Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Hydrology in a Dutch polder catchment: natural processes in a man-made landscape
Brauer, C.C. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. - \ 2012
Experimental catchments are traditionally located in areas with limited human influence, but the societal and financial losses due to hydrological extremes are often larger in more densely populated areas. In The Netherlands and other delta areas around the world, intensive drainage and water level regulation have made patches of originally swampy land between cities suitable for agriculture. The question is how the rainfall-runoff processes in these artificial catchments compare to those occurring in more natural catchments and whether conceptual hydrological models, which have been developed for natural landscapes, contain the appropriate hydrological processes for application to artificial catchments. Our experimental “catchment” of 0.5 km2 is part of a polder area located near the town of Cabauw in The Netherlands. This polder is completely flat and at an “elevation" of one meter below mean sea level. The catchment is drained by many small, man-made channels of which the water levels are regulated. Water is supplied upstream into the catchment by the local water authority. The catchment is part of the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR), which is well-known in the international meteorological community. In addition to the large amount of meteorlogical measurements, including precipitation and actual evapotranspiration, we measure discharge (both into and out of the catchment), ground water levels and soil moisture contents. We will present a detailed development of the water balance terms over several years, an overview of the main hydrological processes during wet and dry conditions and differences between natural and polder catchments.
Water budget of the Cabauw experimental site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR), The Netherlands
Uijlenhoet, R. ; Brauer, C.C. ; Stricker, J.N.M. - \ 2012
stimating water and energy fluxes at the land surface is difficult and the resulting uncertainty is an important source of error in many hydrological and meteorological models. To understand the fluxes and feedback mechanisms in land surface hydrology, it is important to measure as many fluxes and states as possible at one location. Understanding and quantifying these flux processes through observation can help to improve both meteorological and hydrological models. Water budgets are often used to determine the size of water fluxes across catchment boundaries. This research project focuses on the water budget of a man-made (polder) water system in Cabauw, The Netherlands. The Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR) is a hotspot for meteorological and hydrological observations in The Netherlands. The most important feature is the 213-m-high observation tower which provides vertical profiles of many quantities, such as wind and temperature, which can be used for boundary layer modeling studies. An X-band polarimetric precipitation radar is located on top of the tower. An extended meteorological station, dedicated fields for measuring energy fluxes, radiation and precipitation and remote sensing equipment are located around the tower. Cabauw is a FLUXNET site and often used for satellite ground validation. In addition to the extensive meteorological observations, hydrological measurements are required to understand the water and energy fluxes and study the water budget of the 0.5 km2 polder area around the site. This “catchment” can be divided into two nested catchments of 0.3 and 0.2 km2. It is part of a polder area, and drained by small, man-made channels. The area is flat and at an elevation of one meter below mean sea level. Water is supplied upstream. Downstream of the inlet a V-notch weir has been installed. At the outlets of the first and second sub-catchment Rossby-weirs have been installed. Discharge is derived from water levels recorded with pressure sensors and a stage-discharge relationship obtained in the laboratory. In April 2009 a magneto-strictive sensor has been installed upstream of the V-notch weir to measure water levels directly. Accurate discharge data are available since May 2007. Soil moisture data are obtained from a TDR-system of 36 sensors which has been installed in November 2003. Precipitation sums and actual evapotranspiration rates are provided by the KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute). Our intention is to continue this hydrological field study over a period of several years for modelling purposes. In Cabauw the most important water budget terms are precipitation, evapotranspiration, inflowing and outflowing discharge and change in storage. Possibly upward seepage from a nearby river should be added to this budget. In winter precipitation is the largest input term and outflowing discharge the largest output term. In summer inflowing discharge is the largest input term and evapotranspiration the largest output term. A detailed analysis of the water budget terms over several years will be presented. http://www.cesar-observatory.nl/
Storage-discharge relationships in a lowland catchment in The Netherlands
Teuling, A.J. ; Brauer, C.C. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. - \ 2012
Effect of forest vegetation on groundwater recharge in Dutch dunes. A lysimeter study from 1941 to 1998
Warmerdam, P.M.M. ; Hoeven, P.C.T. van der; Kole, J.W. ; Stricker, J.N.M. - \ 2012
In: Proceedings of the 14th Euromediterranean Network of Experimental and Representative Basins. - UUNESCO - p. 11 - 14.
Monitoring and profiling with CESAR Observatory
Russchenberg, H. ; Uijlenhoet, R. ; Leijnse, H. ; Brauer, C.C. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Terink, W. ; Boersema, M.P. - \ 2011
Nieuwegein : Programme Office Climate changes Spatial Planning (KvR report KvR 044/11) - ISBN 9789088150364 - 44
klimaatverandering - meteorologische waarnemingen - monitoring - internationale samenwerking - onderzoeksprojecten - climatic change - meteorological observations - international cooperation - research projects
The climate system is complex. Although it is understood in qualitative terms, there are still many physical processes of which the impact on climate change is far from quantifi able. A well-known example of such a process is the interaction between cloud and rainfall formation, aerosols, radiation and the land-atmosphere energy exchange. It is one of the sources of large uncertainty in climate models.
Water balance and dynamics of a Dutch polder catchment
Brauer, C.C. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. - \ 2010
In: Proceedings of the EGU Leonardo Tropical Conference Series on Hhydrological Cycle, Looking at catchments in colors - Debating new ways of generating and filtering information in hydrology, 10-12 November 2010, Luxembourg. - - p. 57 - 57.
Performance of high-resolution X-band radar for rainfall measurement in The Netherlands
Beek, C.Z. van de; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Leijnse, H. ; Uijlenhoet, R. ; Russchenberg, H.W.J. - \ 2010
Does the Hupselse Beek catchment (Netherlands) behave like a simple dynamical system?
Brauer, C.C. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Warmerdam, P.M.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. - \ 2010
In: Proceedings of Looking at Catchments in Colors. Debating New Ways of Generating and Filtering information in Hydrology, 10 - 12 Nov. 2010, Luxembourg. - - p. 43 - 43.
Recession analysis and hydrograph simulation of the Hupselse Beek catchment, the Netherlands
Brauer, C.C. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Warmerdam, P.M.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. - \ 2010
In: Proceedings of the 13th Biennial Conference ERB 2010 on Hydrological Responses of Small Basins to a Changing Environment, Seggau Castle, Austria, September 5-8, 2010. - - p. 129 - 131.
Comparison of evapotranspiration of two forest vegetations. Elaboration of longterm lysimeter data at Castricum, the Netherlands and St. Arnold, Germany
Warmerdam, P.M.M. ; Hoeven, P.C.T. van der; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Brandenburg, M. ; Kole, J.W. - \ 2010
In: Proceedings of the 13th Biennial Conference ERB 2010 on Hydrological Responses of Small Basins to a Changing Environment, Seggau Castle, Austria, September 5-8, 2010. - - p. 123 - 125.
Linking hydrology and meteorology: measuring water balance terms in Cabauw, the Netherlands
Brauer, C.C. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. - \ 2010
In: Proceedings of the 13th Biennial Conference ERB 2010 on Hydrological Responses of Small Basins to a Changing Environment, Seggau Castle, Austria, September 5-8, 2010. - - p. 13 - 16.
Climate models need information about energy and water fluxes at the soil surface. In Cabauw (Netherlands) these fluxes and the belonging balances are measured. Water balances have been set up for a summer and a winter period to check the correctness of these fluxes. In winter precipitation is the largest input term and outflowing discharge the highest output term. In summer inflowing discharge is the largest input term and evapotranspiration the highest output term
Performance of high-resolution X-band radar for rainfall measurement in the Netherlands
Beek, C.Z. van de; Leijnsel, H. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. ; Russchenberg, H.W.J. - \ 2010
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 14 (2010)2. - ISSN 1027-5606 - p. 205 - 221.
neerslag - regen - meteorologische waarnemingen - hydrologische gegevens - gegevensanalyse - precipitation - rain - meteorological observations - hydrological data - data analysis - weather radar - nonprecipitating echoes - size distribution - mountainous area - reflectivity - attenuation - hydrology - calibration - retrieval
This study presents an analysis of 195 rainfall events gathered with the X-band weather radar SOLIDAR and a tipping bucket rain gauge network near Delft, The Netherlands, between May 1993 and April 1994. The aim of this paper is to present a thorough analysis of a climatological dataset using a high spatial (120 m) and temporal (16 s) resolution X-band radar. This makes it a study of the potential for high-resolution rainfall measurements with non-polarimetric X-band radar over flat terrain. An appropriate radar reflectivity – rain rate relation is derived from measurements of raindrop size distributions and compared with radar – rain gauge data. The radar calibration is assessed using a long-term comparison of rain gauge measurements with corresponding radar reflectivities as well as by analyzing the evolution of the stability of ground clutter areas over time. Three different methods for ground clutter correction as well as the effectiveness of forward and backward attenuation correction algorithms have been studied. Five individual rainfall events are discussed in detail to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of high-resolution X-band radar and the effectiveness of the presented correction methods. X-band radar is found to be able to measure the space-time variation of rainfall at high resolution, far greater than what can be achieved by rain gauge networks or a typical operational C-band weather radar. On the other hand, SOLIDAR can suffer from receiver saturation, wet radome attenuation as well as signal loss along the path. During very strong convective situations the signal can even be lost completely. In combination with several rain gauges for quality control, high resolution X-band radar is considered to be suitable for rainfall monitoring over relatively small (urban) catchments. These results offer great prospects for the new high resolution polarimetric doppler X-band radar IDRA
Fundamental hydrological research results drawn from studies in small catchments
Warmerdam, P.M.M. ; Stricker, J.N.M. - \ 2009
In: Proceedings of the International Workshop on Status and Perspectives of Hydrology in Small Basins, Goslar-Hahnenklee, Germany, 30 March - 2 April 2009. - Wallingford : IAHS (IAHS publication 336) - ISBN 9781907161087 - p. 47 - 54.
The history of research in small experimental and representative catchments in the 20th century is briefly displayed, in particular with regard to water quantity experiments. The early studies up to about the 1960s dealt with impacts of forest cover on runoff volumes and peak flow rates, but did not explain why catchments responded as they did. Stimulated by the IHD of UNESCO, as from the 1960s numerous small research catchments have been set up for process studies to enhance the understanding of the hydrological behaviour of catchments. Although initially only precipitation and runoff could be measured, the technological developments in the 1970s opened the road for collecting time series of actual evaporation and soil moisture estimates. Many catchments studies have been conducted on runoff generation using e.g. isotope information of the various flow components contributing to flood events. These and many other studies in small experimental and representative catchments have much contributed to a better understanding of the hydrological processes and to improved hydrological modelling.
Performance of high-resolution X-band radar for rainfall measurements in the Netherlands
Beek, C.Z. van de; Leijnse, H. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. ; Russchenberg, H.W.J. - \ 2009
Recession analysis of the Hupselse Beek catchment, the Netherlands
Brauer, C.C. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Warmerdam, P.M.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. - \ 2009
Linking meteorology and hydrology: measuring water balance terms in Cabauw, the Netherlands
Brauer, C.C. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. - \ 2009
waterbalans - hydrologie - meting - water balance - hydrology - measurement
Climate models need information about energy and water fluxes at the soil surface. In Cabauw (Netherlands) these fluxes and the belonging balances are measured. Water balances have been set up for a summer and a winter period to check the correctness of these fluxes. In winter precipitation is the largest input term and outflowing discharge the highest output term. In summer inflowing discharge is the largest input term and evapotranspiration the highest output term.
An intercomparison of X-band radar with rain gauges in the Netherlands
Beek, C.Z. van de; Leijnse, H. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. ; Russchenberg, H.W.J. - \ 2008
Impact of parameters, forcing, and model structure on soil moisture and water fluxes in a land surface scheme of reduced complexity
Teuling, A.J. ; Uijlenhoet, R. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Seneviratne, S.I. - \ 2008
Performance of high-resolution X-band radar for rain measurement in The Netherlands evaluated using a multi-year data set
Beek, C.Z. van de; Leijnse, H. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Uijlenhoet, R. ; Russchenberg, H.W.J. - \ 2008
Measurement and parameterization of rainfall microstructure
Uijlenhoet, R. ; Leijnse, H. ; Stricker, J.N.M. ; Berne, A.D. - \ 2008
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