Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 553400
Title Rift Valley fever: biology and epidemiology
Author(s) Wright, Daniel; Kortekaas, Jeroen; Bowden, Thomas A.; Warimwe, George M.
Source Journal of General Virology 100 (2019)8. - ISSN 0022-1317 - p. 1187 - 1199.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1099/jgv.0.001296
Department(s) PE&RC
Virology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) epidemiology - one health - pathogenesis - Rift Valley fever - transmission - vaccine
Abstract

Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis that was first discovered in Kenya in 1930 and is now endemic throughout multiple African countries and the Arabian Peninsula. RVF virus primarily infects domestic livestock (sheep, goats, cattle) causing high rates of neonatal mortality and abortion, with human infection resulting in a wide variety of clinical outcomes, ranging from self-limiting febrile illness to life-threatening haemorrhagic diatheses, and miscarriage in pregnant women. Since its discovery, RVF has caused many outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula with major impacts on human and animal health. However, options for the control of RVF outbreaks are limited by the lack of licensed human vaccines or therapeutics. For this reason, RVF is prioritized by the World Health Organization for urgent research and development of countermeasures for the prevention and control of future outbreaks. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of RVF, including its epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and status of vaccine development.

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