Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 561416
Title Convergent Evolution of Hydrogenosomes from Mitochondria by Gene Transfer and Loss
Author(s) Lewis, William H.; Lind, Anders E.; Sendra, Kacper M.; Onsbring, Henning; Williams, Tom A.; Esteban, Genoveva F.; Hirt, Robert P.; Ettema, Thijs J.G.; Embley, T.M.
Source Molecular Biology and Evolution 37 (2020)2. - ISSN 0737-4038 - p. 524 - 539.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msz239
Department(s) Microbiology
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2020
Keyword(s) anaerobic metabolism - evolution - genomics - hydrogenosomes - microbial eukaryotes - mitochondria
Abstract

Hydrogenosomes are H2-producing mitochondrial homologs found in some anaerobic microbial eukaryotes that provide a rare intracellular niche for H2-utilizing endosymbiotic archaea. Among ciliates, anaerobic and aerobic lineages are interspersed, demonstrating that the switch to an anaerobic lifestyle with hydrogenosomes has occurred repeatedly and independently. To investigate the molecular details of this transition, we generated genomic and transcriptomic data sets from anaerobic ciliates representing three distinct lineages. Our data demonstrate that hydrogenosomes have evolved from ancestral mitochondria in each case and reveal different degrees of independent mitochondrial genome and proteome reductive evolution, including the first example of complete mitochondrial genome loss in ciliates. Intriguingly, the FeFe-hydrogenase used for generating H2 has a unique domain structure among eukaryotes and appears to have been present, potentially through a single lateral gene transfer from an unknown donor, in the common aerobic ancestor of all three lineages. The early acquisition and retention of FeFe-hydrogenase helps to explain the facility whereby mitochondrial function can be so radically modified within this diverse and ecologically important group of microbial eukaryotes.

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