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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 566031
Title Institutional preferences, social preferences and cooperation : Evidence from a lab-in-the-field experiment in rural China
Author(s) Yang, Xiaojun; Nie, Zihan; Qiu, Jianying; Tu, Qin
Source Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics 87 (2020). - ISSN 2214-8043
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socec.2020.101554
Department(s) Development Economics
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2020
Keyword(s) Cooperation - Institutional preferences - Punishment - Reward - Social preferences
Abstract

We examine institutional preferences, social preferences, contribution in public goods games, and their relationships by conducting a lab-in-the-field experiment in rural China. Specifically, we examine whether people contribute differently depending on whether they are facing their preferred enforcement institution (punishment versus reward); that is, whether there is an institutional match or mismatch effect on cooperation. We also examine what factors are behind their institutional preferences. We find that most subjects prefer reward over punishment. However, institutional (mis)match does not have significant impacts on contributions in the public goods game. Moreover, subjects who prefer punishment tend to be free-riders. We further find that there is a robust relationship between the preference for punishment and certain efficiency-reducing social preference profiles, such as anti-social preferences, which may help understand the institutional preferences.

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