Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Current refinement(s):

    Records 1 - 2 / 2

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export

      Export search results

    • alert
      We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==Cities
    Check title to add to marked list
    Transportation where people leave: An introduction
    Franklin, Rachel S. ; Leeuwen, Eveline S. van; Paez, Antonio - \ 2018
    In: Advances in Transport Policy and Planning / Franklin, Rachel S., Van Leeuwen, Eveline S., Paez, Antonio, Elsevier B.V. (Advances in Transport Policy and Planning ) - ISBN 9780128154540 - p. 1 - 14.
    Cities - Demographic aging - Exurbia - Population loss - Rural - Suburbia - Transportation

    Transportation means access: to jobs, information, communities, and services. When depopulation occurs a number of questions arise around the central query: what was and will be the role of transportation? This volume engages with several aspects of the depopulation-transportation topic and at multiple geographic scales—from the national and regional to the city- and neighborhood-level. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the challenges associated with population loss and how various aspects of transportation research intersect with these issues. We then summarize the chapters included in this volume, showing how they connect to larger emerging research themes, as well as to each other.

    Climate change adaptation planning in large cities : A systematic global assessment
    Araos, Malcolm ; Berrang-Ford, Lea ; Ford, James D. ; Austin, Stephanie E. ; Biesbroek, Robbert ; Lesnikowski, Alexandra - \ 2016
    Environmental Science & Policy 66 (2016). - ISSN 1462-9011 - p. 375 - 382.
    Adaptation - Cities - Climate change - Monitoring and evaluation - Systematic assessment

    Cities globally face significant risks from climate change, and are taking an increasingly active role in formulating and implementing climate change adaptation policy. However, there are few, if any, global assessments of adaptation taking place across cities. This study develops and applies a framework to track urban climate change adaptation policy using municipal adaptation reporting. From 401 local governments globally in urban areas with >1. m people, we find that only 61 cities (15%) report any adaptation initiatives, and 73 cities (18%) report on planning towards adaptation policy. We classified cities based on their adaptation reporting as extensive adaptors, moderate adaptors, early stage adaptors, and non-reporting. With few exceptions, extensive adaptors are large cities located in high-income countries in North America, Europe, and Oceania, and are adapting to a variety of expected impacts. Moderate adaptors usually address general disaster risk reduction rather than specific impacts, and are located in a mix of developed and developing countries. Early stage adaptors exhibit evidence of planning for adaptation, but do not report any initiatives. Our findings suggest that urban adaptation is in the early stages, but there are still substantive examples of governments taking leadership regardless of wealth levels and institutional barriers.

    Check title to add to marked list

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.