Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    In four shallow and mesophotic tropical reef sponges from Guam the microbial community largely depends on host identity
    Steinert, Georg ; Taylor, Michael W. ; Deines, Peter ; Simister, Rachel L. ; Voogd, Nicole J. De; Hoggard, Michael ; Schupp, Peter J. - \ 2016
    PeerJ 2016 (2016)4. - ISSN 2167-8359
    16S rRNA - Environmental variability - Microbial diversity - Porifera - Pyrosequencing - Symbiosis

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are important members of almost all aquatic ecosystems, and are renowned for hosting often dense and diverse microbial communities. While the specificity of the sponge microbiota seems to be closely related to host phylogeny, the environmental factors that could shape differences within local sponge-specific communities remain less understood. On tropical coral reefs, sponge habitats can span from shallow areas to deeper, mesophotic sites. These habitats differ in terms of environmental factors such as light, temperature, and food availability, as well as anthropogenic impact. In order to study the host specificity and potential influence of varying habitats on the sponge microbiota within a local area, four tropical reef sponges, Rhabdastrella globostellata, Callyspongia sp., Rhaphoxya sp., and Acanthella cavernosa, were collected from exposed shallow reef slopes and a deep reef drop-off. Based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing profiles, beta diversity analyses revealed that each sponge species possessed a specific microbiota that was significantly different to those of the other species and exhibited attributes that are characteristic of high- and/or lowmicrobial- abundance sponges. These findings emphasize the influence of host identity on the associated microbiota. Dominant sponge- and seawater-associated bacterial phyla were Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, and Proteobacteria. Comparison of individual sponge taxa and seawater samples between shallow and deep reef sites revealed no significant variation in alpha diversity estimates, while differences in microbial beta diversity (variation in community composition) were significant for Callyspongia sp. sponges and seawater samples. Overall, the sponge-associated microbiota is significantly shaped by host identity across all samples, while the effect of habitat differentiation seems to be less predominant in tropical reef sponges.

    Dynamics of adaptation in experimental yeast populations exposed to gradual and abrupt change in heavy metal concentration
    Gorter, Florien ; Aarts, Mark ; Zwaan, B.J. ; Visser, J.A.G.M. de - \ 2015
    Wageningen UR
    adaptation - ecology - evolutionary - microbial - Environmental variability - evolution - fitness - genetics - population - dynamics - fungi - heavy metals - pleiotropy
    Directional environmental change is a ubiquitous phenomenon that may have profound effects on all living organisms. However, it is unclear how different rates of such change affect the dynamics and outcome of evolution. We studied this question using experimental evolution of heavy metal tolerance in the baker´s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To this end, we grew replicate lines of yeast for 500 generations in the presence of (i) a constant high concentration of cadmium, nickel or zinc, or (ii) a gradually increasing concentration of these metals. We found that gradual environmental change leads to a delay in fitness increase compared to abrupt change, but not necessarily to a different fitness of evolutionary endpoints. For the non-essential metal cadmium this delay is due to reduced fitness differences between genotypes at low metal concentrations, consistent with directional selection to minimize intracellular concentrations of this metal. In contrast, for the essential metals nickel and zinc different genotypes are selected at different concentrations, consistent with stabilizing selection to maintain constant intracellular concentrations of these metals. These findings indicate diverse fitness consequences of evolved tolerance mechanisms for essential and non-essential metals, and imply that the rate of environmental change and the nature of the stressor are crucial determinants of evolutionary dynamics.
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