Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 565705
Title Early pathogenesis of wesselsbron disease in pregnant ewes
Author(s) Oymans, Judith; Keulen, Lucien van; Wichgers Schreur, Paul J.; Kortekaas, Jeroen
Source Pathogens 9 (2020)5. - ISSN 2076-0817
DOI https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9050373
Department(s) Virology
Laboratory of Virology
Infection Biology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2020
Keyword(s) Flavivirus - Immunohistochemistry - Neuroinvasion - Pregnant ewes - Vertical transmission - Wesselsbron virus
Abstract

Wesselsbron virus (WSLV) is a neglected, mosquito-borne flavivirus that is endemic to the African continent. The virus is teratogenic to ruminants and causes a self-limiting febrile illness in humans. Wesselsbron disease manifests with similar clinical signs and occurs in the same areas under the same climatic conditions as Rift Valley fever, which is therefore included in the differential diagnosis. Although the gross pathology of WSLV infection in pregnant ewes is reported in literature, the pathogenesis that leads to stillbirths, congenital malformations and abortion has remained undescribed. In the present study, pregnant ewes were inoculated with WSLV and subjected to detailed clinical- and histopathology 8 days later. The virus was mainly detected in foetal trophoblasts of the placenta and in neural progenitor cells, differentiated neurons, oligodendrocytes, microglia and astrocytes. Our study demonstrates that WSLV efficiently crosses the maternal–foetal interface and is highly neuroinvasive in the ovine foetus.

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