Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Responsible innovation by social entrepreneurs: an exploratory study of values integration in innovations
    Lubberink, Rob ; Blok, Vincent ; Ophem, Johan van; Omta, Onno - \ 2019
    Journal of Responsible Innovation 6 (2019)2. - ISSN 2329-9460 - p. 179 - 210.
    civil society - scaling - Social entrepreneurship - social innovation - strategies - value co-creation

    The upcoming concept of responsible innovation seems to gain foothold in Europe and beyond, but it still remains unknown how it can be implemented in the business context. This article explores how social entrepreneurs integrate values into their de facto responsible innovations, and provides empirically informed strategies to develop, implement and scale these innovations. It is based on an empirical investigation of 42 case studies of best-practice social entrepreneurs. This empirical study shows that social entrepreneurs focus on creating direct socio-ethical value for their target beneficiaries. They coordinate collective stakeholder action to develop, implement and scale their systems-changing solutions. And their bottom-up innovations are evaluated and scaled for impact. Ultimately, institutional support is sought to create top-down systems change. This article suggests a synthesised model of integrated strategies for responsible innovation that also covers implementation and scaling of innovation.

    Understanding the Sustainability of Private Development Initiatives : What Kind of Difference Do They Make?
    Kinsbergen, Sara ; Schulpen, Lau ; Ruben, Ruerd - \ 2017
    Forum for Development Studies 44 (2017)2. - ISSN 0803-9410 - p. 223 - 248.
    citizen initiatives - civil society - development aid - effectiveness - sustainability
    In the Netherlands, there is a large group of small-scale, voluntary development organisations, referred to as Private Development Initiatives (PDIs). By classifying PDI interventions based on their potential sustainability, we aim to enhance our understanding of PDIs as alternative development actors and to get insight into the diversity within this group. We rely on detailed data of 49 Dutch PDIs active in Kenya and Indonesia. The classification is based on a combined analysis of both the intervention type (‘what’ they do) and the intervention manner (‘how’ they work) of PDI activities. This results in a typology that outlines the potential sustainability of PDI intervention strategies. We find that diversity regarding the potential sustainability of PDI interventions is large. Whereas several organisational characteristics influence the choice of the intervention strategy (e.g. independence local partner, budget), intrinsic drivers such as motivation and the personal or professional background of PDI members tend to be of great influence for the potential sustainability of the intervention strategies adopted by the PDIs.
    Le mouvement des femmes au Sud-Kivu, République démocratique du Congo : Une analyse de la société civile
    Hilhorst, Thea ; Bashwira Nyenyezi, M.R. - \ 2016
    Wageningen : Wageningen University, Wageningen UR (Publication occasionelle 11) - 79
    women - woman and society - organizations - gender relations - grassroots organizations - civil society - congo democratic republic - east africa - vrouwen - vrouw en samenleving - organisaties - man-vrouwrelaties - grassroots organisaties - maatschappelijk middenveld - democratische republiek kongo - oost-afrika
    The report is the result of a research among women's organisations in the civil society of South-Kivu.
    ADAA end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Jacobs, J. ; Terefa, W. ; Getaw, H. ; Getu, D. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-030) - 70
    agricultural development - development projects - civil society - society - empowerment - ethiopia - east africa - africa - landbouwontwikkeling - ontwikkelingsprojecten - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ethiopië - oost-afrika - afrika
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the African Development Aid Organisation (ADAA) that is a partner of Stichting Kinderpostzegels Nederland (SKN). It assesses ADAA’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Ethiopia and it uses the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which ADAA contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain OSSA’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Education for Development Association (EfDA) end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Jacobs, J. ; Hofstede, M. ; Terefa, W. ; Getaw, H. ; Getu, D. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-073) - 60
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - ethiopia - east africa - africa - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - ethiopië - oost-afrika - afrika
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Ethiopian Education for Development Association (EfDA) that is a partner of Edukans Foundation under the Connect4Change (C4C) Consortium. It assesses EfDA’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Ethiopia and it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which EfDA contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain EfDA’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    EKHC end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Jacobs, J. ; Terefa, W. ; Getaw, H. ; Getu, D. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-033) - 78
    rural development - civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - ethiopia - east africa - africa - plattelandsontwikkeling - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - ethiopië - oost-afrika - afrika
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of Ethiopian Kale Heywit Church (EKHC) in Ethiopia is a partner of Tear Fund Netherlands under the ICCO Alliance. It assesses EKHC’s efforts to strengthening Civil Society in Ethiopia based upon the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which EKHC contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain EKHC’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Ethiopian Rural Self-Help Association (ERSHA) end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Hofstede, M. ; Terefa, W. ; Getaw, H. ; Getu, D. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (CDI Rapporten CDI-15-072) - 58
    rural development - self help - groups - society - civil society - empowerment - ethiopia - east africa - africa - plattelandsontwikkeling - zelfhulp - groepen - samenleving - maatschappelijk middenveld - ethiopië - oost-afrika - afrika
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Ethiopian Rural Self-Help Association (ERSHA) that is a partner of ICCO and IICD under the Connect4Change (C4C) Consortium. It assesses ERSHA’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Ethiopia based upon the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which ERSHA contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain ERSHA’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    JeCCDO end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Jacobs, J. ; Terefa, W. ; Getaw, H. ; Getu, D. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-070) - 70
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - ethiopia - east africa - africa - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - ethiopië - oost-afrika - afrika
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Jerusalem Children and Community Development Organisation (JeCCDO) that is a partner of Edukans Foundation under the ICCO alliance. It assesses JeCCDO’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Ethiopia using the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which JeCCDO contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain JeCCDO’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    MKC-RDA end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Jacobs, J. ; Terefa, W. ; Getaw, H. ; Getu, D. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-069) - 70
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - ethiopia - east africa - africa - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - ethiopië - oost-afrika - afrika
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of Meserete Kristos Church – Relief and Development Association (MKC-RDA) in Ethiopia is a partner of Tear Fund and ICCO under the ICCO Alliance. It assesses MKC-RDA’s efforts to strengthening Civil Society in Ethiopia and for this exercise it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which EKHC contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain EKHC’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    OSSA end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Jacobs, J. ; Terefa, W. ; Getaw, H. ; Getu, D. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-019) - 75
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - ethiopia - east africa - africa - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - ethiopië - oost-afrika - afrika
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Ethiopian Organisation for Social Services for AIDS (OSSA) that is a partner of Cordaid. It assesses OSSA’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Ethiopia using the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which OSSA contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain OSSA’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    RiPPLE end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Jacobs, J. ; Terefa, W. ; Getaw, H. ; Getu, D. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-028) - 20
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - ethiopia - east africa - africa - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - ethiopië - oost-afrika - afrika
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Research Inspired Policy and Practice Learning in Ethiopia and the Nile Region (RiPPLE) that is a partner of the WASH alliance. It assesses RiPPLE’s efforts towards strengthening Civil Society in Ethiopia and it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which RiPPLE contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain RiPPLE’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Endline report – Ethiopia, Amref MFS II country evaluations
    Ingen, T. van; Kusters, C.S.L. ; Buizer, N.N. ; Zerfu, E. ; Kefyalew, D. ; Getu, D. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-031) - 112
    development - community development - development cooperation - evaluation - ethiopia - netherlands - poverty - social participation - civil society - capacity - ontwikkeling - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - ethiopië - nederland - armoede - sociale participatie - maatschappelijk middenveld - capaciteit
    This report presents the findings of the endline of the evaluation of the organisational capacity component of the MFS II country evaluations. The focus of this report is Ethiopia, Amref. The format is based on the requirements by the synthesis team and NWO/WOTRO. The endline was carried out in 2014. The baseline was carried out in 2012.
    Endline report – Ethiopia, CARE Ethiopia MFS II country evaluations
    Ingen, T. van; Kusters, C.S.L. ; Zerfu, E. ; Kefyalew, D. ; Peters, B. ; Buizer, N.N. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-057) - 78
    civil society - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - ethiopia - netherlands - poverty - social participation - capacity - maatschappelijk middenveld - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - ethiopië - nederland - armoede - sociale participatie - capaciteit
    This report presents the findings of the endline of the evaluation of the organisational capacity component of the MFS II country evaluations. The focus of this report is Ethiopia, CARE Ethiopia. The format is based on the requirements by the synthesis team and NWO/WOTRO. The endline was carried out in 2014. The baseline was carried out in 2012.
    Endline report – Ethiopia, ECFA MFS II country evaluations
    Ingen, T. van; Kusters, C.S.L. ; Zerfu, E. ; Kefyalew, D. ; Getu, D. ; Buizer, N.N. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-054) - 110
    civil society - community development - development cooperation - evaluation - ethiopia - netherlands - poverty - social participation - capacity - maatschappelijk middenveld - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - ethiopië - nederland - armoede - sociale participatie - capaciteit
    This report presents the findings of the endline of the evaluation of the organisational capacity component of the MFS II country evaluations. The focus of this report is Ethiopia, ECFA. The format is based on the requirements by the synthesis team and NWO/WOTRO. The endline was carried out in 2014. The baseline was carried out in 2012.
    REDS end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Desalos, C.B. ; Hofstede, M. ; Prasad Mohapatra, B. ; Madaan, A. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-076) - 78
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - india - south asia - asia - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - zuid-azië - azië
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of Rural Education for Development Society (REDS) in India that is a partner of ICCO. It assesses REDS’ contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in India for which it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which REDS contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain REDS’ role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Network of Northeast Tribes (NNET) end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Desalos, C.B. ; Wadhwa, S. ; Madaan, A. ; Kalra, A. ; Prasad Mohapatra, B. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-063) - 81
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - india - south asia - asia - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - zuid-azië - azië
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Network of Northeast Tribes (NNET) in India that is a partner of Mensen met een Missie. It assesses NNET’s efforts in strengthening Civil Society in India based upon the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2013. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which CSA contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain CSA’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Gram Vikas end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Hofstede, M. ; Wadhwa, S. ; Madaan, A. ; Pandey, R. ; Prasad Mohapatra, B. ; Kalra, A. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-025) - 76
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - india - south asia - asia - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - zuid-azië - azië
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of Gram Vikas (GV) in India that is a partner of ICCO. It assesses Gram Vikas’ efforts to strengthen Civil Society in India based upon the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which Gram Vikas contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain Gram Vikas’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Centre for Workers’ Management end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Wadhwa, S. ; Pandey, R. ; Madaan, A. ; Prasad Mohapatra, B. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-034) - 78
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - india - south asia - asia - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - zuid-azië - azië
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Centre for Workers’ Management (CWM) in India, which is a partner of Hivos. It assesses CWM’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in India whilst using the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which CWM contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain CWM’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Prithvi Theatre end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Desalos, C.B. ; Hofstede, M. ; Wadhwa, S. ; Kalra, A. ; Prasad Mohapatra, B. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-027) - 21
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - theatre - india - south asia - asia - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - theater - zuid-azië - azië
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment Prithvi Theatre in India, former partner of Hivos. It assesses Prithvi Theatre’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in India and it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012, when in fact its partnership with Hivos was already ended. This report presents very briefly the situation as it is in 2014. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Ninasam end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Hofstede, M. ; Wadhwa, S. ; Madaan, A. ; Pandey, R. ; Prasad Mohapatra, B. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-040) - 72
    poverty - civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - india - south asia - asia - armoede - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - zuid-azië - azië
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Indian theatre and arts organisation Ninasam that is a partner of Hivos. It assesses Ninasam’s contribution to Civil Society in India and it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which Ninasam contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain Ninasam’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Gene Campaign end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Desalos, C.B. ; Hofstede, M. ; Wadhwa, S. ; Pandey, R. ; Madaan, A. ; Prasad Mohapatra, B. ; Kalra, A. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-023) - 72
    civil society - empowerment - society - development projects - india - south asia - asia - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - zuid-azië - azië
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of Gene Campaign in India that is a partner of Hivos. It assesses Gene Campaign (GC) efforts in strengthening Civil Society in India based upon the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which Gene Campaign contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain Gene Campaign’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Centre for Sustainable Agriculture end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Desalos, C.B. ; Hofstede, M. ; Wadhwa, S. ; Pandey, R. ; Madaan, A. ; Prasad Mohapatra, B. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-021) - 86
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - india - south asia - asia - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - zuid-azië - azië
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Centre for Sustainable Agriculture (CSA) in India that is a partner of Hivos. It assesses CSA’s efforts in strengthening Civil Society in India based upon the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which CSA contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain CSA’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    CENDERET end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Desalos, C.B. ; Hofstede, M. ; Wadhwa, S. ; Prasad Mohapatra, B. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-029) - 22
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - india - south asia - asia - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - zuid-azië - azië
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Indian organisation CENDERET in India that is a partner of Cordaid. It assesses CENDERET’s efforts towards strengthening Civil Society in India and it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which CENDERET contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain CENDERET’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    CECOEDECON end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Desalos, C.B. ; Hofstede, M. ; Wadhwa, S. ; Pandey, R. ; Madaan, A. ; Prasad Mohapatra, B. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-026) - 77
    civil society - society - empowerment - development projects - india - south asia - asia - maatschappelijk middenveld - samenleving - ontwikkelingsprojecten - zuid-azië - azië
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Centre for Community Economics and Development Consultants Society (CECOEDECON) in India, partner of ICCO. It assesses CECOEDECON’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in India and it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which CECOEDECON contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain CECOEDECON’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Endline report – Ethiopia, TTCA MFS II country evaluations
    Ingen, T. van; Kusters, C.S.L. ; Zerfu, E. ; Kefyalew, D. ; Getu, D. ; Peters, B. ; Buizer, N.N. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-053) - 74
    civil society - community development - development cooperation - evaluation - ethiopia - netherlands - poverty - social participation - capacity - maatschappelijk middenveld - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - ethiopië - nederland - armoede - sociale participatie - capaciteit
    This report presents the findings of the endline of the evaluation of the organisational capacity component of the MFS II country evaluations. The focus of this report is Ethiopia, TTCA. The format is based on the requirements by the synthesis team and NWO/WOTRO. The endline was carried out in 2014. The baseline was carried out in 2012.
    Endline report – Ethiopia, NVEA MFS II country evaluations
    Ingen, T. van; Kusters, C.S.L. ; Zerfu, E. ; Kefyalew, D. ; Getu, D. ; Peters, B. ; Buizer, N.N. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-052) - 76
    civil society - community development - development cooperation - evaluation - ethiopia - netherlands - poverty - social participation - capacity - maatschappelijk middenveld - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - ethiopië - nederland - armoede - sociale participatie - capaciteit
    This report presents the findings of the endline of the evaluation of the organisational capacity component of the MFS II country evaluations. The focus of this report is Ethiopia, NVEA. The format is based on the requirements by the synthesis team and NWO/WOTRO. The endline was carried out in 2014. The baseline was carried out in 2012.
    Endline report – Ethiopia, HUNDEE MFS II country evaluations
    Ingen, T. van; Kusters, C.S.L. ; Zerfu, E. ; Kefyalew, D. ; Peters, B. ; Buizer, N.N. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-059) - 116
    civil society - community development - development cooperation - evaluation - ethiopia - netherlands - poverty - social participation - capacity - maatschappelijk middenveld - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - ethiopië - nederland - armoede - sociale participatie - capaciteit
    This report presents the findings of the endline of the evaluation of the organisational capacity component of the MFS II country evaluations. The focus of this report is Ethiopia, HUNDEE. The format is based on the requirements by the synthesis team and NWO/WOTRO. The endline was carried out in 2014. The baseline was carried out in 2012.
    Endline report – Ethiopia, HOA-REC MFS II country evaluations
    Ingen, T. van; Kusters, C.S.L. ; Zerfu, E. ; Kefyalew, D. ; Peters, B. ; Buizer, N.N. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / Wageningen UR, Centre for Development Innovation CDI-15-058) - 84
    civil society - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - ethiopia - netherlands - poverty - social participation - capacity - maatschappelijk middenveld - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - ethiopië - nederland - armoede - sociale participatie - capaciteit
    This report presents the findings of the endline of the evaluation of the organisational capacity component of the MFS II country evaluations. The focus of this report is Ethiopia, HOA-REC. The format is based on the requirements by the synthesis team and NWO/WOTRO. The endline was carried out in 2014. The baseline was carried out in 2012.
    Endline report – Ethiopia, FSCE MFS II country evaluations
    Ingen, T. van; Kusters, C.S.L. ; Zerfu, E. ; Kefyalew, D. ; Buizer, N.N. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (CDI rapporten CDI-15-055) - 104
    development - community development - civil society - development cooperation - evaluation - ethiopia - netherlands - poverty - social participation - capacity - ontwikkeling - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - maatschappelijk middenveld - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - ethiopië - nederland - armoede - sociale participatie - capaciteit
    This report presents the findings of the endline of the evaluation of the organisational capacity component of the MFS II country evaluations. The focus of this report is Ethiopia, FSCE. The format is based on the requirements by the synthesis team and NWO/WOTRO. The endline was carried out in 2014. The baseline was carried out in 2012.
    Yayasan RUANGRUPA end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Nugroho, K. ; Smidt, H. ; Prasetyo, K. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / CDI 15-038)
    maatschappelijk middenveld - verandering - governance - sociale participatie - beeldende kunsten - armoede - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - nederland - indonesië - civil society - change - social participation - visual arts - poverty - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - netherlands - indonesia
    This report describes the results of the end line assessment of Yayasan RUANGRUPA that is a partner of Hivos. It assesses RUANGRUPA’s contributions towards strengthening Civil Society in Indonesia using the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which RUANGRUPA contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain RUANGRUPA’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    KKI-WARSI end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Nugroho, K. ; Smidt, H. ; Sinung Prasetya, K. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / CDI 15-062) - 86
    maatschappelijk middenveld - verandering - sociale participatie - natuurbescherming - armoede - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - nederland - indonesië - civil society - change - social participation - nature conservation - poverty - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - netherlands - indonesia
    This report describes the results of the end line assessment of the Indonesian Organisation KKI-WARSI that is a partner of IUCN-NL. It assesses KKI-WARSI’s efforts towards strengthening Civil Society in Indonesia and used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which KKI-WARSI contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain the organisation’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    NTFP-EP end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Nugroho, K. ; Smidt, H. ; Larastiti, C. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / CDI 15-068) - 92
    maatschappelijk middenveld - sociale participatie - armoede - bosbestanden - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - nederland - indonesië - civil society - social participation - poverty - forest resources - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - netherlands - indonesia
    This report describes the results of the end line assessment of Non Timber Forest Product-Exchange Programme (NTFP-EP) that is a partner of IUCN and a part of the Ecosystem Alliance. It assesses NTFP-EP’s contributions towards strengthening Civil Society in Indonesia using the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which NTFP-EP contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain NTFP-EP’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    LPPSLH end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Nugroho, K. ; Smidt, H. ; Sinung Prasetyo, K. ; Sutantio, S. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / CDI 15-060) - 86
    maatschappelijk middenveld - verandering - natuurlijke hulpbronnen - milieu - sociale participatie - armoede - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - nederland - indonesië - civil society - change - natural resources - environment - social participation - poverty - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - netherlands - indonesia
    This report describes the results of the end line assessment of the Indonesian Foundation for Research and Development of Natural Resources and Environment –LPPSLH that is a partner of Hivos. It assesses LPPSLH’s efforts towards strengthening Civil Society in Indonesia, using the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which LPPSLH contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain LPPSLH’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    KWLM end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Prasetyo, K. ; Smidt, H. ; Sutikno, - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / CDI 15-066) - 74
    maatschappelijk middenveld - verandering - sociale participatie - armoede - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - nederland - indonesië - civil society - change - social participation - poverty - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - netherlands - indonesia
    This report describes the results of the end line assessment of KWLM that is a partner of Hivos. It assesses KWLM’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Indonesia and it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which KWLM contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain KWLM’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Kantor Berita Radio (KBR) end line reportKantor Berita Radio (KBR) end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Smidt, H. ; Nugroho, K. ; Amir, S. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / CDI 15-024) - 74
    maatschappelijk middenveld - sociale participatie - radio - armoede - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - nederland - indonesië - civil society - social participation - poverty - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - netherlands - indonesia
    This report describes the results of the end line assessment of the Kantor Berita Radio 68H (KBR68H), a partner of Free Press Unlimited in Indonesia. It assesses how KBR68H has contributed towards strengthening civil society in Indonesia using the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered relate to changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which KBR68H contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made, and an identification of factors that explain KBR68H’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    FIELD end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Prasetyo, K. ; Smidt, H. ; Sutikno, - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / CDI 15-067) - 80
    maatschappelijk middenveld - sociale participatie - armoede - boeren - plattelandscoöperaties - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - nederland - indonesië - civil society - social participation - poverty - farmers - rural cooperatives - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - netherlands - indonesia
    This report describes the results of the end line assessment of FIELD that is a partner of Hivos. It assesses FIELD’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Indonesia and it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which FIELD contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain FIELD’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    ELSAM end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Nugroho, K. ; Smidt, H. ; Amir, S. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / CDI 15-039) - 83
    maatschappelijk middenveld - sociale participatie - armoede - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - governance - evaluatie - nederland - indonesië - civil society - social participation - poverty - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - netherlands - indonesia
    This report describes the results of the end line assessment of ELSAM that is a partner of Hivos. It assesses ELSAM’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Indonesia and it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which ELSAM contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain ELSAM’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Combine Resource Institute end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Nugroho, K. ; Smidt, H. ; Sinung Prasetyo, K. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / CDI 15-064) - 88
    maatschappelijk middenveld - sociale participatie - armoede - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - ontwikkeling - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - evaluatie - nederland - indonesië - civil society - social participation - poverty - community development - development - development cooperation - evaluation - netherlands - indonesia
    This report describes the results of the end line assessment of Combine Resource Institute (CRI) in Indonesia that that is a partner of Hivos. It assesses CRI’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Indonesia and for this exercise it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which CRI contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain CRI’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    Common Room end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component
    Klaver, D.C. ; Nugroho, K. ; Smidt, H. ; Prasetyo, K. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen UR (Report / CDI 15-061) - 77
    maatschappelijk middenveld - sociale participatie - armoede - gemeenschapsontwikkeling - evaluatie - ontwikkelingssamenwerking - ontwikkeling - indonesië - nederland - civil society - social participation - poverty - community development - evaluation - development cooperation - development - indonesia - netherlands
    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the Indonesian organisation Common Room that is a partner of Hivos. It assesses Common Room’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Indonesia and for this exercise it used the CIVICUS analytical framework. It is a follow-up of a baseline study conducted in 2012. Key questions that are being answered comprise changes in the five CIVICUS dimensions to which Common Room contributed; the nature of its contribution; the relevance of the contribution made and an identification of factors that explain Common Room’s role in civil society strengthening. The evaluation was commissioned by NWO-WOTRO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research in the Netherlands and is part of the programmatic evaluation of the Co-Financing System - MFS II financed by the Dutch Government, whose overall aim is to strengthen civil society in the South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. Apart from assessing impact on MDGs, the evaluation also assesses the contribution of the Dutch Co-Funding Agencies to strengthen the capacities of their Southern Partners, as well as the contribution of these partners towards building a vibrant civil society arena.
    The Women’s Movement in South Kivu, DRC: A civil society analysis
    Hilhorst, D. ; Bashwira Nyenyezi, M.R. - \ 2014
    Wageningen : IS Academy on Human Security in Fragile States (Occasional paper / Special Chair Humanitarian Aid and Reconstruction 11) - 62
    congo democratic republic - congo - women - civil society - woman and society - woman's status - women's movement - civil law - qualitative analysis - humanitarian aid - development aid - democratische republiek kongo - vrouwen - maatschappelijk middenveld - vrouw en samenleving - positie van de vrouw - vrouwenbeweging - burgerlijk recht - kwalitatieve analyse - humanitaire hulp - ontwikkelingshulp
    Stories becoming sticky : how civic initiatives strive for connection to governmental spatial planning agendas
    Stoep, H. van der - \ 2014
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Adri van den Brink; Noelle Aarts. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789461738295 - 282
    ruimtelijke ordening - publieke participatie - maatschappelijk middenveld - bestuurskunde - besluitvorming - maatschappelijke betrokkenheid - regionale planning - communicatie - verhoudingen tussen bevolking en staat - burgers - participatie - zuid-holland - krimpenerwaard - zuid-limburg - physical planning - public participation - civil society - public administration - decision making - community involvement - regional planning - communication - relations between people and state - citizens - participation - zuid-holland - krimpenerwaard - zuid-limburg

    This thesis aims to understand the phenomenon of self-organizing civic initiatives, how they engage in and connect to planning practices aimed at the improvement of the quality of places and why these connections lead to alteration or transformation of governmental planning agendas or not. By providing greater understanding about these processes the thesis aims to contribute to debates about how planners can improve connections with civil society initiatives and how a more responsive and adaptive attitude towards a dynamically changing society can be achieved.

    Conclusions were drawn from two in-depth case-studies of civic initiatives in two Dutch regions: 1) initiatives of business entrepreneurs and experts to develop New Markets which support the cultural landscape of the region Heuvelland, and 2) initiatives of citizens for the protection and development of landscape values in the urban-rural fringe Gouda-Krimpenerwaard. Building on agenda-setting and framing theory the analysis focused on how initiatives self-organized and connected to other stakeholders and how outcomes of their efforts in terms of their ambitions and government agendas could be understood.

    The research results point to the crucial role of storytelling and the day-to-day interactions in which stories emerge and become ‘sticky’. Sticky stories are strong ‘attractors’ that mobilize attention and support. The stickiness of a story was enhanced through discursive processes in which the story was connected to the self-referential frames of targeted supporters. Thus, sticky stories could not emerge without empathic listening, timing and patience. Three interplaying conditions were critical in the process of a story becoming sticky or fading away: 1) formal and informal ‘catalytic’ conversations as the medium of storytelling; 2) storytelling by people who perform as connectors and enable the travelling of stories through a wider network, and 3) signalling and incorporating focusing events into evolving stories in ways considered meaningful and relevant by targeted supporters. This results in a model that offers a way to understand dynamical change of policy and planning agendas by focusing on the interactive construction, connection, and subtle alteration of stories in day-to-day conversations, by the right people, at the right moments.

    Justicia Hídrica: acumulación, conflicto y acción social
    Boelens, R.A. ; Cremers, L. ; Zwarteveen, M.Z. - \ 2011
    Impreso en Perú : Justicia Hídrica, IEP Instituto de Estudios Peruanos, Fondo Editorial PUCP (Serie Agua y sociedad : Sección justicia hidrica ) - ISBN 9789972513121 - 476
    watervoorraden - toegangsrecht - water - conflict - sociologie - waterbeheer - overheidsbeleid - liberalisatie - justitie - maatschappelijk middenveld - latijns-amerika - water resources - right of access - water - conflict - sociology - water management - government policy - liberalization - justice - civil society - latin america
    Civil society in urban sanitation and solid waste management: The role of NGOs and CBOs in metropolises of East Africa
    Tukahirwa, J. - \ 2011
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Arthur Mol, co-promotor(en): Peter Oosterveer. - [S.l.] : S.n. - ISBN 9789461730121 - 166
    maatschappelijk middenveld - volksgezondheidsbevordering - afvalbeheer - niet-gouvernementele organisaties - maatschappelijke betrokkenheid - stedelijke samenleving - bevolkingsgroepen met een laag inkomen - milieubeleid - steden - oost-afrika - uganda - civil society - sanitation - waste management - non-governmental organizations - community involvement - urban society - low income groups - environmental policy - towns - east africa - uganda

    Urban sanitation and solid waste management are among the most significant factors that affect the poor in developing countries and contribute to their sustained poverty. It is the poorest people, particularly children, who suffer most from weak or non-existent services, through illness, distress and many early and preventable deaths. This intolerable state of affairs is caused by a combination of political, socio-economic, cultural, and technological aspects. In recent years, sanitation and solid waste management have received increasing attention as shown in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which aim at halving the proportion of the population without access to sustainable basic sanitation by 2015 and at achieving significant improvements in the lives of slum-dwellers by 2020 (MDG Goal 7). Today, with less than five and ten years to fulfill these targets,when compared to other developing continents, Africa is lagging behind and there is need for effective action to address this challenge.

    This research is placed within this debate and tries to contribute to achieving the aim of universal access to sanitation and solid waste management services. The focus is on the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based organizations (CBOs) in urban slums of East Africa because these organizations are considered key players in the provision of sanitary and solid waste disposal services in such areas and yet their work has not been critically assessed. Two main questions were addressed; (i) In what ways are NGOs/CBOs participating in the development and implementation of sanitation and solid waste management and what are the key factors influencing their participation? (ii) How and to what extent are the sanitation and solid waste management activities of NGOs/CBOs sustainable; accessible to the poor; and flexible and resilient under changing socio-political, institutional and economic conditions? The conceptual framework developed for answering these research questions was based on the Modernized Mixtures Approach and several other theories (such as partnership paradigm, social network theory and institutional pluralism) that serve to explain key factors influencing the role of NGOs/CBOs in such activities.

    The research confirmed that NGOs/CBOs are fully involved in the provision of the two services and the idea of environmental partnership is widely shared and supported. Empirical evidence gathered showed a modernized mixture model emerging, where the conventional advocates of large-scale, privatized, and high-technological sanitation and solid waste services partner with NGOs/CBOs. This research also found that access to sanitation and solid waste services is driven by both NGOs/CBOs and the urban poor in collaboration. Social proximity is important, next to the conventional factors of spatial proximity, socio-economic characteristics and perception of the perceived competence of NGOs/CBOs. User acceptance of innovative technologies was found to be a key factor when trying to improve sanitary facilities for the urban poor.

    Keywords: Sanitation, Solid Waste Management, East Africa, NGOs, CBOs, Modernized Mixtures Approach

    Van wie is het bos eigenlijk? Essays over participatie en natuurbeheer
    Keulartz, F.W.J. ; Veen, M. v.d. - \ 2009
    Driebergen : Staatsbosbeheer - 92
    bossen - participatie - samenleving - filosofie - individuen - gemeenschappen - regering - politiek - natuurbeheer - maatschappelijk middenveld - natuur - forests - participation - society - philosophy - individuals - communities - government - politics - nature management - civil society - nature
    Democratie en de grote economie
    Dijk, G. van; Klep, L. - \ 2008
    Utrecht : s.n. - 64
    coöperaties - democratie - sociale participatie - nederland - coöperatieve verenigingen - landbouwcoöperaties - maatschappelijk middenveld - deugdelijk ondernemingsbestuur - cooperatives - democracy - social participation - netherlands - cooperative societies - agricultural cooperatives - civil society - corporate governance
    De publicatie “Democratie en de grote economie” van prof.dr.ir. G. van Dijk en ir. L.F.M. Klep is op 20 juni 2008 uitgebracht ter gelegenheid van het afscheid van Gert van Dijk als directeur van de NCR. Op dit moment behoren de coöperatieve ondernemingen in ons land tot de laatste grote bedrijven die nog geheel in Nederlandse handen zijn. De zeggenschap berust namelijk bij de leden, die daarmee een doel voor ogen hebben. Ledenzeggenschap gaat daarom niet alleen over toezicht op goed bestuur, maar ook over dat ledendoel. Dit stelt bijzondere eisen aan het democratisch functioneren van ledenzeggenschap. In dit essay gaan de auteurs in op de voorwaarden waaronder die interne democratie ook in de toekomst goed kan blijven functioneren.
    Partners in peace : discourses and practices of civil-society peacebuilding
    Leeuwen, M. van - \ 2008
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Thea Hilhorst. - S.l. : S.n. - ISBN 9789085049562 - 252
    oorlog - conflict - sociale onrust - preventie - internationale samenwerking - ontwikkelingsbeleid - hedendaagse samenleving - sudan - rwanda - burundi - democratische republiek kongo - guatemala - peace building - vrede - maatschappelijk middenveld - internationale conflicten - politieke conflicten - sociaal conflict - conflictmanagement - war - conflict - social unrest - prevention - international cooperation - development policy - contemporary society - sudan - rwanda - burundi - congo democratic republic - guatemala - peacebuilding - peace - civil society - international conflicts - political conflicts - social conflict - conflict management
    This study looks into images, and assumptions, of civil-society peacebuilding and its support by international development organizations, and how this relates to politics and practices of peacebuilding on the ground. It is built principally on a series of case studies of peacebuilding interventions and organizations working in southern Sudan, Burundi and the African Great Lakes Region, and Guatemala. This study underscores the importance of implicit assumptions in contemporary peacebuilding work. International support to civil-society peacebuilding is often guided by simplified notions on conflict and the potential roles of civil society in bringing about peace. To arrive at better peacebuilding practices, it is necessary to know more about what civil society is, how it works, and how the assumptions motivating its support work out in practice. This requires exploring the everyday peacebuilding practices of civil-society organizations. In particular, attention needs be given to the organizing practices of peacebuilding organizations, how they operate and develop, to the different meanings attributed to peacebuilding by the diverse parties involved, and to how understanding peacebuilding is part of organizational politics.
    In fieldwork and analysis, I applied an actor-oriented approach. Such an approach helps to clarify how policies and interventions of organizations result from the everyday practices of organizations and the people and authorities of the communities where they implement their programs. A core notion in this study is discourse, referring to collective practices of ordering or ‘framing’ in the minds of actors, who make sense of their experiences through coherent schemes. Discourses are often seen as implying power: as dominant traditions of looking at the world which eliminate alternative visions, or as affecting social relations through diverse ways. Organizations may use discourses strategically, for example, to legitimize interventions. Discourse can be highly political, promoting particular agendas for development.
    While acknowledging the power of discourse, this study focuses on discourse as a cognitive process. To be able to operate and to respond to the complexity of conflict and peacebuilding, development organizations simplify reality. But simplifying reality always implies that parts of reality are lost or remain underexposed. In the case studies, I reflect on the consequences of simplification, and explore how development organizations can better take account of the necessary simplifications they make. In practice, it is often difficult to separate the cognitive exercise of ordering from the politics of ordering - the two often interact or go closely together. Simplification always implies political choices by prioritizing certain problems and interpreting particular interventions as the most appropriate. The study argues that to understand ordering requires giving equal attention to the several attributes of discourse. This research approach is elaborated upon in chapter 1.
    Chapter 1 also reflects on my experiences with an interactive research approach. Through such an interactive approach, I aimed to develop a sense of ownership over questions and recommendations by the civil-society organizations involved in the research and so enhance their peacebuilding work. In my experience, an interactive approach enhances the depth of ethnography and analysis of findings. Carrying out research with (instead of only on) organizations facilitates relations of trust and witnessing organizing practices from within organizations, and enables discussing findings with research partners. It stands out in this study that rather than a research methodology, the interactive character of research should be seen as an intention. The extent to which research becomes interactive cannot be planned, nor assured by the adoption of particular interactive methodologies. Rather, the interactive character of research develops with the advancement of collaboration. Crucial to this process is mutual commitment, which depends on the flexibility of the research and research partners, the expected benefits for the participants, the extent to which expectations are satisfied along the way, and the enthusiasm of individual participants. The interactive character of research is also affected by organizational changes and changing interests. Practically, this means that a researcher needs to ensure that space for participation and non-participation is maintained throughout the process.
    The subsequent two chapters analyse international discourses and policies of peacebuilding, and look at a general level at how organizations make sense of conflict. Chapter 2 analyzes how over the 1990s, peacebuilding discourses developed that attributed a major role to civil society in realizing peace. Though seeming consensus on peacebuilding evaporated with the anti-terrorist policies after 9/11, and peacebuilding roles taken on by international NGOs and local civil-society organizations were reclaimed by donor governments and multi-lateral agencies, many international and local organizations continued to be involved in peacebuilding. Nonetheless, consensus on what peacebuilding should look like remains absent. Development actors differ considerably in prioritizing particular domains, and do not agree on the sequencing and interdependence of particular interventions. Moreover, practices of civil-society peacebuilding implicitly build on strong assumptions about the roles civil society, the state and international actors should play in peacebuilding and governance.
    Chapter 3 analyses how those policy trends and emerging discourses regarding peacebuilding and civil society are reflected in the work of particular international development organizations. The chapter demonstrates that peacebuilding is not just an opportunistically applied policy label but has acquired different meanings in practice. Definitions of peacebuilding in policy strategies reflect the different backgrounds of organizations. At the same time, local conditions set limits and pose specific opportunities for peacebuilding. The chapter illustrates that rather than that international development organizations change their practices when new discourses come into fashion and replace previous ones, practices of organizations follow slower. Newer and older discourses continue to be relevant in the practices of organizations. This provides room for manoeuvre to organizations who find in this multiple grounds to legitimize a large range of intervention strategies. Policies are an ongoing process, and are shaped along the way by diverse participants, a theme that is elaborated upon also in the next chapters.
    The remainder of the study discusses case studies of the everyday practices of civil-society peacebuilding in a variety of countries. Chapter 4 analyses the organizing practices of a local women’s peace organization in southern Sudan. The case underscores how the practice of policy making and implementation is more related to the internal dynamics of an organization than to the planned objectives of the intervention. The chapter highlights that to better understand civil-society peacebuilding we need qualitative approaches that give central attention to dynamics of peace organizations. These include the history of an organization and the context in which it develops, the way conflict is experienced in the every day life of local people, the way how actors in and around organizations give meaning to the organization and its practices, and the politics of organizations. The chapter outlines such an approach, presenting five properties of local peace organizations that need be taken into account when supporting local peacebuilding.
    The next two case studies look in particular at how the framing of conflict situations works through in interventions. Chapter 5 analyses how conflict and peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region are increasingly framed in regional terms. In practice, however, local and international organizations have difficulty in analysing the regional character of conflict and arriving at collaborative regional strategies. Moreover, local civil-society organizations are deeply embedded in the politics of regional conflict. Consequently, the shift to regional peacebuilding approaches remains more theoretical than practical. A regional framing of conflict helps to understand conflict, but fails to inform intervention practice.
    Chapter 6 discusses the consequences of understanding land disputes in Burundi as short term problem, resulting from the massive return of refugees and displaced to their home communities. This particular framing of land disputes urged international and local organizations to initiate programmes for strengthening the capacities of local conflict resolving institutions. The case material shows that though the return of refugees was a factor in disputes about land, there is a lot of continuity between conflict-related and regular land disputes in Burundi. Many land disputes require first and foremost solutions at the political level, rather than at the local level. Moreover, the question was whether the strengthening of local dispute resolving mechanisms would enhance their legitimacy and accessibility, and could guarantee the protection of vulnerable people. While a framing of local land disputes in terms of an emergency helped to define interventions, this framing neglected the long-term, structural character of many land disputes.
    Chapter 7 tackles the question of what the official ending of violence implies for the roles, policies and practices of civil-society organizations. It discusses how Guatemalan civil-society organizations deal with agrarian conflict, ten years after the 1996 peace agreements. The case study shows how international organizations tend to assume that the peace agreements implied a switch to a peaceful situation, in which state institutions function, and civil society can effectively participate in the democratic process. This imagining makes them to assume that civil society now has to switch from protest to proposal, and to neglect the slow process of societal transformation in a post-conflict setting. The chapter argues that the pace and extent of societal transformation has a strong influence on how organizations can develop. It also illustrates that framing conflict and intervention is a continuous process, in which organizational politics play an important role. Finally, the chapter raises some questions on the overall roles of the international community in realizing peace. It argues that the increasing global influence on national governance processes effectively diminishes the power of local citizens to demand accountability from their governments for the processes of change initiated.
    Chapter 8, the conclusion of the study, argues the importance of looking at the everyday practices of peacebuilding. It points out how international discourses on civil-society peacebuilding have resonated in the policies of international development organizations. Over the last fifteen years many organizations have come to reflect on how their programmes contribute to peaceful societies. What emerged was not a circumscribed and shared peacebuilding agenda, but a shared preoccupation with the impacts of diverse interventions on peace and conflict. The precise reasons why organizations apply the term, what peacebuilding does and how it works cannot be read from mandates and policy documents. It requires one to look at the everyday politics and practices of organizations. The meaning of peacebuilding results from everyday negotiations of staff-members and stakeholders at different levels in the aid-chain, each with their own interests and perspectives. To understand peacebuilding, one needs to understand the history of organizations and individual staff members, and the multiple identities and realities organizations represent to the people participating in them, and explore the roles of both organizational politics and conflict politics in defining interventions.
    The conclusion also poses pertinent questions on the assumptions underlying contemporary peacebuilding work, in particular on the roles of civil society and governance. The particular roles civil-society organizations may play in peacebuilding and their most effective contributions to governance strongly depend on local conditions, and on how those influence organizations. International development organizations tend to have particular images of what civil society should do and look like and are eager to support only those organizations fitting their image. International support to local civil society needs to take more account of prevailing forms of governance and the history and development of civil society in a particular context.
    Finally, the conclusion lines out different processes through which organizations arrive at particular framings of the reality in which they operate. Such framings simplify reality in ways that create possibilities for intervention or restrict them. Framing involves cognitive processes of ordering and creating routine, as much as organizational politics. Organizations tend to separate emergency from normality, to focus on techniques of intervention, and to interpret contexts and peacebuilding interventions according to their own frames of reference and particular expertise. At the same time, organizational politics –intentionally or unintentionally– play a strong role in ordering. Organizations promote particular representations of reality that are in line with their possibilities for intervention, and that legitimize them to intervene, and that present their interventions in a-political terms.
    The chapter underscores the high expectations international organizations often have of their intervention. The study points to the need to observe modesty and connect to local agendas. Rather than to work on grand schemes of peacebuilding and taking the lead in societal transformation, they need to be partners in peace.


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