Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 559050
Title Microbial amendments alter protist communities within the soil microbiome
Author(s) Xiong, Wu; Li, Rong; Guo, Sai; Karlsson, Ida; Jiao, Zixuan; Xun, Weibing; Kowalchuk, George A.; Shen, Qirong; Geisen, Stefan
Source Soil Biology and Biochemistry 135 (2019). - ISSN 0038-0717 - p. 379 - 382.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2019.05.025
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2019
Keyword(s) Bacillus - Beneficial microbes - Fungi/bacteria ratio - Soil function - Soil protists
Abstract

Plant-beneficial microbes improve while pathogens reduce plant performance. When introduced in soils, such microbes can induce entire microbiome changes. However, the impact of those microbial introductions on protists – key predators within the soil microbiome – remain unknown. Here, we tracked how soil protists respond to bacterial (Bacillus and Ralstonia) and fungal (Trichoderma and Fusarium) introductions, with both microbial groups represented by one beneficial and one pathogenic taxon. We found that plant-beneficial Bacillus bacteria change the protist community structure. This community-shift was likely induced by an increased fungi/bacteria ratio, supported by a negative correlation of the fungi/bacteria ratio with the relative abundance of phagotrophic protists across all treatments. Our results indicate that microbial introductions can impact protist communities, thereby altering microbiome-derived multi-functionality.

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