Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Records 1 - 7 / 7

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export

      Export search results

    Check title to add to marked list
    Supplementary data: Roles and contribution of tomato WRKY genes to salt stress and powdery mildew resistance
    Kissoudis, C. ; Gao, D. ; Pramanik, Dewi ; Birhanu, Mengistu ; Wiel, C.C.M. van de; Visser, R.G.F. ; Bai, Y. ; Linden, C.G. van der - \ 2016
    Wageningen UR
    solanum lycopersicum - tomatoes - disease resistance - stress tolerance - defence mechanisms - plant diseases - abiotic injuries - stress response - phenotypic variation - genetic analysisplant breeding - salt tolerance
    WRKY is a transcription factor family unique to plants with diverse functions in defense pathways, abiotic stress tolerance and developmental programs. Family members are characterized by the conserved WRKY domain and significant sequence variation in the remainder of the protein, which is translated into distinct functions even for closely related genes. We utilized the extensive functional characterization of the Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY family to identify tomato homologues of Arabidopsis WRKY genes that are involved in defense responses (AtWRKY 11, 29, 48, 70 and 72). In total 13 tomato WRKY homologues were identified for these genes, of which 9 were successfully over-expressed, and 12 stably silenced via RNAi in transgenic tomato lines. The transgenic lines were evaluated for their response to salt stress, powdery mildew resistance and the combination of these stresses. Lines overexpressing SlWRKY11 and SlWRKY23, and RNAi lines of SlWRKY7 and SlWRKY9 showed both increased biomass and improved salt tolerance. For SlWRKY11 and SlWRKY23 overexpression (OE) lines, this was accompanied by a moderate increase in oxidative stress tolerance. The SlWRKY6-OE line showed strongly improved salt stress tolerance, but a growth penalty under control conditions. Exceptional phenotypes were observed for the SlWRKY10-OE line (stunted growth) and the RNAi line SlWRKY23-RNAi (necrotic symptoms), but these phenotypes were partly restored to normal under salt stress. Both these lines exhibited increased resistance to powdery mildew, but this was compromised when the plants were put under salt-stress as well. Important functions for tomato WRKY genes were revealed in both the abiotic and biotic stress response and several genes should be further explored to elucidate their downstream regulatory functions that lead to increased stress tolerance.
    Natural loss-of-function mutation of EDR1 conferring resistance to tomato powdery mildew in Arabidopsis thaliana accession C24
    Gao, D. ; Appiano, M. ; Huibers, R.P. ; Loonen, A.E.H.M. ; Visser, R.G.F. ; Wolters, A.M.A. ; Bai, Y. - \ 2015
    Molecular Plant Pathology 16 (2015)1. - ISSN 1464-6722 - p. 71 - 82.
    salicylic-acid - downy mildew - gene - defense - plants - microsatellites - mechanism - evolution - cloning - kinase
    To screen for potentially novel types of resistance to tomato powdery mildew Oidium neolycopersici, a disease assay was performed on 123 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. Forty accessions were fully resistant, and one, C24, was analysed in detail. By quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of an F2 population derived from C24 × Sha (susceptible accession), two QTLs associated with resistance were identified in C24. Fine mapping of QTL-1 on chromosome 1 delimited the region to an interval of 58¿kb encompassing 15 candidate genes. One of these was Enhanced Disease Resistance 1 (EDR1). Evaluation of the previously obtained edr1 mutant of Arabidopsis accession Col-0, which was identified because of its resistance to powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum, showed that it also displayed resistance to O.¿neolycopersici. Sequencing of EDR1 in our C24 germplasm (referred to as C24-W) revealed two missing nucleotides in the second exon of EDR1 resulting in a premature stop codon. Remarkably, C24 obtained from other laboratories does not contain the EDR1 mutation. To verify the identity of C24-W, a DNA region containing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) unique to C24 was sequenced showing that C24-W contains the C24-specific nucleotide. C24-W showed enhanced resistance to O.¿neolycopersici compared with C24 not containing the edr1 mutation. Furthermore, C24-W displayed a dwarf phenotype, which was not associated with the mutation in EDR1 and was not caused by the differential accumulation of pathogenesis-related genes. In conclusion, we identified a natural edr1 mutant in the background of C24.
    Activation tagging of ATHB13 in Arabidopsis thaliana confers broad-spectrum disease resistance
    Gao, D. ; Huibers, R.P. ; Chen, X. ; Loonen, A.E.H.M. ; Visser, R.G.F. ; Wolters, A.M.A. ; Bai, Y. - \ 2014
    Plant Molecular Biology 86 (2014)6. - ISSN 0167-4412 - p. 641 - 653.
    vegetative storage protein - powdery mildew resistance - transcription factors hahb1 - nudix hydrolase - salicylic-acid - plant defense - cell-death - hd-zip - oidium-neolycopersici - expression patterns
    Powdery mildew species Oidium neolycopersici (On) can cause serious yield losses in tomato production worldwide. Besides on tomato, On is able to grow and reproduce on Arabidopsis. In this study we screened a collection of activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutants and identified one mutant, 3221, which displayed resistance to On, and in addition showed a reduced stature and serrated leaves. Additional disease tests demonstrated that the 3221 mutant exhibited resistance to downy mildew (Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis) and green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), but retained susceptibility to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. The resistance trait and morphological alteration were mutually linked in 3221. Identification of the activation tag insertion site and microarray analysis revealed that ATHB13, a homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factor, was constitutively overexpressed in 3221. Silencing of ATHB13 in 3221 resulted in the loss of both the morphological alteration and resistance, whereas overexpression of the cloned ATHB13 in Col-0 and Col-eds1-2 backgrounds resulted in morphological alteration and resistance. Microarray analysis further revealed that overexpression of ATHB13 influenced the expression of a large number of genes. Previously, it was reported that ATHB13-overexpressing lines conferred tolerance to abiotic stress. Together with our results, it appears that ATHB13 is involved in the crosstalk between abiotic and biotic stress resistance pathways.
    Identification of genes affecting the response of tomato and Arabidopsis upon powdery mildew infection
    Gao, D. - \ 2014
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Richard Visser, co-promotor(en): Yuling Bai; Anne-Marie Wolters. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462570122 - 144
    solanum lycopersicum - tomaten - arabidopsis thaliana - plantenziekteverwekkende schimmels - oidium neolycopersici - genen - ziekteresistentie - wilde verwanten - mutanten - genexpressie - plantenveredeling - solanum lycopersicum - tomatoes - arabidopsis thaliana - plant pathogenic fungi - oidium neolycopersici - genes - disease resistance - wild relatives - mutants - gene expression - plant breeding

    Many plant species are hosts of powdery mildew fungi, including Arabidopsis and economically important crops such as wheat, barley and tomato. Resistance has been explored using induced mutagenesis and natural variation in the plant species. The isolated genes encompass loss-of-function susceptibility genes and dominantly inherited genes encoding NB-LRR proteins, receptor-like kinases or proteins that do not have typical resistance protein domains. Cultivated tomato is susceptible to powdery mildew species Oidium neolycopersici, and exploiting the resistance genes present in wild tomato species is a favourable strategy to control the disease. In chapter 2, we give an overview of all the identified resistance genes in wild tomato species and their resistance mechanisms inferred from cytological and molecular data. Furthermore, resistance genes and their mechanisms are compared between tomato and other plant species, such as dicot Arabidopsis and monocots barley and wheat. This comparison illustrates that both common and species-specific mechanisms are involved with respect to resistance to powdery mildews in different plant species.

    Resistance gene Ol-1 originates from wild tomato species S. habrochaites. It confers race-non-specific resistance to tomato powdery mildew. To elucidate the resistance signalling pathway, we adopted a virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach to suppress genes which are differentially expressed when comparing genotypes with and without the Ol-1 introgression. In chapter 3, we showed that ALS (acetolactate synthase) activity is important for Ol-1-mediated resistance, as simultaneous silencing of two ALS genes attenuated the resistance level of NIL-Ol-1. ALS is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of branched-chain amino acids, and a target of commercial herbicides. Reducing ALS activity via herbicidal treatment did not result in altered responses to powdery mildew infection in susceptible cultivar Moneymaker and resistant line NIL-Ol-4, indicating that ALS is not involved in basal defense nor in NB-LRR gene-mediated resistance. Whether the role of ALS in Ol-1-mediated resistance is associated with amino acid homeostasis is unknown and needs further investigation.

    Besides tomato, Arabidopsis is a host of powdery mildew O. neolycopersici. The large collection of Arabidopsis accessions and several mutant collections are valuable resources to identify novel resistance genes. In chapter 4, we first screened 123 Arabidopsis accessions for O. neolycopersici resistance and then studied the genetic basis of theresistance by segregation analysis in 19 F2 populations. The results showed that polygenic resistance is the main form of resistance. Accession C24 displays complete resistance with polygenic nature, as shown by QTL analysis of the F2 population derived from the cross between C24 and susceptible accession Sha. The recessively inherited locus on chromosome 1 was fine-mapped by recombinant screening, and analysis of candidate genes resulted in the isolation of the gene conferring resistance. It proved to be a mutant allele of EDR1, harbouring a deletion upstream of the kinase domain resulting in a truncated protein. Previously, an induced edr1mutationin Col-0 background was obtained. However, the edr1 mutation in our C24 source (referred to as C24-W) occurred in a different position. The resistance conferred by edr1 in C24-W was not associated with constitutively expressed pathogenesis-related genes. Remarkably, we observed that although C24-W carried the edr1 mutation this mutation was absent in other C24 sources. In addition, C24-W was smaller in size than C24 from other sources. Since the edr1 mutation confers resistance to tomato powdery mildew in Arabidopsis, we investigated whether this resistance system is conserved in tomato. The results showed that individual silencing of two tomato EDR1 candidate genes in susceptible cultivar Moneymaker did not result in decreased sporulation of tomato powdery mildew.

    In chapter 5, we screened an activation tag Arabidopsis mutant collection. In these mutants, tagged genes are overexpressed by the strong 35S enhancers resulting in a dominant gain-of-function phenotype. One mutant line, 3221, was identified due to its resistance to powdery mildew O. neolycopersici. Additional disease tests showed that 3221 displayed resistance to the downy mildew Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and the aphid Myzus persicae, but susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. The mutant line 3221 also showed reduced size and serrated leaves, and the altered morphology was associated with resistance. Inverse PCR and expression analysis revealed that the gene underlying the resistance was ATHB13, a HD-Zip transcription factor. Suppression ofATHB13 in 3221 by RNAi transformation resulted in the loss of resistance and altered morphology, while overexpression of ATHB13 in wild-type plants induced resistance and altered morphology. Microarray analysis of 3221 and the parental line Ws resulted in the identification of a large number of genes showing differential expression. Analysis of these results did not give a clear indication that the resistance phenotype in 3221 is due to the activation of classical hormone pathway genes involved in resistance. The possibility of utilizing ATHB13 for engineering pathogen resistance in tomato needs to be investigated in the future.

    Finally, in chapter 6 the results from the previous chapters are discussed in a broader context.

    Genetics and molecular mechanisms of resistance to powdery mildews in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and its wild relatives
    Seifi Abdolabad, A.R. ; Dongli Gao, Dongli ; Zheng, Z. ; Pavan, S.N.C. ; Faino, L. ; Visser, R.G.F. ; Wolters, A.M.A. ; Bai, Y. - \ 2014
    European Journal of Plant Pathology 138 (2014)3. - ISSN 0929-1873 - p. 641 - 665.
    plant-pathogen interactions - hypersensitive cell-death - rna silencing suppressors - multiple fungal pathogens - race-specific resistance - leucine-rich repeat - oidium-neolycopersici - disease resistance - abscisic-acid - salicylic-acid
    Powdery mildews (PMs) cause disease in a wide range of plant species including important crops. Taking tomato as an example, here we review findings on the genetic basis and mechanisms of plant resistance to PMs. First, we present a summary of our research on tomato resistance to two PM species, with the focus on Oidium neolycopersici. We discuss the genetics of resistance to this pathogen in tomato. Then, we compare different forms of resistance mediated by different resistance genes based on molecular and cytological data. Also, we provide a comparison between these resistance genes in tomato with those in barley, Arabidopsis and wheat, in order to present a model for the genetic basis of resistance to PMs in plants. We try to accommodate these resistance mechanisms in the current model of plant innate immunity. At the end we discuss possibilities to translate these findings to practical approaches in breeding for resistance to PMs in crops.
    Down-regulation of acetolactate synthase compromises OI-1- mediated resistance to powdery mildew in tomato
    Gao, D. ; Huibers, R.P. ; Loonen, A.E.H.M. ; Visser, R.G.F. ; Wolters, A.M.A. ; Bai, Y. - \ 2014
    BMC Plant Biology 14 (2014). - ISSN 1471-2229 - 11 p.
    glutamate-dehydrogenase gene - acetohydroxyacid synthase - monogenic-resistance - defense responses - nicotiana-tabacum - ol-genes - arabidopsis - plants - inhibition - biosynthesis
    Background - In a cDNA-AFLP analysis comparing transcript levels between powdery mildew (Oidium neolycopersici)-susceptible tomato cultivar Moneymaker (MM) and near isogenic lines (NILs) carrying resistance gene Ol-1 or Ol-4, a transcript-derived fragment (TDF) M11E69-195 was found to be present in NIL-Ol-1 but absent in MM and NIL-Ol-4. This TDF shows homology to acetolactate synthase (ALS). ALS is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of branched-chain amino acids valine, leucine and isoleucine, and it is also a target of commercial herbicides. Results - Three ALS homologs ALS1, ALS2, ALS3 were identified in the tomato genome sequence. ALS1 and ALS2 show high similarity, whereas ALS3 is more divergent. Transient silencing of both ALS1 and ALS2 in NIL-Ol-1 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) resulted in chlorotic leaf areas that showed increased susceptibility to O. neolycopersici (On). VIGS results were confirmed by stable transformation of NIL-Ol-1 using an RNAi construct targeting both ALS1 and ALS2. In contrast, silencing of the three ALS genes individually by RNAi constructs did not compromise the resistance of NIL-Ol-1. Application of the herbicide chlorsulfuron to NIL-Ol-1 mimicked the VIGS phenotype and caused loss of its resistance to On. Susceptible MM and On-resistant line NIL-Ol-4 carrying a nucleotide binding site and leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) resistance gene were also treated with chlorsulfuron. Neither the susceptibility of MM nor the resistance of NIL-Ol-4 was affected. Conclusions - ALS is neither involved in basal defense, nor in resistance conferred by NB-LRR type resistance genes. Instead, it is specifically involved in Ol-1-mediated resistance to tomato powdery mildew, suggesting that ALS-induced change in amino acid homeostasis is important for resistance conferred by Ol-1.
    Powdery Mildew Resistance in Tomato by Impairment of SIPMR4 and SIDMR1
    Huibers, R.P. ; Loonen, A.E.H.M. ; Dongli Gao, Dongli ; Ackerveken, G. van den; Visser, R.G.F. ; Bai, Y. - \ 2013
    PLoS ONE 8 (2013)6. - ISSN 1932-6203
    zinc-finger nucleases - disease resistance - arabidopsis mutants - targeted mutagenesis - gene - plants - pathogenesis - mutation
    Genetic dissection of disease susceptibility in Arabidopsis to powdery and downy mildew has identified multiple susceptibility (S) genes whose impairment results in disease resistance. Although several of these S-genes have been cloned and characterized in more detail it is unknown to which degree their function in disease susceptibility is conserved among different plant species. Moreover, it is unclear whether impairment of such genes has potential in disease resistance breeding due to possible fitness costs associated with impaired alleles. Here we show that the Arabidopsis PMR4 and DMR1, genes encoding a callose synthase and homoserine kinase respectively, have functional orthologs in tomato with respect to their S-gene function. Silencing of both genes using RNAi resulted in resistance to the tomato powdery mildew fungus Oidium neolycopersici. Resistance to O. neolycopersici by SlDMR1 silencing was associated with severely reduced plant growth whereas SlPMR4 silencing was not. SlPMR4 is therefore a suitable candidate gene as target for mutagenesis to obtain alleles that can be deployed in disease resistance breeding of tomato.
    Check title to add to marked list

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.