Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 564042
Title Foraging minds in modern environments : High-calorie and savory-taste biases in human food spatial memory
Author(s) Vries, Rachelle de; Vet, Emely de; Graaf, Kees de; Boesveldt, Sanne
Source Appetite 152 (2020). - ISSN 0195-6663
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2020.104718
Department(s) Sensory Science and Eating Behaviour
Consumption and Healthy Lifestyles
WASS
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2020
Keyword(s) Cognitive bias - Eating behavior - Food spatial memory - Olfaction - Optimal foraging theory - Vision
Abstract

Human memory may show sensitivity to content that carried fitness-relevance throughout evolutionary history. We investigated whether biases in human food spatial memory exist and influence the eating behavior of individuals within the modern food environment. In two lab studies with distinct samples of 88 participants, individuals had to re-locate foods on a map in a computer-based spatial memory task using visual (Study 1) or olfactory (Study 2) cues that signaled sweet and savory high- and low-calorie foods. Individuals consistently displayed an enhanced memory for locations of high-calorie and savory-tasting foods – regardless of hedonic evaluations, personal experiences with foods, or the time taken to encode food locations. However, we did not find any clear effects of the high-calorie or savory-taste bias in food spatial memory on eating behavior. Findings highlight that content matters deeply for the faculty of human food spatial memory and indicate an implicit cognitive system presumably attuned to ancestral priorities of optimal foraging.

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