Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 562783
Title Rhizosphere protists are key determinants of plant health
Author(s) Xiong, Wu; Song, Yuqi; Yang, Keming; Gu, Yian; Wei, Zhong; Kowalchuk, George A.; Xu, Yangchun; Jousset, Alexandre; Shen, Qirong; Geisen, Stefan
Source Microbiome 8 (2020)1. - ISSN 2049-2618
DOI https://doi.org/10.1186/s40168-020-00799-9
Department(s) Laboratory of Nematology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2020
Keyword(s) Pathogen of Ralstonia solanacearum - Plant health - Predator-prey interactions - Protists - Rhizosphere - Secondary metabolite genes
Abstract

Background: Plant health is intimately influenced by the rhizosphere microbiome, a complex assembly of organisms that changes markedly across plant growth. However, most rhizosphere microbiome research has focused on fractions of this microbiome, particularly bacteria and fungi. It remains unknown how other microbial components, especially key microbiome predators - protists - are linked to plant health. Here, we investigated the holistic rhizosphere microbiome including bacteria, microbial eukaryotes (fungi and protists), as well as functional microbial metabolism genes. We investigated these communities and functional genes throughout the growth of tomato plants that either developed disease symptoms or remained healthy under field conditions. Results: We found that pathogen dynamics across plant growth is best predicted by protists. More specifically, communities of microbial-feeding phagotrophic protists differed between later healthy and diseased plants at plant establishment. The relative abundance of these phagotrophs negatively correlated with pathogen abundance across plant growth, suggesting that predator-prey interactions influence pathogen performance. Furthermore, phagotrophic protists likely shifted bacterial functioning by enhancing pathogen-suppressing secondary metabolite genes involved in mitigating pathogen success. Conclusions: We illustrate the importance of protists as top-down controllers of microbiome functioning linked to plant health. We propose that a holistic microbiome perspective, including bacteria and protists, provides the optimal next step in predicting plant performance. [MediaObject not available: see fulltext.]

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