Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 555678
Title The fertilization effect of global dimming on crop yields is not attributed to an improved light interception
Author(s) Shao, Liping; Li, Gang; Zhao, Qiannan; Li, Yabing; Sun, Yutong; Wang, Weinan; Cai, Chuang; Chen, Weiping; Liu, Ronghua; Luo, Weihong; Yin, Xinyou; Lee, Xuhui
Source Global Change Biology 26 (2020)3. - ISSN 1354-1013 - p. 1697 - 1713.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14822
Department(s) Centre for Crop Systems Analysis
PE&RC
Crop Physiology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2020
Keyword(s) acclimation - diffuse radiation - fertilization effect - global dimming - radiation use efficiency - rice - wheat - yield
Abstract

Global dimming, a decadal decrease in incident global radiation, is often accompanied with an increase in the diffuse radiation fraction, and, therefore, the impact of global dimming on crop production is hard to predict. A popular approach to quantify this impact is the statistical analysis of historical climate and crop data, or use of dynamic crop simulation modelling approach. Here, we show that statistical analysis of historical data did not provide plausible values for the effect of diffuse radiation versus direct radiation on rice or wheat yield. In contrast, our field experimental study of 3 years demonstrated a fertilization effect of increased diffuse radiation fraction, which partly offset yield losses caused by decreased global radiation, in both crops. The fertilization effect was not attributed to any improved canopy light interception but mainly to the increased radiation use efficiency (RUE). The increased RUE was explained not only by the saturating shape of photosynthetic light response curves but also by plant acclimation to dimming that gradually increased leaf nitrogen concentration. Crop harvest index slightly decreased under dimming, thereby discounting the fertilization effect on crop yields. These results challenge existing modelling paradigms, which assume that the fertilization effect on crop yields is mainly attributed to an improved light interception. Further studies on the physiological mechanism of plant acclimation are required to better quantify the global dimming impact on agroecosystem productivity under future climate change.

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