Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 553529
Title Why some fungi senesce and others do not: An evolutionary perspective on fungal senescence
Author(s) Maas, Marc F.P.M.; Debets, Alfons J.M.; Zwaan, Bas J.; Diepeningen, Anne D. van
Source In: The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life Cambridge University Press - ISBN 9781107078505 - p. 341 - 361.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139939867.017
Department(s) PE&RC
Laboratory of Genetics
Biointeractions and Plant Health
Publication type Peer reviewed book chapter
Publication year 2017
Abstract

Fungi are generally considered to be modular organisms with no clear distinction of a germ line: With the expansion of the mycelium, chances for reproduction are expected to increase, and each unit under favourable circumstances may produce offspring. Fungi with such modular body plans are expected to be long-lived, as most fungi indeed seem to be. However, fungi exist that do senesce, and their growth often seems to be limited by space or time. For these fungi, we can consider the term 'pseudo-unitary', as life history details and ecological conditions constrain the size of the soma and the opportunities for reproduction. We may predict the life history traits and ecological conditions that favour such evolution of fungal senescence. Known proximate mechanisms of fungal senescence can be viewed in the light of this evolutionary context.

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