Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==Antagonists
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Stepwise screening of candidate antagonists for biological control of Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici
Köhl, Jürgen ; Goossen van de Geijn, Helen ; Groenenboom de Haas, Lia ; Henken, Betty ; Hauschild, Rüdiger ; Hilscher, Ulrike ; Lombaers-van der Plas, Carin ; Bosch, Trudy van den; Wikström, Mariann - \ 2019
Biological Control 136 (2019). - ISSN 1049-9644
Antagonists - Biological control - Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici - Powdery mildew - Risk assessment - Screening criteria - Tilletiospsis pallescens - Wheat

Antagonists for the biological control of Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici were selected using a stepwise screening approach. Fungal colonizers of powdery mildew pustules were isolated from leaves of cereals and other plant species. Spore production, cold tolerance, drought tolerance and UV-B resistance as important characteristics for application of biocontrol candidates in the phyllosphere were tested in in vitro assays and preliminary risk assessments were conducted. Amongst 850 tested isolates 58% belonged to various taxonomical groups of Cladosporium. Only 3% belonged to species that have been reported in literature as antagonistic to powdery mildews. The stepwise screening approach allowed to reduce the number of candidate antagonists using screening criteria that can be tested reliably and cost-effectively in in vitro assays and by data mining from initially 1237 isolates down to 143 candidate antagonists belonging to 42 taxonomical groups. The potential of these isolates to reduce conidia production of B. graminis f. sp. tritici. in wheat was assessed in bioassays on potted winter wheat plants under controlled conditions. A set of ten superior isolates was subsequently tested in a series of trials on potted spring wheat plants under open field conditions. Isolates Tilletiopsis pallescens BC0441 and T. pallescens BC0850 significantly reduced the number of powdery mildew pustules per flag leaf by 30 to 62%. Slopes of the regression lines fitted to data on number of powdery mildew pustules during time were significantly reduced by the antagonists indicating that the powdery mildew epidemics were slowed down. Treatments with T. pallescens BC0441 and T. pallescens BC0850 also reduced leaf coverage with powdery mildew pustules in a small-scale field trial in spring wheat.

Potential for synergy in soil inoculation for nature restoration by mixing inocula from different successional stages
Wubs, E.R.J. ; Melchers, Pauline D. ; Bezemer, T.M. - \ 2018
Plant and Soil 433 (2018)1-2. - ISSN 0032-079X - p. 147 - 156.
Antagonists - Community coalescence - Mutualists - Plant-soil interactions - Soil inoculation

Background and aims: Soil inoculation is a powerful tool for the restoration of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the origin of the donor material may differentially influence early- and late-successional plant species. Donor soil from late-succession stages may benefit target plant species due to a higher abundance of soil-borne mutualists. Arable soils, on the other hand, may suppress ruderals as they support more root herbivores that preferentially attack ruderal plant species, while mid-succession soils may be intermediate in their effects on ruderals and target species performance. We hypothesized that a mixture of arable and late-succession inocula may outperform pure late-successional inocula for restoration, by promoting late-successional target plants, while simultaneously reducing ruderal species’ performance. Methods: We conducted a glasshouse experiment and tested the growth of ruderal and target plant species on pure and mixed inocula. The inocula were derived from arable fields, mid-succession grasslands and late-succession heathlands and we created a replacement series testing different pairwise mixitures for each of these inocula types (ratios: 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, 0:100 of inoculum A and B respectively). Results: In general, we found that a higher proportion of heathland material led to a higher aboveground biomass of target plant species, while responses of ruderal species were variable. We found synergistic effects when specific inocula were mixed. In particular, a 50:50 mixture of heathland and arable soil in the inoculum led to a significant reduction in ruderal species biomass relative to the two respective pure inocula. The overall response was driven by Myosotis arvensis, since the other two ruderal species were not significantly affected. Conclusions: Mixing inocula from different successional stages can lead to synergistic effects on restoration, but this highly depends on the specific combination of inocula, the mixing ratio and plant species. This suggest that specific inocula may need to be developed in order to rapidly restore different plant communities.

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