Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Relative contribution of production chain phases to health and performance of broiler chickens : a field study
    Jong, Ingrid C. de; Riel, Johan W. van - \ 2020
    Poultry Science 99 (2020)1. - ISSN 0032-5791 - p. 179 - 188.
    broiler - broiler breeder - health - performance - production chain data

    There is increasing evidence that health and performance of the breeder flock significantly contributes to health and performance of their progeny. Data of broiler performance and health are routinely collected in various stages of the broiler production chain. In the Netherlands, the broiler chain operates at a relatively non-integrated level and the various databases are usually not connected. Connecting databases may however provide important information to improve chain performance. The aim of the present study was to determine systematic effects of broiler breeder production farm or flock on health (mortality and antibiotics use) and performance of their offspring, using data routinely collected at the different stages of the production chain. Broiler flock data collected over 6 yr (daily growth, slaughter weight, carcass weight uniformity, carcass condemnations, first week and total mortality, and antibiotics use) were linked to breeder flocks and farms. In total, 2,174 broiler flock records (at house level) of 74 broiler farms were linked to 88 broiler breeder farms and 209 breeder flocks. A mixed model analysis was applied to simultaneously estimate effects of season, parent flock age, time trend, and the contribution of the different chain phases to broiler performance and health. No systematic effects of breeder farm and only small systematic effects of breeder flock on broiler health and performance were found. The largest breeder flock effect was found for carcass condemnations (estimated contribution to the variance component: 7%). Most variation on broiler health and performance was explained by broiler farm and “day-old chick batch.” The latter refers to the rest variance that could not be explained by other factors, i.e., incidental effects linked to the specific day-old chick batch and the stage between the breeder and broiler farm. Our results suggest that systematic effects of breeder flock and farm could have been overruled by (management in) the hatchery phase and the broiler farm. This indicates room for improvement of management in these production phases.

    Groen en Werken : De meerwaarde van groen in de stedelijke omgeving
    Hiemstra, J.A. ; Vries, S. de; Spijker, J.H. - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Wageningen Environmental Research - 6 p.
    labour - work - work stress - offices - plantations - gardens - well-being - climate - health
    Associations between carcass weight uniformity and production measures on farm and at slaughter in commercial broiler flocks
    Vasdal, Guro ; Granquist, Erik Georg ; Skjerve, Eystein ; Jong, Ingrid C. de; Berg, Charlotte ; Michel, Virginie ; Moe, Randi Oppermann - \ 2019
    Poultry Science 98 (2019)10. - ISSN 0032-5791 - p. 4261 - 4268.
    chicken - health - indicator - poultry - welfare

    In poultry flocks, flock weight uniformity is often defined as the percent individuals within 10% of the mean body weight (BW) and the variability of this uniformity can be expressed as the CV of BW. Flock weight uniformity is a standardized and objective measured, and could potentially be used as a welfare indicator; however, little is known about the relationship between flock uniformity and other production measures on-farm or at slaughter. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between carcass weight uniformity (CV of BW) and production measures on-farm and at slaughter in Norwegian commercial broiler flocks. A total of 45 randomly selected mixed-sex Ross 308 broiler flocks were visited prior to slaughter at 28 to 30 D of age (average slaughter age 30.6 D). All flocks were raised under similar farm management systems. The Welfare Quality protocol for broilers was used to assess different animal welfare indicators in each flock. All production data from the slaughterhouse were collected for each flock, including carcass weight uniformity (%), mortality (%), growth rate (g), feed conversion ratio (FCR), and rejected birds (%) in different rejection categories. Univariable and multivariable linear regression models were used to investigate the associations between flock weight uniformity and production and welfare measures. The results showed that flock uniformity varied from 11% to 18% between flocks within the same hybrid, similar management standards, and similar slaughter age (day 29 to 32). Poorer uniformity (i.e., high CV) was associated with increased first week mortality (P < 0.004, r = 1.48, increased total mortality (P < 0.013, r = 0.01), increased FCR (i.e., less efficient growth) (P < 0.024, r = 0.06), reduced growth rate (P < 0.0012, r = -0.01), and a reduced rejection rate at slaughter (P < 0.006, r = -0.01). The results show that flock uniformity varies across broiler flocks, and is associated with several production measures.

    Associations between colostrum management, passive immunity, calf-related hygiene practices, and rates of mortality in preweaning dairy calves
    Barry, J. ; Bokkers, E.A.M. ; Berry, D.P. ; Boer, I.J.M. de; McClure, J. ; Kennedy, E. - \ 2019
    Journal of Dairy Science 102 (2019)11. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 10266 - 10276.
    bull calves - commercial farms - health - serum immunoglobulin G - welfare

    Calves are particularly vulnerable to health issues before weaning and experience high rates of mortality. Poor colostrum quality or substandard colostrum management, combined with poor hygiene, can increase disease susceptibility, contributing to elevated mortality rates. This study aimed to assess colostrum and calf management together with subsequent mortality rates in preweaning calves. Forty-seven Irish spring-calving, pasture-based dairy herds were enrolled in the study. To investigate whether colostrum and hygiene practices change as the calving season progresses, each farm was visited in both the first and last 6 wk of the calving season. The concentration of IgG in 250 colostrum samples and 580 calf serum samples was determined by radial immunodiffusion assay. Mean colostrum IgG concentration was 85 mg/mL, and mean calf serum IgG concentration was 30.9 and 27.1 mg/mL, respectively, in the first and last 6 wk of the calving season. Smaller herd size and younger age at sampling were associated with higher calf serum IgG concentration. Dairy breed calves were associated with higher serum IgG concentrations compared with beef breed calves; no association was detected based on sex. For feeding equipment hygiene, we assessed the presence of protein residues and found that hygiene levels tended to worsen from the first to the final 6 wk of the calving season. We found no association between feeding equipment hygiene and herd size or 28-d calf mortality rate. Colostrum and calf management practices were not associated with either calf serum IgG concentration or 28-d calf mortality rate. We found that IgG concentration in colostrum produced in Irish dairy herds was generally good, although large variation existed, emphasizing the need for assessment of colostrum before feeding. Results also suggested that hygiene practices associated with calf rearing can be improved, particularly in the latter half of the calving season.

    The Gut Microbiota in the First Decade of Life
    Derrien, Muriel ; Alvarez, Anne Sophie ; Vos, Willem M. de - \ 2019
    Trends in Microbiology 27 (2019)12. - ISSN 0966-842X - p. 997 - 1010.
    children - evolution - gut microbiota - health - intervention - plasticity

    Appreciation of the importance of the gut microbiome is growing, and it is becoming increasingly relevant to identify preventive or therapeutic solutions targeting it. The composition and function of the gut microbiota are relatively well described for infants (less than 3 years) and adults, but have been largely overlooked in pre-school (3–6 years) and primary school-age (6–12 years) children, as well as teenagers (12–18 years). Early reports suggested that the infant microbiota would attain an adult-like structure at the age of 3 years, but recent studies have suggested that microbiota development may take longer. This development time is of key importance because there is evidence to suggest that deviations in this development may have consequences in later life. In this review, we provide an overview of current knowledge concerning the gut microbiota, its evolution, variation, and response to dietary challenges during the first decade of life with a focus on healthy pre-school and primary school-age children (up to 12 years) from various populations around the globe. This knowledge should facilitate the identification of diet-based approaches targeting individuals of this age group, to promote the development of a healthy microbiota in later life.

    What if you do not have a healthy weight? | WURcast
    Kampman, E. - \ 2019
    Wageningen :
    weight - health - cancer - risk
    Estimating the impact of clinical mastitis in dairy cows on greenhouse gas emissions using a dynamic stochastic simulation model: A case study
    Mostert, P.F. ; Bokkers, E.A.M. ; Boer, I.J.M. De; Middelaar, C.E. Van - \ 2019
    Animal 13 (2019)12. - ISSN 1751-7311 - p. 2913 - 2921.
    carbon footprint - disease - environmental impact - health - modeling

    The increasing attention for global warming is likely to contribute to the introduction of policies or other incentives to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to livestock production, including dairy. The dairy sector is an important contributor to GHG emissions. Clinical mastitis (CM), an intramammary infection, results in reduced milk production and fertility, increases culling and mortality of cows and, therefore, has a negative impact on the efficiency (output/input) of milk production. This may increase GHG emissions per unit of product. Our objective was to estimate the impact of CM in dairy cows on GHG emissions of milk production for the Dutch situation. A dynamic stochastic simulation model was developed to simulate the dynamics and losses of CM for individual lactations. Cows receive a parity (1 to 5+), a milk production and a calving interval (CI). Based on the parity, cows have a risk of CM, with a maximum of three cases in a lactation. Pathogens causing CM were classified as gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, or other. Based on the parity and pathogen combinations, cows had a reduced milk production, discarded milk, prolonged CI and a risk of removal (culling and mortality) that reduce productivity of dairy cows and therefore increase GHG emissions per unit of product. Using life cycle assessment, emissions of GHGs were estimated from cradle to farm gate for processes along the milk production chain that are affected by CM. Processes included were feed production, enteric fermentation, and manure management. Emissions of GHGs were expressed as kg CO2 equivalents per ton of fat-and-protein-corrected milk (kg CO2e/t FPCM). Emissions of cows with CM increased on average by 57.5 (6.2%) kg CO2e/t FPCM compared with cows without CM. This increase was caused by removal (39%), discarded milk (38%), reduced milk production (17%) and prolonged CI (6%). The GHG emissions increased by 48 kg CO2e/t FPCM for cows with one case of CM, by 69 kg CO2e/t FPCM for cows with two cases of CM and by 92 kg CO2e/t FPCM for cows with three cases of CM compared with cows without CM. Preventing CM can be an effective strategy for farmers to reduce GHG emissions and can contribute to sustainable development of the dairy sector, because this also can improve the income of farmers and the welfare of cows. The impact of CM on GHG emissions, however, will vary between farms due to environmental conditions and management practices.

    The risks of drinking sugar sweetened drinks | WURcast
    Kampman, E. - \ 2019
    Wageningen :
    sugar - health - diseases - blood sugar - carbohydrates - soft drinks
    The consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks increases rapidly. What is the danger of these drinks? This lesson is part of the WageningenX MOOC called 'Nutrition and Cancer'.
    Dossier Nature Based Solutions
    Spijker, J.H. - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Groen Kennisnet
    urban planning - ecosystem services - urban areas - greening - health - heat resistance - trees - climatic change - water holding capacity - biodiversity - population education - mobility - well-being - gardens - air pollution
    Het leefbaar houden van steden en dorpen is een belangrijke uitdaging van deze tijd. Daarnaast zorgt klimaatverandering voor een toenemende vraag naar slimme oplossingen om in te spelen op extremere weersomstandigheden. Het vergroenen van steden en dorpen biedt niet alleen een oplossing voor klimaatgerelateerde problemen, maar bevordert ook het woonplezier en de gezondheid van bewoners. Dit dossier laat zien hoe slimme groene oplossingen kunnen helpen bij de inrichting en het beheer van woongebieden ter bevordering van de leefbaarheid en klimaatadaptatie. Thema's zoals biodiversiteit, adaptatie en mitigatie komen aan bod.
    The Preterm Gut Microbiota: An Inconspicuous Challenge in Nutritional Neonatal Care
    Henderickx, Jannie G.E. ; Zwittink, Romy D. ; Lingen, Richard A. van; Knol, Jan ; Belzer, Clara - \ 2019
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology 9 (2019). - ISSN 2235-2988 - 1 p.
    development - gastrointestinal tract - growth - gut microbiota - health - immune system - preterm - very low birth weight

    The nutritional requirements of preterm infants are unique and challenging to meet in neonatal care, yet crucial for their growth, development and health. Normally, the gut microbiota has distinct metabolic capacities, making their role in metabolism of dietary components indispensable. In preterm infants, variation in microbiota composition is introduced while facing a unique set of environmental conditions. However, the effect of such variation on the microbiota's metabolic capacity and on the preterm infant's growth and development remains unresolved. In this review, we will provide a holistic overview on the development of the preterm gut microbiota and the unique environmental conditions contributing to this, in addition to maturation of the gastrointestinal tract and immune system in preterm infants. The role of prematurity, as well as the role of human milk, in the developmental processes is emphasized. Current research stresses the early life gut microbiota as cornerstone for simultaneous development of the gastrointestinal tract and immune system. Besides that, literature provides clues that prematurity affects growth and development. As such, this review is concluded with our hypothesis that prematurity of the gut microbiota may be an inconspicuous clinical challenge in achieving optimal feeding besides traditional challenges, such as preterm breast milk composition, high nutritional requirements and immaturity of the gastrointestinal tract and immune system. A better understanding of the metabolic capacity of the gut microbiota and its impact on gut and immune maturation in preterm infants could complement current feeding regimens in future neonatal care and thereby facilitate growth, development and health in preterm infants.

    Nature Based Solutions
    Spijker, Joop - \ 2019
    urban planning - urban areas - ecosystem services - greening - health - water - heat resistance - trees - climatic change - water holding capacity - biodiversity - stress - population education - mobility
    Voor de uitdagingen van de stad 21e eeuw: 25 jaar VBG, Wageningen 22 maart 2019
    Understanding urban consumers' food choice beavior in Ethiopia: Promoting demand for healthy foods
    Melesse, M.B. ; Berg, M.M. van den; Brauw, Alan de; Abate, Gashaw T. - \ 2019
    Washington DC : International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) (Strategy Support Program, Working Paper 131 ) - 33 p.
    nutrition - health - food prices - food security - trade - gender
    Using survey data collected from 996 representative households in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, this paper documents several insights to help understand urban consumer food purchasing and consumption choices. The findings can be summarized as follows: 1) We find that households face important dietary gaps; a large proportion eats insufficient amounts of nutrient-dense vegetables, animal-source foods, and fruits. 2) The consumption of ultra-processed foods increases with income and may become a pressing health concern as incomes rise. 3) From a purchasing perspective, we find that consumers buy foods for different purposes at different outlets. Nearby kiosks and informal street markets are frequented for small food items and for fruits and vegetables, while formal open markets and consumer cooperatives are used for bulky food items. 4) Respondents make food and food outlet choices based on their health and food safety concerns, but few consider the nutritional value of food when purchasing it. Concurrently, the availability of a wide variety of healthy and safe foods is highly valued by most respondents for outlet choice. Among consumers in lower income categories, they tend to make food and food outlet choices based on prices and location convenience. 5) Although nutrition is not a primary concern when making choices about food, consumers appear to have reasonable nutritional knowledge. Most respondents considered a healthy diet to be primarily plant-based. Most people are aware that they should eat more fruits and vegetables and less sugary, fatty, and salty foods, but they have limited knowledge on the nutrient content of specific foods and the causes of obesity. 6) Labelling would not be an effective way to increase nutritional knowledge; most respondents have limited understanding of the information that labels provide. Rather, most respondents trust the information provided by health professionals over other sources. In sum, these results are potentially relevant for policy and the design of future programs for improving nutritional outcomes through enhanced diets.
    Greenery and Healthcare : The positive effects of greenery in urban environments
    Hiemstra, J.A. ; Vries, S. de; Spijker, J.H. - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - 6 p.
    health - hospitals - patient care - patients - well-being - public green areas - botanical gardens - plantations - social welfare - health indicators - stress - rehabilitation - gezondheid - ziekenhuizen - patiëntenzorg - patiënten - welzijn - openbaar groen - botanische tuinen - beplantingen - sociaal welzijn - gezondheidsindicatoren - herstel
    Greenery in and around nursing homes, hospitals and other clinics is good for the climate inside and outside the building, and has a positive effect on patient’s state of mind and ability to recover, as well as the general well-being of patients, staff and visitors. This document provides information on the benefits of greenery for recovery and well-being, including references to scientific literature. It concludes with some tips on how to ensure the successful and beneficial inclusion of greenery
    Greenery and Work : The positive effects of greenery in urban environments
    Hiemstra, J.A. ; Vries, S. de; Spijker, J.H. - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - 6 p.
    offices - work - climate - health - well-being - stress - stress tolerance - labour - kantoren - werk - klimaat - gezondheid - welzijn - stresstolerantie - arbeid (werk)
    Greenery in and around offices and other working environments is good for both the indoor and outdoor climate, and has a positive effect on the health and general well-being of employees and visitors. It aids concentration, helps reduce stress and increases staff productivity. This document provides information on the benefits of greenery in relation to work and well-being, including references to scientific literature. It concludes with some tips on how to ensure the successful and beneficial inclusion of greenery.
    Greenery and residential : The positive effects of greenery in urban environments
    Hiemstra, J.A. ; Vries, S. de; Spijker, J.H. - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - 7 p.
    residential areas - housing - plantations - public green areas - gardens - domestic gardens - health indicators - green roofs - green walls - temperature - climate - heat stress - health - woonwijken - huisvesting - beplantingen - openbaar groen - tuinen - tuinen bij het huis - gezondheidsindicatoren - groene daken - groene gevels - temperatuur - klimaat - warmtestress - gezondheid
    Greenery in and around houses and apartments is good for the (living) environment in and around the buildings. It has a positive effect on the health and general well-being of residents and visitors. This document provides information on how homes and well-being can benefit from greenery, including references to scientific literature. It concludes with some tips on how to ensure the successful and beneficial inclusion of greenery.
    Greenery: more than beauty and health : The positive effects of greenery in urban environments
    Hiemstra, J.A. ; Vries, S. de; Spijker, J.H. - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - 6 p.
    health - well-being - plants - trees - reconditioning - air quality - biodiversity - air conditioning - learning - labour - green roofs - green walls - gezondheid - welzijn - planten - bomen - herstellen - luchtkwaliteit - biodiversiteit - klimaatregeling - leren - arbeid (werk) - groene daken - groene gevels
    Greenery in our living environment benefits more than just our health and well-being. It also facilitates water management and promotes biodiversity in built-up areas, and can help reduce the effects of noise pollution. Greenery also helps to raise the property value of homes and offices. This document provides general information on the benefits of greenery, and complements the detailed fact sheets on how greenery can improve health and well-being in Residential, Professional, Educational and Healthcare contexts.
    Greenery and Education : The positive effects of greenery in urban environments
    Hiemstra, J.A. ; Vries, S. de; Spijker, J.H. - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - 7 p.
    learning - children - universities - climate - educational institutions - education - social welfare - well-being - health - pupils - students - schools - leren - kinderen - universiteiten - klimaat - onderwijsinstellingen - onderwijs - sociaal welzijn - welzijn - gezondheid - leerlingen - studenten - scholen
    Greenery in and around schools and nurseries and on campuses enhances the ambience of educational institutions, both inside and out. It has a positive effect on the health and general well-being of students and staff alike, improving student’s performance and their ability to concentrate, as well as enhancing the social climate. This document provides insights into the benefits of greenery for learning and well-being, including references to scientific literature. It concludes with some tips on how to ensure the successful and beneficial inclusion of greenery.
    An integrated look at the effect of structure on nutrient bioavailability in plant foods
    Capuano, Edoardo ; Pellegrini, Nicoletta - \ 2019
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 99 (2019)2. - ISSN 0022-5142 - p. 493 - 498.
    bioavailability - digestion - food matrix - health - structure

    The true bioavailability of a nutrient being intrinsically coupled to the specific food matrix in which it occurs remains poorly considered in nutrition science. During digestion, the food matrix and, in particular, the structure of food modulate the extent and kinetics to which nutrients and bioactive compounds make themselves available for absorption. In this perspective, we describe an integrated look at the effect of structure on nutrient bioavailability in plant foods. Based on this integrated look, cell wall integrity and the particle size of the plant material during its transit in the small intestine determine the bioavailability of plant nutrients; in turn, cell wall integrity and particle size are determined by the level of oral processing and, accordingly, what subsequently escapes digestion in the upper intestine and is utilized by colon microbiota. Ultimately, the effect on nutrient digestion is linked to food structure through each step of digestion. A consideration of the structure rather than just the composition of foods opens up possibilities for the design of healthier foods.

    Uitdagingen van de stad 21e eeuw
    Spijker, Joop - \ 2018
    urban planning - urban areas - mobility - greening - health - water - heat resistance - trees - climatic change - water holding capacity - biodiversity - stress - population education
    Groen en welbevinden : Hoe kan het groen in de directe woonomgeving bijdragen aan het welbevinden van verschillende bewoners?
    Vries, S. de - \ 2018
    Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - 57 p.
    public green areas - health - ecosystem services - physical activity - social cooperation - study - youth - health indicators
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