental Technology
Wageningen University & Research
Onderz. Form. D.
Marine Animal Ecology
Publication type Peer reviewed book chapter
Publication year 2019
Abstract In the aftermath of an oil spill, a possible response is the addition of chemical dispersants to prevent further spreading of the spilled oil on the ocean surface. The main objective is to enhance the formation of smaller oil droplets by reducing the interfacial tension between oil and water, thus dispersing the oil into the water column. The resulting solubilized oil with microdroplets along with the associated toxic compounds will be swiftly incorporated into the seawater. The formation of smaller oil droplets and the dispersant enhanced solubilized oil will increase its availability for bacteria and thus the biodegradability. Subsequently, the number and activity of oil-degrading bacteria increases, and more oil will be degraded in a shorter period of time (Kessler et al., Science 331:312–315, 2011). However, during the immediate release of the dispersed oil, volatile hydrocarbons including some of the more toxic compounds of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) can inhibit the oil degradation (Sherry et al., Front Microbiol 5:131, 2014).
Depending on the oceanic conditions, the addition of chemical dispersants can result in excessive formation of marine snow. It has been shown that the application of dispersants during phytoplankton blooms can trigger the formation of marine snow to which the sticky dispersed oil can bind. In the presence of mineral particles, oiled snow complexes are being formed that become negatively buoyant and sink to the ocean floor. As a result, oiled marine snow accumulates on the ocean floor where biodegradation is inhibited due to oxygen depletion.
The abovementioned two mechanisms of inhibition of oil biodegradation upon application of oil spill dispersants will be discussed in this chapter.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.