Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 561262
Title Experimental nasal colonization of piglets with methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Author(s) Verstappen, Koen M.; Duim, Birgitta; Nes, Arie van; Snijders, Susan; Wamel, Willem J.B. van; Wagenaar, Jaap A.
Source Veterinary Microbiology 174 (2014)3-4. - ISSN 0378-1135 - p. 483 - 488.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.09.019
Department(s) Infection Biology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) Co-colonization - MRSA - Nasal colonization - Pigs - S. aureus
Abstract

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sequence type (ST)398 is widely spread among livestock. People in contact with livestock have a higher risk of testing positive for MRSA. Several experimental settings have been described to study in vivo colonization of MRSA in pigs, each having its own limitations. The aim of this study was to develop a nose-colonization model in pigs to quantitatively study the colonization of MRSA and the co-colonization of MSSA and MRSA.Two experiments were performed: in the first experiment piglets received an intranasal inoculation with MRSA ST398, spa-type t011, and in the second experiment piglets received an intranasal inoculation with two MSSA strains (ST398, spa-type t011 and t034) and two MRSA strains (also ST398, spa-type t011 and t034) to investigate co-colonization. Colonization was quantitatively monitored for 2 weeks in both experiments.Nasal colonization was successfully established in all piglets with stable numbers of S. aureus between 104 and 106CFU. MSSA and MRSA were able to co-colonize.

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