Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    The complex interactions between flowering behavior and fiber quality in hemp
    Salentijn, Elma M.J. ; Petit, Jordi ; Trindade, Luisa M. - \ 2019
    Frontiers in Plant Science 10 (2019). - ISSN 1664-462X
    Cannabis sativa - Fiber development - Flowering-time - Hemp - Phenology - Sex determination - Short-day plant

    Hemp, Cannabis sativa L., is a sustainable multipurpose fiber crop with high nutrient and water use efficiency and with biomass of excellent quality for textile fibers and construction materials. The yield and quality of hemp biomass are largely determined by the genetic background of the hemp cultivar but are also strongly affected by environmental factors, such as temperature and photoperiod. Hemp is a facultative short-day plant, characterized by a strong adaptation to photoperiod and a great influence of environmental factors on important agronomic traits such as “flowering-time” and “sex determination.” This sensitivity of hemp can cause a considerable degree of heterogeneity, leading to unforeseen yield reductions. Fiber quality for instance is influenced by the developmental stage of hemp at harvest. Also, male and female plants differ in stature and produce fibers with different properties and quality. Next to these causes, there is evidence for specific genotypic variation in fiber quality among hemp accessions. Before improved hemp cultivars can be developed, with specific flowering-times and fiber qualities, and adapted to different geographical regions, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling important phenological traits such as “flowering-time” and “sex determination” in relation to fiber quality in hemp is required. It is well known that genetic factors play a major role in the outcome of both phenological traits, but the major molecular factors involved in this mechanism are not characterized in hemp. Genome sequences and transcriptome data are available but their analysis mainly focused on the cannabinoid pathway for medical purposes. Herein, we review the current knowledge of phenotypic and genetic data available for “flowering-time,” “sex determination,” and “fiber quality” in short-day and dioecious crops, respectively, and compare them with the situation in hemp. A picture emerges for several controlling key genes, for which natural genetic variation may lead to desired flowering behavior, including examples of pleiotropic effects on yield quality and on carbon partitioning. Finally, we discuss the prospects for using this knowledge for the molecular breeding of this sustainable crop via a candidate gene approach.

    Water-and nitrogen-use efficiencies of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) based on whole-canopy measurements and modeling
    Tang, Kailei ; Fracasso, Alessandra ; Struik, Paul C. ; Yin, Xinyou ; Amaducci, Stefano - \ 2018
    Frontiers in Plant Science 9 (2018). - ISSN 1664-462X
    Cannabis sativa L. - Canopy gas exchange - Hemp - Nitrogen use efficiency - Water use efficiency

    Interest in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) as a crop for the biobased economy is growing worldwide because hemp produces a high and valuable biomass while requiring low inputs. To understand the physiological basis of hemp’s resource-use efficiency, canopy gas exchange was assessed using a chamber technique on canopies exposed to a range of nitrogen (N) and water levels. Since canopy transpiration and carbon assimilation were very sensitive to variations in microclimate among canopy chambers, observations were adjusted for microclimatic differences using a physiological canopy model, with leaf-level parameters estimated for hemp from our previous study. Canopy photosynthetic water-use efficiency (PWUEc), defined as the ratio of gross canopy photosynthesis to canopy transpiration, ranged from 4.0 mmol CO2 (mol H2 O)−1 to 7.5 mmol CO2 (mol H2 O)−1. Canopy photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (PNUEc), the ratio of the gross canopy photosynthesis to canopy leaf-N content, ranged from 0.3mol CO2 d−1 (g N)−1 to 0.7mol CO2 d−1 (g N)−1. The effect of N-input levels on PWUEc and PNUEc was largely determined by the N effect on canopy size or leaf area index (LAI), whereas the effect of water-input levels differed between short-and long-term stresses. The effect of short-term water stress was reflected by stomatal regulation. The long-term stress increased leaf senescence, decreased LAI but retained total canopy N content; however, the increased average leaf-N could not compensate for the lost LAI, leading to a decreased PNUEc. Although hemp is known as a resource-use efficient crop, its final biomass yield and nitrogen use efficiency may be restricted by water limitation during growth. Our results also suggest that crop models should take stress-induced senescence into account in addition to stomatal effects if crops experience a prolonged water stress during growth.

    New developments in fiber hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) breeding
    Salentijn, E.M.J. ; Zhang, Qingying ; Amaducci, Stefano ; Yang, Ming ; Trindade, L.M. - \ 2015
    Industrial Crops and Products 68 (2015). - ISSN 0926-6690 - p. 32 - 41.
    Breeding - Fiber quality - Genetics - Hemp

    Fiber hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is a sustainable and high yielding industrial crop that can help to meet the high global demand for fibers. Hemp can be grown for fiber, seeds, and/or for dual purpose in a wide range of geographic zones and climates. Currently the main hemp producing regions in the world are China, Europe, and Canada. The number of new cultivars developed for each of these regions has gradually increased, with each region producing its own typical hemp cultivars for different purposes. In this article, the state of the art of fiber hemp breeding programs in Europe, China, and Canada are reviewed. The breeding strategies and tools used in the breeding of hemp cultivars are discussed. We also provide an overview of genetic diversity in hemp for different traits. In addition, the current knowledge of the main breeding goals for fiber hemp, which are an improvement of fiber quality and fiber yield, breeding for specific cannabinoid profiles, control of flowering behavior, male flowering control, and breeding of cultivars for specific environments are evaluated. Lastly, we discuss the inestimable value of next generation technologies to breed new hemp cultivars that are suitable for a biobased economy.

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