Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    “I prepared my own carrots”. The effect of participation in an out-of-home cooking session on Dutch 4–6-year-old children's vegetable consumption
    Zeinstra, Gertrude G. ; Vrijhof, Milou ; Kremer, Stefanie - \ 2020
    Food Quality and Preference 86 (2020). - ISSN 0950-3293
    Children's eating behaviour - Healthy diet - Intervention strategies - Involvement - Vegetable intake

    Involvement in vegetable preparation is thought to be an effective strategy to increase children's vegetable intake, but the evidence from experimental studies is scarce. A between-subject experiment was executed in a restaurant setting to investigate the effect of participation in vegetable preparation on 4–6-year-old children's vegetable intake. After a baseline evening meal, intervention children (N = 50) participated in a vegetable preparation session together with an enthusiastic chef. Control children (N = 51) participated in small groups in a book-reading activity. Subsequently, they ate an evening meal. Follow-up sessions at one month and three months were included to assess possible longer-term effects. Vegetable intake was the main outcome. Secondary outcomes were vegetable choice and involvement in food-related activities at home. For all four sessions, children's vegetable intake ranged between 50 and 60 g in both conditions (p > 0.05). Participation in carrot preparation did not increase children's vegetable intake. Involvement in food-related activities at home remained stable in the intervention group, whereas it decreased slightly in the control group (p = 0.01). A cluster analysis identified four distinct vegetable eating patterns over time, suggesting that there are different segments of children. To conclude, participating once in an out-of-home vegetable preparation session with an enthusiastic chef did not influence children's intake of a familiar vegetable, but it may support their general involvement in food-related activities at home.

    Onderzoek: hoe leer je kinderen groente eten
    Zeinstra, Gertrude - \ 2020
    Drivers, barriers and interventions for food waste behaviour change: a food system approach
    Zeinstra, Gertrude ; Haar, Sandra van der; Bergen, Geertje van - \ 2020
    Wageningen : Wageningen Food & Biobased Research (Report / Wageningen Food & Biobased Research 2011) - ISBN 9789463952774 - 32
    Cross-national differences in child food neophobia : A comparison of five European countries
    Proserpio, C. ; Almli, V.L. ; Sandvik, P. ; Sandell, M. ; Methven, L. ; Wallner, M. ; Jilani, H. ; Zeinstra, G.G. ; Alfaro, B. ; Laureati, M. - \ 2020
    Food Quality and Preference 81 (2020). - ISSN 0950-3293
    Childhood - Cross-cultural differences - Food rejection - Healthy eating

    Food neophobia (FN) has been extensively explored, especially in children. However, very few studies have compared this food behavior in children from different countries. Considering the clear diversity between European countries in feeding practices and food consumption, it is important to deepen the understanding of cross-national differences in child FN. The aim of this study was to explore and compare FN in five European countries (Finland, Italy, Spain, Sweden and UK) using a food neophobia scale specifically designed for children. Five hundred and twenty-nine children (54% girls) aged 9–12 years were recruited from schools in each country and were asked to complete the Italian Child Food Neophobia Scale (ICFNS, Laureati, Bergamaschi et al., 2015), which was translated into each respective language. Parents (n ≈ 300) completed a food consumption frequency questionnaire for their child, and provided background information. Reliability of the tool was assessed through internal consistency and temporal stability. Total internal consistency was 0.76. When calculated by country, internal consistency was satisfactory (Cronbach's alpha >0.70) for all countries. FN was negatively associated to fruit and vegetable consumption, liking of wholegrain biscuits, and timing of introduction of semi-solid food. There were small but significant cross-national differences in FN with British and Swedish children being the most neophobic and significantly higher in FN than Finnish children, who were the most neophilic. Results indicate that the tool can be successfully used in all the tested countries with children in the age range of 9–12 years. The tool can be useful to measure the effects of interventions aiming at changing food behaviors, such as reducing FN, among children.

    Individual differences in texture preferences among European children: Development and validation of the Child Food Texture Preference Questionnaire (CFTPQ)
    Laureati, M. ; Sandvik, P. ; Almli, V.L. ; Sandell, M. ; Zeinstra, G.G. ; Methven, L. ; Wallner, M. ; Jilani, H. ; Alfaro, B. ; Proserpio, C. - \ 2020
    Food Quality and Preference 80 (2020). - ISSN 0950-3293
    Cross-cultural - Food neophobia - Food preferences - Texture-liker status - Young consumer

    Texture has an important role in children's acceptance and rejection of food. However, little is known about individual differences in texture preference. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a child-friendly tool to explore individual differences in texture preferences in school-aged children from six European countries (Austria, Finland, Italy, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom). Six hundred and ten children aged 9–12 years and their parents participated in a cross-sectional study. Children completed the Child Food Texture Preference Questionnaire (CFTPQ) and a Food Neophobia Scale (FNS). The CFTPQ consisted in asking children to choose the preferred item within 17 pairs of pictures of food varying in texture (hard vs. soft or smooth vs. lumpy). Children also evaluated all food items for familiarity. Parents completed the CFTPQ regarding their preferred items, a food frequency questionnaire for their child, and provided background information. For a subset of children, a re-test was done for the CFTPQ and FNS to assess reliability. The results showed that the tool was child-friendly, had high test-retest reliability, and identified country-related differences as well as segments of children with different texture preferences (hard- vs. soft-likers). These segments differed in consumption frequency of healthy foods, and in food neophobia.

    Strategieën voor verhoging groenteconsumptie van kinderen
    Zeinstra, Gertrude - \ 2019

    Nederlandse kinderen eten te weinig groente. Een van de oorzaken is dat kinderen een lage voorkeur hebben voor groente (1), zeker in vergelijking met andere voedingsmiddelen. Maar iets lekker vinden, kun je leren!

    Dit artikel komt uit de printuitgave van Voeding Nu 4.

    The potential of ICT tools in changing consumers’ food waste behaviour
    Haar, S. van der; Zeinstra, G.G. ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Vogels, J.W.P.M. ; Bos-Brouwers, H.E.J. - \ 2019
    The potential of ICT tools in changing consumers’ food waste behaviour
    Haar, S. van der; Zeinstra, G.G. ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Vogels, J.W.P.M. ; Bos-Brouwers, H.E.J. - \ 2019
    Bedrijfsleven opgeroepen samen op te trekken bij voedseleducatie
    Zeinstra, Gertrude - \ 2019
    Groente & fruit op in de ochtendpauze op school
    Zeinstra, Gertrude - \ 2019
    Wonkey veggies and customer preference at JUMBO supermarket
    Zeinstra, G.G. ; Haar, S. van der - \ 2019
    REFRESH
    Groente en fruit op school, vanzelfsprekend!
    Zeinstra, Gertrude - \ 2019
    Too Good To Go concept contributes to less food waste from stores and at home
    Zeinstra, G.G. ; Haar, S. van der - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Wageningen Food & Biobased Research
    Van patatzak naar fruitbak
    Zeinstra, Gertrude - \ 2019
    Results of the E3S B-Tex study: Relationship between BMI, fibre intake and texture preferences in Austrian and UK children
    Wallner, M. ; Gruber, Raphaela Stefanie ; Jilani, H. ; Laureati, Monica ; Almli, Valérie Lengard ; Sandell, M. ; Zeinstra, Gertrude - \ 2019
    Cross-national differences in children food neophobia: a comparison of six European countries
    Laureati, Monica ; Proserpio, Cristina ; Jiménez-Alfaro, B. ; Almli, Valérie Lengard ; Jilani, H. ; Methven, L. ; Sandell, M. ; Sandvik, P. ; Wallner, M. ; Zeinstra, G.G. - \ 2019
    Application of the Check-All-That-Apply (CATA) method to explore sensory perception in children with different degrees of food neophobia
    Sandvik, P. ; Almli, Valérie Lengard ; Jimenez-Alfaro, B. ; Jilani, H. ; Laureati, Monica ; Methven, L. ; Sandell, M. ; Wallner, M. ; Zeinstra, Gertrude - \ 2019
    The potential of apps in changing consumers’ food waste behaviour
    Haar, S. van der; Zeinstra, G.G. ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Vogels, J.W.P.M. ; Bos-Brouwers, H.E.J. - \ 2019
    WUR: Too Good To Go is effectief instrument tegen voedselverspilling
    Stroosnijder, Sanne ; Haar, Sandra van der; Zeinstra, Gertrude ; Timmermans, Toine - \ 2019
    The impact of Too Good To Go on food waste reduction at the consumer household level : An explorative study
    Haar, Sandra van der; Zeinstra, Gertrude G. - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Wageningen Food & Biobased Research (Report / Wageningen Food & Biobased Research 1975) - ISBN 9789463951494 - 44
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