Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 553243
Title What makes a volatile organic compound a reliable indicator of insect herbivory?
Author(s) Douma, Jacob C.; Ganzeveld, Laurens N.; Unsicker, Sybille B.; Boeckler, Andreas; Dicke, Marcel
Source Plant, Cell & Environment 42 (2019)12. - ISSN 0140-7791 - p. 3308 - 3325.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/pce.13624
Department(s) Crop and Weed Ecology
PE&RC
Meteorology and Air Quality
WIMEK
EPS
Laboratory of Entomology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) - emission - herbivore induced plant volatile (HIPV) - hydroxyl radical - nitrate radical - oxidation - ozone - Populus nigra
Abstract

Plants that are subject to insect herbivory emit a blend of so-called herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs), of which only a few serve as cues for the carnivorous enemies to locate their host. We lack understanding which HIPVs are reliable indicators of insect herbivory. Here, we take a modelling approach to elucidate which physicochemical and physiological properties contribute to the information value of a HIPV. A leaf-level HIPV synthesis and emission model is developed and parameterized to poplar. Next, HIPV concentrations within the canopy are inferred as a function of dispersion, transport and chemical degradation of the compounds. We show that the ability of HIPVs to reveal herbivory varies from almost perfect to no better than chance and interacts with canopy conditions. Model predictions matched well with leaf-emission measurements and field and laboratory assays. The chemical class a compound belongs to predicted the signalling ability of a compound only to a minor extent, whereas compound characteristics such as its reaction rate with atmospheric oxidants, biosynthesis rate upon herbivory and volatility were much more important predictors. This study shows the power of merging fields of plant–insect interactions and atmospheric chemistry research to increase our understanding of the ecological significance of HIPVs.

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