Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    The impact of pectin supplementation on intestinal barrier function in healthy young adults and healthy elderly
    Wilms, Ellen ; Jonkers, Daisy M.A.E. ; Savelkoul, Huub F.J. ; Elizalde, Montserrat ; Tischmann, Lea ; Vos, Paul de; Masclee, Ad A.M. ; Troost, Freddy J. - \ 2019
    Nutrients 11 (2019)7. - ISSN 2072-6643
    Aging - Defense - Dietary fiber - Gastrointestinal - Intestinal permeability - Tight junctions - Tolerance

    Intestinal barrier function is suggested to decrease with aging and may be improved by pectin intake. The aim of this study was to investigate the e ects of four weeks pectin supplementation on gastrointestinal barrier function in vivo and ex vivo in di erent age groups. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel study, 52 healthy young adults (18–40 years) and 48 healthy elderly (65–75 years) received 15 g/day pectin or placebo for four weeks. Pre- and post-intervention, in vivo gastrointestinal permeability by a multisugar test, and defense capacity in mucosal samples were assessed. Sigmoid biopsies were collected post-intervention from subgroups for Ussing chamber experiments and gene transcription of barrier-related genes. Pectin intervention did not a ect in vivo gastroduodenal, small intestinal, colonic, and whole gut permeability in young adults nor in elderly (p ≥ 0.130). Salivary and fecal sIgA and serum IgA were not significantly di erent between pectin versus placebo in both age groups (p ≥ 0.128). In both young adults and elderly, no di erences in transepithelial electrical resistance and fluorescein flux (p ≥ 0.164) and relative expression of genes analyzed (p ≥ 0.222) were found between pectin versus placebo. In conclusion, intestinal barrier function was not a ected by four weeks pectin supplementation neither in healthy young adults nor in healthy elderly.

    Growth rate of broiler chickens is influenced by early life feeding strategy
    Hollemans, M.S. ; Lammers, A. ; Vries, S. de - \ 2018
    In: The XVth European Poultry Conference (EPC). - Zagreb, Croatia : - ISBN 9789082915709 - p. 579 - 579.
    delayed nutrition - early nutrition - Intestinal permeability - compensatory growth
    After hatching in conventional systems, broiler chickens have a delay to nutrition thatcan last for 72h, depending on length of the hatch window, internal hatchery proceduresand transport duration. Previous research on early life feeding strategies has shownnegative effects on bodyweight (BW) gain after delayed nutrition (DN), compared withearly nutrition (EN). However, it is not known whether DN chickens can (partially)compensate for their lower BW between hatch and slaughter. In this study, we tested thehypothesis that DN chickens have an increased growth rate, as a result of compensatorygrowth. Data from 3 independent experiments were used. In these studies, broilerswere subjected to either EN or DN with different durations of DN (38 to 72 h) and daysto slaughter (14 to 35 d). In all experiments, DN groups had lower BW compared withEN which was sustained until slaughter. Relative differences in BW, however, decreasedfrom 114 to 176% post placement to 102 – 112 % at slaughter (35 d). Growth curves of DNand EN chickens were analysed to study whether compensatory growth could explain thedifferences in BW between EN and DN. Absolute average daily gain (aADG) was higher inEN chickens from start until slaughter. To analyse the growth curve independent of BW,relative ADG (rADG) between two ages was calculated as follows:Differences in rADG between DN and EN chickens were greater in the first 14 d (DN:63%, EN: 47%; P < 0.001), but smaller in the remaining grow-out period (14 – 28 d:DN: 18%, EN: 16%; 28 – 35 d: DN: 8%, EN: 7%; both P <0 .001). Based on these results,it seems that DN broilers compensate for their lag in BW during the first 14 d postplacement. As differences in absolute BW were still present at 35 d, the increase in rADGseems insufficient to catch up with EN broilers. EN chickens have higher aADG untilslaughter, however, rADG is lower, showing that growth rate is influenced by feedingstrategy. Previous literature describes interactions between compensatory growth andnutrient composition of diets on nitrogen and fat retention. This may give reason forfuture work to evaluate effects of early life feeding strategy on carcass traits.
    Body weight is affected by early life feeding strategy and hatch moment in broiler chickens
    Hollemans, M.S. ; Noorloos, Marit ; Vries, S. de; Lammers, A. - \ 2018
    In: The XVth European Poultry Conference (EPC). - Zagreb, Croatia : - ISBN 9789082915709 - p. 259 - 259.
    delayed nutrition - early nutrition - Intestinal permeability - compensatory growth
    After hatching in conventional systems, broiler chickens have a delay to nutrition that can last for 72h, depending on length of the hatch window, internal hatchery procedures and transport duration. Previous research on early life feeding strategies has shown negative effects on bodyweight (BW) gain after delayed nutrition (DN), compared with early nutrition (EN). However, it is not known whether DN chickens can (partially)compensate for their lower BW between hatch and slaughter. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DN chickens have an increased growth rate, as a result of compensatory growth. Data from 3 independent experiments were used. In these studies, broilers were subjected to either EN or DN with different durations of DN (38 to 72 h) and days to slaughter (14 to 35 d). In all experiments, DN groups had lower BW compared withEN which was sustained until slaughter. Relative differences in BW, however, decreased from 114 to 176% post placement to 102 – 112 % at slaughter (35 d). Growth curves of DN and EN chickens were analysed to study whether compensatory growth could explain the differences in BW between EN and DN. Absolute average daily gain (aADG) was higher in EN chickens from start until slaughter. To analyse the growth curve independent of BW, relative ADG (rADG) between two ages was calculated as follows: Differences in rADG between DN and EN chickens were greater in the first 14 d (DN:63%, EN: 47%; P < 0.001), but smaller in the remaining grow-out period (14 – 28 d:DN: 18%, EN: 16%; 28 – 35 d: DN: 8%, EN: 7%; both P <0 .001). Based on these results,it seems that DN broilers compensate for their lag in BW during the first 14 d postplacement. As differences in absolute BW were still present at 35 d, the increase in rADG seems insufficient to catch up with EN broilers. EN chickens have higher aADG until slaughter, however, rADG is lower, showing that growth rate is influenced by feeding strategy. Previous literature describes interactions between compensatory growth and nutrient composition of diets on nitrogen and fat retention. This may give reason for future work to evaluate effects of early life feeding strategy on carcass traits.
    Endurance exercise increases intestinal uptake of the peanut allergen Ara h 6 after peanut consumption in humans
    Janssen Duijghuijsen, Lonneke M. ; Norren, Klaske Van; Grefte, Sander ; Koppelman, Stef J. ; Lenaerts, Kaatje ; Keijer, Jaap ; Witkamp, Renger F. ; Wichers, Harry J. - \ 2017
    Nutrients 9 (2017)1. - ISSN 2072-6643
    Allergen - Ara h 6 - Endurance exercise - Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis - Intestinal permeability

    Controlled studies on the effect of exercise on intestinal uptake of protein are scarce and underlying mechanisms largely unclear. We studied the uptake of the major allergen Ara h 6 following peanut consumption in an exercise model and compared this with changes in markers of intestinal permeability and integrity. Ten overnight-fasted healthy non-allergic men (n = 4) and women (n = 6) (23 ± 4 years) ingested 100 g of peanuts together with a lactulose/rhamnose (L/R) solution, followed by rest or by 60 min cycling at 70% of their maximal workload. Significantly higher, though variable, levels of Ara h 6 in serum were found during exercise compared to rest (Peak p = 0.03, area under the curve p = 0.006), with individual fold changes ranging from no increase to an increase of over 150-fold in the uptake of Ara h 6. Similarly, uptake of lactulose (2-18 fold change, p = 0.0009) and L/R ratios (0.4-7.9 fold change, p = 0.04) were significantly increased which indicates an increase in intestinal permeability. Intestinal permeability and uptake of Ara h 6 were strongly correlated (r = 0.77, p <0.0001 for lactulose and Ara h 6). Endurance exercise after consumption may lead to increased paracellular intestinal uptake of food proteins.

    Characterizing microbiota-independent effects of oligosaccharides on intestinal epithelial cells : insight into the role of structure and size: Structure–activity relationships of non-digestible oligosaccharides
    Akbari, Peyman ; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna ; Willems, Rianne H.A.M. ; Difilippo, Elisabetta ; Schols, Henk A. ; Schoterman, Margriet H.C. ; Garssen, Johan ; Braber, Saskia - \ 2017
    European Journal of Nutrition 56 (2017)5. - ISSN 1436-6207 - p. 1919 - 1930.
    Caco-2 cells - CXCL8 - Degree of polymerization - Intestinal permeability - Non-digestible oligosaccharides - Tight junctions
    Purpose: The direct effects of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), including Vivinal® GOS syrup (VGOS) and purified Vivinal® GOS (PGOS), on the epithelial integrity and corresponding interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) release were examined in a Caco-2 cell model for intestinal barrier dysfunction. To investigate structure–activity relationships, the effects of individual DP fractions of VGOS were evaluated. Moreover, the obtained results with GOS were compared with Caco-2 monolayers incubated with fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin. Methods: Caco-2 monolayers were pretreated (24 h) with or without specific oligosaccharides or DP fractions of VGOS (DP2 to DP6) before being exposed for 12 or 24 h to the fungal toxin deoxynivalenol (DON). Transepithelial electrical resistance and lucifer yellow permeability were measured to investigate barrier integrity. A calcium switch assay was used to study the reassembly of tight junction proteins. Release of CXCL8, a typical marker for inflammation, was quantified by ELISA. Results: In comparison with PGOS, FOS and inulin, VGOS showed the most pronounced protective effect on the DON-induced impairment of the monolayer integrity, acceleration of the tight junction reassembly and the subsequent CXCL8 release. DP2 and DP3 in concentrations occurring in VGOS prevented the DON-induced epithelial barrier disruption, which could be related to their high prevalence in VGOS. However, no effects of the separate DP GOS fractions were observed on CXCL8 release. Conclusions: This comparative study demonstrates the direct, microbiota-independent effects of oligosaccharides on the intestinal barrier function and shows the differences between individual galacto- and fructo-oligosaccharides. This microbiota-independent effect of oligosaccharides depends on the oligosaccharide structure, DP length and concentration.
    Bacterial translocation and in vivo assessment of intestinal barrier permeability in Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with and without soyabean meal-induced inflammation
    Mosberian Tanha, Peyman ; Overland, M. ; Landsverk, Thor ; Reveco, Felipe E. ; Schrama, J.W. ; Roem, A.J. ; Agger, Jane W. ; Midland, Liv T. - \ 2016
    Journal of Nutritional Science 5 (2016). - ISSN 2048-6790 - 10 p.
    rainbow trout - soyabean meal - enteritis - Intestinal permeability - permeability markers
    The primary aim of this experiment was to evaluate the intestinal barrier permeability in vivo in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed increasing levels of soyabean meal (SBM). The relationship between SBM-induced enteritis (SBMIE) and the permeability markers was also investigated. Our results showed that the mean score of morphological parameters was significantly higher as a result of 37·5 % SBM inclusion in the diet, while the scores of fish fed 25 % SBM or lower were not different from those of the fish meal-fed controls (P < 0·05). SBMIE was found in the distal intestine (DI) in 18 % of the fish (eleven of sixty): ten in the 37·5 % SBM-fed group and one in the 25 % SBM-fed group. Sugar markers in plasma showed large variation among individuals probably due to variation in feed intake. We found, however, a significant linear increase in the level of plasma d-lactate with increasing SBM inclusion level (P < 0·0001). Plasma concentration of endotoxin was not significantly different in groups with or without SBMIE. Some individual fish showed high values of endotoxin in blood, but the same individuals did not show any bacterial translocation. Plasma bacterial DNA was detected in 28 % of the fish with SBMIE, and 8 % of non-SBMIE fish (P = 0·07). Plasma concentration of d-lactate was significantly higher in fish with SBMIE (P < 0·0001). To conclude, SBMIE in the DI of rainbow trout was associated with an increase in bacterial translocation and plasma d-lactate concentration, suggesting that these permeability markers can be used to evaluate intestinal permeability in vivo.
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