Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 553912
Title A perspective on water quality in connected systems: modelling feedback between upstream and downstream transport and local ecological processes
Author(s) Teurlincx, Sven; Wijk, Dianneke van; Mooij, Wolf M.; Kuiper, Jan J.; Huttunen, Inese; Brederveld, Robert J.; Chang, Manqi; Janse, Jan H.; Woodward, Ben; Hu, Fenjuan; Janssen, Annette B.G.
Source Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 40 (2019). - ISSN 1877-3435 - p. 21 - 29.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2019.07.004
Department(s) Water Systems and Global Change
PE&RC
WIMEK
Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management
GTB Teelt & Gewasfysiologie
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Abstract

Food production for a growing world population relies on application of fertilisers and pesticides on agricultural lands. However, these substances threaten surface water quality and thereby endanger valued ecosystem services such as drinking water supply, food production and recreational water use. Such deleterious effects do not merely arise on the local scale, but also on the regional scale through transport of substances as well as energy and biota across the catchment. Here we argue that aquatic ecosystem models can provide a process-based understanding of how these transports by water and organisms as vectors affect – and are affected by – ecosystem state and functioning in networks of connected lakes. Such a catchment scale approach is key to setting critical limits for the release of substances by agricultural practices and other human pressures on aquatic ecosystems. Thereby, water and food production and the trade-offs between them may be managed more sustainably.

Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.