Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 562763
Title The Chinese milk supply chain: A fraud perspective
Author(s) Yang, Yuzheng; Huisman, Wim; Hettinga, Kasper A.; Zhang, Liebing; Ruth, Saskia M. van
Source Food Control 113 (2020). - ISSN 0956-7135
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2020.107211
Department(s) BU Authenticity & Bioassays
VLAG
Food Quality and Design
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2020
Keyword(s) China - Dairy farmer - Economically motivated adulteration - Fraud vulnerability assessment - Milk processor - Milk supply chain
Abstract

Food fraud has become a serious concern all over the world and especially in China. The melamine contaminated infant formula in 2008 has brought food fraud in the spotlights. This incident had grave consequences for the Chinese citizens as well as the Chinese milk industry. Fraud vulnerability assessments are the first step towards food fraud prevention and mitigation. To combat food fraud, one has to think like a criminal. In the current study, we determined the most vulnerable points in the Chinese milk supply chain, and examined the underlying causes. The fraud vulnerability perceived by 90 Chinese dairy farmers and 14 milk processors was evaluated with the SSAFE food fraud vulnerability assessment tool. Overall, actors perceived the milk supply chain as low to medium vulnerable to food fraud. Farmers appeared significantly more vulnerable than processors due to enhanced opportunities and motivations, and less adequate controls. Both geographical location of the farms and their size affected their perceived fraud vulnerability significantly.

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