Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 569803
Title Innate immune training and metabolic reprogramming in primary monocytes of broiler and laying hens
Author(s) Verwoolde, Michel B.; Biggelaar, Robin H.G.A. van den; Vries Reilingh, Ger de; Arts, Joop A.J.; Baal, Jürgen van; Lammers, Aart; Jansen, Christine A.
Source Developmental and Comparative Immunology 114 (2020). - ISSN 0145-305X
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dci.2020.103811
Department(s) Animal Nutrition
Adaptation Physiology
WIAS
Cell Biology and Immunology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2020
Keyword(s) Chickens - Immune training - Lipopolysaccharide - Metabolism - Monocytes - β-glucan
Abstract

Recently, we have reported trained innate immunity in laying chicken monocytes. In the present study, we further investigated trained innate immunity of monocytes in layers and broilers. Monocytes of both breeds isolated from blood were trained in vitro with β-glucan, rec-chicken IL-4 or a combination of both, and restimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), after which inflammation and metabolism-related responses were measured. Training of laying and broiler hen monocytes resulted in increased mRNA levels of IL-1β, iNOS and HIF-1α, but enhanced surface expression of CD40 and NO production was only observed in layers. Our in vitro study demonstrates that monocytes from different genetic backgrounds can be trained. However, the observed differences suggest a differential effect on immune functionality associated with innate training. Whether these differences in immune functions between layers and broilers have effect on disease resistance remains to be elucidated.

Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.