Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 553997
Title Activity and phylogenetics of the broadly occurring family of microbial nep1-like proteins
Author(s) Seidl, Michael F.; Ackerveken, Guido Van Den
Source Annual Review of Phytopathology 57 (2019). - ISSN 0066-4286 - p. 367 - 386.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100054
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
EPS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) Cytolytic activity - GIPC binding - NEP1-like proteins - Pattern-Triggered immunity - Phylogeny - Phytotoxins
Abstract

Necrosis-and ethylene-inducing peptide 1 (Nep1)-like proteins (NLP) have an extremely broad taxonomic distribution; they occur in bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes. NLPs come in two forms, those that are cytotoxic to eudicot plants and those that are noncytotoxic. Cytotoxic NLPs bind to glycosyl inositol phosphoryl ceramide (GIPC) sphingolipids that are abundant in the outer leaflet of plant plasma membranes. Binding allows the NLP to become cytolytic in eudicots but not monocots. The function of noncytotoxic NLPs remains enigmatic, but the expansion of NLP genes in oomycete genomes suggests they are important. Several plant species have evolved the capacity to recognize NLPs as molecular patterns and trigger plant immunity, e.g., Arabidopsis thaliana detects nlp peptides via the receptor-like protein RLP23. In this review, we provide a historical perspective from discovery to understanding of molecular mechanisms and describe the latest developments in the NLP field to shed light on these fascinating microbial proteins.

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