Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Genetics and selective breeding of variation in wing truncation in a flightless aphid control agent
    Lommen, Suzanne T.E. ; Koops, Kees G. ; Cornelder, Bardo A. ; Jong, Peter W. de; Brakefield, Paul M. - \ 2019
    Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 167 (2019)7. - ISSN 0013-8703 - p. 636 - 645.
    Adalia bipunctata - artificial selection - augmentative pest control - biological control - Coccinellidae - Coleoptera - cryptic genetic variation - gene-by-environment interaction - ladybird - modifier genes - predator - winglessness

    Augmentative biological control by predaceous ladybird beetles can be improved by using flightless morphs, which have longer residence times on the host plants. The two-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is used for the biological control of aphids in greenhouses and on urban trees. Flightlessness due to truncated wings occurs at very low frequency in some natural populations of A. bipunctata. Pure-breeding strains of this 'wingless' genotype of A. bipunctata can easily be obtained in the laboratory. Such strains have not been commercialized yet due to concerns about their reduced fitness compared to wild-type strains, which renders mass production more expensive. Wingless strains exhibit, however, wide intra-population phenotypic variation in the extent of wing truncation which is related to fitness traits. We here use classical quantitative genetic techniques to study the heritability and genetic architecture of variation in wing truncation in a wingless strain of A. bipunctata. Split-families reared at one of two temperatures revealed strong family-by-temperature interaction: heritability was estimated as 0.64 ± 0.09 at 19 °C and 0.29 ± 0.06 at 29 °C. Artificial selection in opposite directions at 21 °C demonstrated that the degree of wing truncation can be altered within a few generations resulting in wingless phenotypes without any wing tissue (realized h2 = 0.72), as well as those with minimal truncations (realized h2 = 0.61) in two replicates. The latter lines produced more than twice as many individuals. This indicates that selective breeding of wing truncation may be exploited to improve mass rearing of flightless strains of A. bipunctata for commercial biological control. Our work illustrates that cryptic variation can also be a source for the selective breeding of natural enemies.

    Life histories of an invasive and native ladybird under field experimental conditions in a temperate climate
    Raak-van den Berg, C.L. ; Jong, Peter W. de; Gort, Gerrit ; Manly, Bryan F.J. ; Lenteren, Joop C. van - \ 2018
    Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 166 (2018)3. - ISSN 0013-8703 - p. 151 - 161.
    Harmonia axyridis - Adalia bipunctata - Coccinellidae - Coleoptera - Competition between species - Field experimental study - Immature development - Immature survival - Intraguild predation - Life table - Northwestern Europe - Tilia × europaea
    Among characteristics that are thought to determine the success of invasive species, life-history traits feature prominently. However, in most cases, these have been determined under laboratory conditions. Here, we use a field set-up to determine immature development time and survival of invasive Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) and native Adalia bipunctata L. (both Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). On caged Tilia × europaea L. cv. Pallida trees (Malvaceae) with ample amounts of aphid food, we introduced freshly hatched larvae of a single or of both ladybird species and followed their development until emergence of adults. Under the condition of ample prey availability, both ladybird species apparently hardly interacted and intraguild predation did not cause significant mortality. Development time of both species is in line with data from laboratory tests under controlled conditions. Immature survival can reach high levels, but is considerably higher for H. axyridis (44-100%) than for A. bipunctata (11-77%), resulting in faster increase of H. axyridis populations, which is one of the factors that may explain its invasion success.
    differences in thermal balance, body temperature and activity between non-melanic and melanic two-spot ladybird beetles (Adalia bipunctata) under controlled conditions
    Jong, Peter W. De; Gussekloo, Sander W.S. ; Brakefield, Paul M. - \ 1996
    Journal of Experimental Biology 199 (1996)12. - ISSN 0022-0949 - p. 2655 - 2666.
    Adalia bipunctata - Colour morph - Ladybird - Melanism - Physical model - Thermal balance - Walking speed

    The consequences of the elytral colour difference between non-melanic (red) and melanic (black) two-spot ladybirds for their thermal properties were studied by applying and testing a biophysical model. The expected differential effects of variation in transmission through the elytra, body size, width of the subelytral cavity, ambient temperature, radiation intensity and wind speed are described, assuming that the two colour patterns represent differences in elytral reflectance and transmittance. The model predicts a higher body temperature for melanic beetles under most conditions. Invasive temperature measurements on living beetles under ranges of specified conditions with respect to ambient temperature, radiative regime and wind speed were in qualitative agreement with the model predictions and, considering the assumptions made, closely corresponded at the quantitative level. The consequences of the temperature differences for morph activity were studied by measuring walking speeds and the time needed to become active for each morph under the various conditions. The results are consistent with the differences in body temperature, assuming an optimum curve relating performance to body temperature. The colour difference between morphs appeared to be the principal factor influencing activity.

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