Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Major threats of pollution and climate change to global coastal ecosystems and enhanced management for sustainability
Lu, Y. ; Yuan, J. ; Lu, X. ; Su, Chao ; Zhang, Y. ; Wang, C. ; Cao, X. ; Li, Q. ; Su, Jilan ; Ittekkot, Venugopalan ; Garbutt, Richard Angus ; Bush, S.R. ; Fletcher, Stephen ; Wagey, Tonny ; Kachur, Anatolii ; Sweijd, Neville - \ 2018
Environmental Pollution 239 (2018). - ISSN 0269-7491 - p. 670 - 680.
coastal ecosystem - marine pollution - climate change - ecological impacts - coastal sustainability
Coastal zone is of great importance in the provision of various valuable ecosystem services. However, it is also sensitive and vulnerable to environmental changes due to high human populations and interactions between the land and ocean. Major threats of pollution from over enrichment of nutrients, increasing metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and climate change have led to severe ecological degradation in the coastal zone, while few studies have focused on the combined impacts of pollution and climate change on the coastal ecosystems at the global level. A global overview of nutrients, metals, POPs, and major environmental changes due to climate change and their impacts on coastal ecosystems was carried out in this study. Coasts of the Eastern Atlantic and Western Pacific were hotspots of concentrations of several pollutants, and mostly affected by warming climate. These hotspots shared the same features of large populations, heavy industry and (semi-) closed sea. Estimation of coastal ocean capital, integrated management of land-ocean interaction in the coastal zone, enhancement of integrated global observation system, and coastal ecosystem-based management can play effective roles in promoting sustainable management of coastal marine ecosystems. Enhanced management from the perspective of mitigating pollution and climate change was proposed.
The Tip of the ‘‘Celiac Iceberg’’ in China: A Systematic Review and meta-Analysis
Yuan, J. ; Gao, J. ; Li, Xin ; Liu, F. ; Wijmenga, C. ; Chen, H. ; Gilissen, L.J.W.J. - \ 2013
PLoS ONE 8 (2013)12. - ISSN 1932-6203 - 14 p.
gene-frequencies - disease - wheat - prevalence - hla - populations - patient - people - risk
Methods - By searching the MEDLINE database and four Chinese full-text databases (CNKI, CBM, VIP and WANFANG) (up to August 2012), as well as two HLA allele frequency net databases and the Chinese Statistics Yearbook databases, we systematically reviewed the literature on definite and suspected cases of celiac disease, the predisposing HLA allele frequencies, and on gluten exposure in China. Meta-analysis was performed by analyzing DQ2, DQ8 and DQB1*0201 gene frequencies and heterogeneity in populations from different geographic regions and ethnicities in China. Results - At present, the number of reported celiac disease cases is extremely low in China. The frequencies of the HLA-DQ2.5 and HLA-DQ8 haplotypes were 3.4% (95% confidence interval 1.3–5.5%) and 2.1% (0.1–4.1%), respectively. HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 antigen frequencies were 18.4% (15.0–21.7%) and 8.0% (4.5–11.4%), respectively. The frequency of the DQB1*0201 allele was 10.5% (9.3–11.6%) and it was more common in the northern Chinese than in the southern Chinese populations. The chance of being exposed to gluten is rapidly increasing all over China nowadays. Conclusion - The data on HLA haplotyping, in conjunction with increasing wheat consumption, strongly suggests that the occurrence of celiac disease is more common in China than currently reported. Coordinated measures by the Chinese government, medical and agricultural research institutions, and food industries, would be justified to create more awareness about celiac disease and to prevent it becoming a medical and societal burden.
Prions in Variably Protease-Sensitive Prionopathy: An Update
Zou, W.Q. ; Gambetti, P. ; Xiao, X. ; Yuan, J. ; Langeveld, J.P.M. ; Pirisinu, L. - \ 2013
Pathogens 2 (2013)3. - ISSN 2076-0817 - p. 457 - 471.
Human prion diseases, including sporadic, familial, and acquired forms such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), are caused by prions in which an abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) derived from its normal cellular isoform (PrPC) is the only known component. The recently-identified variably protease-sensitive prionopathy (VPSPr) is characterized not only by an atypical clinical phenotype and neuropathology but also by the deposition in the brain of a peculiar PrPSc. Like other forms of human prion disease, the pathogenesis of VPSPr also currently remains unclear. However, the findings of the peculiar features of prions from VPSPr and of the possible association of VPSPr with a known genetic prion disease linked with a valine to isoleucine mutation at residue 180 of PrP reported recently, may be of great importance in enhancing our understanding of not only this atypical human prion disease in particular, but also other prion diseases in general. In this review, we highlight the physicochemical and biological properties of prions from VPSPr and discuss the pathogenesis of VPSPr including the origin and formation of the peculiar prions.
Glycoform-selective prion formation in sporadic and familial forms of prion disease
Xiao, X. ; Yuan, J. ; Haïk, S. ; Cali, I. ; Zhan, Y. ; Moudjou, M. ; Li, B. ; Laplanche, J.L. ; Laude, H. ; Langeveld, J.P.M. ; Gambetti, P. - \ 2013
PLoS ONE 8 (2013)3. - ISSN 1932-6203 - 9 p.
creutzfeldt-jakob-disease - prpsc formation - protein - scrapie - glycosylation - mutation - antibody - cells - susceptibility - conformers
The four glycoforms of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) variably glycosylated at the two N-linked glycosylation sites are converted into their pathological forms (PrP(Sc)) in most cases of sporadic prion diseases. However, a prominent molecular characteristic of PrP(Sc) in the recently identified variably protease-sensitive prionopathy (VPSPr) is the absence of a diglycosylated form, also notable in familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD), which is linked to mutations in PrP either from Val to Ile at residue 180 (fCJD(V180I)) or from Thr to Ala at residue 183 (fCJD(T183A)). Here we report that fCJD(V180I), but not fCJD(T183A), exhibits a proteinase K (PK)-resistant PrP (PrP(res)) that is markedly similar to that observed in VPSPr, which exhibits a five-step ladder-like electrophoretic profile, a molecular hallmark of VPSPr. Remarkably, the absence of the diglycosylated PrP(res) species in both fCJD(V180I) and VPSPr is likewise attributable to the absence of PrP(res) glycosylated at the first N-linked glycosylation site at residue 181, as in fCJD(T183A). In contrast to fCJD(T183A), both VPSPr and fCJD(V180I) exhibit glycosylation at residue 181 on di- and monoglycosylated (mono181) PrP prior to PK-treatment. Furthermore, PrP(V180I) with a typical glycoform profile from cultured cells generates detectable PrP(res) that also contains the diglycosylated PrP in addition to mono- and unglycosylated forms upon PK-treatment. Taken together, our current in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that sporadic VPSPr and familial CJD(V180I) share a unique glycoform-selective prion formation pathway in which the conversion of diglycosylated and mono181 PrP(C) to PrP(Sc) is inhibited, probably by a dominant-negative effect, or by other co-factors.
Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy: a new sporadic disease of the prion protein
Zou, W.Q. ; Puoti, G. ; Xiao, X. ; Yuan, J. ; Qing, L. ; Cali, I. ; Shimoji, M. ; Langeveld, J.P.M. ; Castellani, R. ; Notari, S. ; Crain, B. ; Schmidt, R. ; Geschwind, M. ; DeArmond, S.J. ; Cairns, N. ; Dickson, D. ; Honig, I. ; Torres, J.M. ; Mastrianni, J. ; Capellari, S. ; Giaccone, G. ; Belay, E.D. ; Schonberger, L.B. ; Cohen, M. ; Perry, G. ; Kong, Q. ; Parchi, P. ; Tagliavini, F. ; Gambetti, P. - \ 2010
Annals of Neurology 68 (2010)2. - ISSN 0364-5134 - p. 162 - 172.
creutzfeldt-jakob-disease - gerstmann-straussler-scheinker - codon 129 - prp - cjd - classification - transmission - phenotype - subtypes - brain
Objective: The objective of the study is to report 2 new genotypic forms of protease-sensitive prionopathy (PSPr), a novel prion disease described in 2008, in 11 subjects all homozygous for valine at codon 129 of the prion protein (PrP) gene (129VV). The 2 new PSPr forms affect individuals who are either homozygous for methionine (129MM) or heterozygous for methionine/valine (129MV). Methods: Fifteen affected subjects with 129MM, 129MV, and 129VV underwent comparative evaluation at the National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center for clinical, histopathologic, immunohistochemical, genotypical, and PrP characteristics. Results: Disease duration (between 22 and 45 months) was significantly different in the 129VV and 129MV subjects. Most other phenotypic features along with the PrP electrophoretic profile were similar but distinguishable in the 3 129 genotypes. A major difference laid in the sensitivity to protease digestion of the disease-associated PrP, which was high in 129VV but much lower, or altogether lacking, in 129MV and 129MM. This difference prompted the substitution of the original designation with "variably protease-sensitive prionopathy" (VPSPr). None of the subjects had mutations in the PrP gene coding region. Interpretation: Because all 3 129 genotypes are involved, and are associated with distinguishable phenotypes, VPSPr becomes the second sporadic prion protein disease with this feature after Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, originally reported in 1920. However, the characteristics of the abnormal prion protein suggest that VPSPr is different from typical prion diseases, and perhaps more akin to subtypes of Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease. ANN NEUROL 2010;68:162-172
PrP Conformational Transitions Alter Species Preference of a PrP-specific antibody
Zou, W.Q. ; Langeveld, J.P.M. ; Xiao, X. ; Chen, S. ; McGeer, P.L. ; Yuan, J. ; Payne, M.C. ; Kang, H.E. ; McGeehan, J.M. ; Sy, M.S. ; Greenspan, N.S. ; Kaplan, D. ; Wang, G.X. ; Parchi, P. ; Hoover, E.A. ; Kneale, G. ; Telling, G. ; Surewicz, W. ; Kong, Q. ; Guo, J. - \ 2010
Journal of Biological Chemistry 285 (2010). - ISSN 0021-9258 - p. 13874 - 13884.
creutzfeldt-jakob-disease - pathological prion protein - monoclonal-antibody - n-terminus - scrapie - epitope - binding - brain - recognition - strain
The epitope of the 3F4 antibody most commonly used in human prion disease diagnosis is believed to consist of residues Met-Lys-His-Met (MKHM) corresponding to human PrP-(109–112). This assumption is based mainly on the observation that 3F4 reacts with human and hamster PrP but not with PrP from mouse, sheep, and cervids, in which Met at residue 112 is replaced by Val. Here we report that, by brain histoblotting, 3F4 did not react with PrP of uninfected transgenic mice expressing elk PrP; however, it did show distinct immunoreactivity in transgenic mice infected with chronic wasting disease. Compared with human PrP, the 3F4 reactivity with the recombinant elk PrP was 2 orders of magnitude weaker, as indicated by both Western blotting and surface plasmon resonance. To investigate the molecular basis of these species- and conformer-dependent preferences of 3F4, the epitope was probed by peptide membrane array and antigen competition experiments. Remarkably, the 3F4 antibody did not react with MKHM but reacted strongly with KTNMK (corresponding to human PrP-(106–110)), a sequence that is also present in cervids, sheep, and cattle. 3F4 also reacted with elk PrP peptides containing KTNMKHV. We concluded that the minimal sequence for the 3F4 epitope consists of residues KTNMK, and the species- and conformer-dependent preferences of 3F4 arise largely from the interactions between Met112 (human PrP) or Val115 (cervid PrP) and adjacent residues.
Co-existence of scrapie prion protein types 1 and 2 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: its effect on the phenotype and prion-type characteristics
Cali, I. ; Castellani, R. ; Alshekhlee, A. ; Cohen, Y. ; Blevins, J. ; Yuan, J. ; Langeveld, J.P.M. ; Parchi, P. ; Safar, J.G. ; Zou, W.Q. ; Gambetti, P. - \ 2009
Brain 132 (2009). - ISSN 0006-8950 - p. 2643 - 2658.
monoclonal-antibody - prpsc - strain - cjd - classification - conformations - heterogeneity - determinants - cooccurrence - adaptation
Five phenotypically distinct subtypes have been identified in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), based on the methionine/valine polymorphic genotype of codon 129 of the prion protein (PrP) gene and the presence of either one of the two protease K-resistant scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) types identified as 1 and 2. The infrequent co-existence of both PrPSc types in the same case has been known for a long time. Recently, it has been reported, using type-specific antibodies, that the PrPSc type 1 is present in all cases of sCJD carrying PrPSc type 2. The consistent co-occurrence of both PrPSc types complicates the diagnosis and the current classification of sCJD, and has implications for the pathogenesis of naturally occurring prion diseases. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of PrPSc types 1 and 2 co-occurrence, along with its effects on the disease phenotype and PrPSc strain characteristics, comparatively analysing 34 cases of sCJD, all methionine homozygous at codon 129 of the PrP gene (sCJDMM). To minimize overestimating the prevalence of the sCJDMM cases carrying PrPSc types 1 and 2 (sCJDMM1-2), we used proteinase K concentrations designed to hydrolyse all fragments resulting from an incomplete digestion, while preserving the protease-resistant PrPSc core. Furthermore, we used several antibodies to maximize the detection of both PrPSc types. Our data show that sCJDMM cases associated exclusively with either PrPSc type 1 (sCJDMM1) or PrPSc type 2 (sCJDMM2) do exist; we estimate that they account for approximately 56% and 5% of all the sCJDMM cases, respectively; while in 39% of the cases, both PrPSc types 1 and 2 are present together (sCJDMM1-2) either mixed in the same anatomical region or separate in different regions. Clinically, sCJDMM1-2 had an average disease duration intermediate between the other two sCJDMM subtypes. The histopathology was also intermediate, except for the cerebellum where it resembled that of sCJDMM1. These features, along with the PrP immunostaining pattern, offer a diagnostic clue. We also observed a correlation between the disease duration and the prevalence of PrPSc type 2 and sCJDMM2 phenotypes. The use of different antibodies and of the conformational stability immunoassay indicated that the co-existence of types 1 and 2 in the same anatomical region may confer special conformational characteristics to PrPSc types 1 and 2. All of these findings indicate that sCJDMM1-2 should be considered as a separate entity at this time.
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