Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==Quercus robur
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Data from: Multi-variable approach pinpoints origin of oak wood with higher precision
Akhmetzyanov, L. ; Buras, Allan ; Sass-Klaassen, U.G.W. ; Ouden, J. den; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Groenendijk, Peter ; García-González, Ignacio - \ 2019
dendroprovenancing - earlywood vessels - latewood width - multi-variable approach - region-specific growth patterns - Quercus spp. - wood anatomy - Quercus robur - Quercus petraea - Quercus pyrenaica - Quercus faginea
Aim: Spatial variations of environmental conditions translate into biogeographic growth patterns of tree growth. This fact is used to identify the origin of timber by means of dendroprovenancing. Yet, dendroprovenancing attempts are based on ring-widths measurements, and neglect additional tree-ring parameters. To explore the effect of including additional variables in dendroprovenancing, we investigate whether and, if so, why the incorporation of wood-anatomical parameters can increase the precision of identifying the origin of oak wood. Since such features reflect environmental conditions of different periods – which vary between source regions – we hypothesize that their inclusion allows more precise dendroprovenancing. Location: Europe, Spain. Taxon: Quercus robur L., Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Quercus faginea Lam., Quercus pyrenaica Willd. Methods: We sampled four oak species resembling a longitudinal and an elevational/continental gradients. We measured multiple tree-ring variables to (1) extract meaningful variables, (2) represent statistical relations among variables, (3) analyse regional-specific growth patterns in individual time series and (4) determine underlying climate-growth relationships. Leave-one-out analyses were used to test whether a combination of selected variables allows dendroprovenancing of a randomly selected tree within the area. Results: A combination of latewood width and earlywood vessels size can be used to pin-point the origin of oak wood with higher precision than latewood width only. Variation in latewood widths appointed the wood to areas across the longitudinal gradient, whereas variation in vessels assigned wood to locations along a latitudinal/topographic gradient. The climatic factors behind these gradients are respectively an East-West gradient in June-July temperature, and a North-South gradient in winter/ spring temperatures. The leave-one-out analyses supported the robustness of the results. Main conclusions: Integration of multiple tree-ring variables in combination with multivariate techniques leads to higher precision in the dendroprovenancing of ring-porous oak species.
Species and structural diversity affect growth of oak, but not pine, in uneven-aged mature forests
Vanhellemont, Margot ; Bijlsma, Rienk Jan ; Keersmaeker, Luc De; Vandekerkhove, Kris ; Verheyen, Kris - \ 2018
Basic and Applied Ecology 27 (2018). - ISSN 1439-1791 - p. 41 - 50.
Biodiversity - Ecosystem functioning - Pinus sylvestris - Productivity - Quercus petraea - Quercus robur - Temperate forest
The effects of mixing tree species on tree growth and stand production have been abundantly studied, mostly looking at tree species diversity effects while controlling for stand density and structure. Regarding the shift towards managing forests as complex adaptive systems, we also need insight into the effects of structural diversity. Strict forest reserves, left for spontaneous development, offer unique opportunities for studying the effects of diversity in tree species and stand structure. We used data from repeated inventories in ten forest reserves in the Netherlands and northern Belgium to study the growth of pine and oak. We investigated whether the diversity of a tree's local neighbourhood (i.e., species and structural diversity) is important in explaining its basal area growth. For the subcanopy oak trees, we found a negative effect of the tree species richness of the local neighbours, which - in the studied forests - was closely related to the share of shade-casting tree species in the neighbourhood. The growth of the taller oak trees was positively affected by the height diversity of the neighbour trees. Pine tree growth showed no relation with neighbourhood diversity. Tree growth decreased with neighbourhood density for both species (although no significant relationship was found for the small pines). We found no overall diversity-growth relationship in the studied uneven-aged mature forests; the relationship depended on tree species identity and the aspect of diversity considered (species vs. structural diversity).
FEM growth and yield data monocultures - Common Oak (revised version)
Oosterbaan, A. ; Jansen, J.J. ; Goudzwaard, L. ; Oldenburger, J.F. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2016
growth and yield - even-aged monoculture forest - understory - tree height - tree diameter - crown class - coordinates stem positions - age - top height - dominant height - dominant diameter - monitoring - common oak - Quercus robur
The current database is a part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species with only a few plots, even-aged mixed species forest plots, uneven-aged natural forest, uneven-aged selection forest and roadside plantations of poplar. The FEM growth and yield data base is currently supervised by Jan den Ouden and Frits Mohren.
Flood-ring formation and root development in response to experimental flooding of young Quercus robur trees
Copini, Paul ; Ouden, Jan den; Robert, Elisabeth M.R. ; Tardif, Jacques C. ; Loesberg, Walter A. ; Goudzwaard, Leo ; Sass-Klaassen, Ute - \ 2016
Frontiers in Plant Science 7 (2016)JUNE2016. - ISSN 1664-462X
Flooding - Hypoxia - Leaf phenology - Pedunculate oak - Quercus robur - Root development - Vessel development

Spring flooding in riparian forests can cause significant reductions in earlywood-vessel size in submerged stem parts of ring-porous tree species, leading to the presence of ‘flood rings’ that can be used as a proxy to reconstruct past flooding events, potentially over millennia. The mechanism of flood-ring formation and the relation with timing and duration of flooding are still to be elucidated. In this study, we experimentally flooded 4-year-old Quercus robur trees at three spring phenophases (late bud dormancy, budswell, and internode expansion) and over different flooding durations (2, 4, and 6 weeks) to a stem height of 50 cm. The effect of flooding on root and vessel development was assessed immediately after the flooding treatment and at the end of the growing season. Ring width and earlywood-vessel size and density were measured at 25- and 75-cm stem height and collapsed vessels were recorded. Stem flooding inhibited earlywood-vessel development in flooded stem parts. In addition, flooding upon budswell and internode expansion led to collapsed earlywood vessels below the water level. At the end of the growing season, mean earlywood- vessel size in the flooded stem parts (upon budswell and internode expansion) was always reduced by approximately 50% compared to non-flooded stem parts and 55% compared to control trees. This reduction was already present 2 weeks after flooding and occurred independent of flooding duration. Stem and root flooding were associated with significant root dieback after 4 and 6 weeks and mean radial growth was always reduced with increasing flooding duration. By comparing stem and root flooding, we conclude that flood rings only occur after stem flooding. As earlywood- vessel development was hampered during flooding, a considerable number of narrow earlywood vessels present later in the season, must have been formed after the actual flooding events. Our study indicates that root dieback, together with strongly reduced hydraulic conductivity due to anomalously narrow earlywood vessels in flooded stem parts, contribute to reduced radial growth after flooding events. Our findings support the value of flood rings to reconstruct spring flooding events that occurred prior to instrumental flood records.

FEM growth and yield data mixed species forest
Bartelink, H.H. ; Jansen, J.J. ; Goudzwaard, L. ; Lu, Huicui ; Oldenburger, J.F. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2016
growth and yield - even aged mixed species forest - tree diameter - tree height - crown class - crown diameter - crown base - coordination stem positions - age - top height - dominant height - dominant diameter - monitoring - ash common beech - common oak - Douglas fir - Japanese larch - Scots pine - silver birch - sycamore - Acer pseudoplatanus - Betula pendula - Fagus sylvatica - Fraxinus excelsior - Larix kaempferi - Quercus robur - Pinus sylvestris - Pseudotsuga mensisii
The current database is part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species with only a few plots like grand fir, even-aged mixed species forest plots, uneven-aged natural forest, uneven-aged selection forest and roadside plantations of poplar). The FEM growth and yield data base is currently supervised by Jan den Ouden and Frits Mohren.
FEM growth and yield data - Common oak
Oosterbaan, A. ; Jansen, J.J. ; Goudzwaard, L. ; Lu, Huicui ; Oldenburger, J.F. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2016
growth and yield - even-aged monoculture forest - understory - tree height - tree diameter - crown class - coordinates stem positions - age - top height - dominant height - dominant diameter - monitoring - Common oak - Quercus robur
The current database is a part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collecction of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species with only a few plots, even-aged mixed species forest plots, uneven-aged natural forest, uneven-aged selection forest and roadside plantations of poplar. The FEM growth and yield data base is currently supervised by Jan den Ouden and Frits Mohren.
Beyond metacommunity paradigms : Habitat configuration, life history, and movement shape an herbivore community on oak
Zheng, Chaozhi ; Ovaskainen, Otso ; Roslin, Tomas ; Tack, Ayco J.M. - \ 2015
Ecology 96 (2015)12. - ISSN 0012-9658 - p. 3175 - 3185.
Bayesian community model - Dispersal ability - Habitat configuration - Metacommunity - Movement - Oak herbivore communities - Plant-insect interactions - Quercus robur - Southern Finland

Many empirical studies of metacommunities have focused on the classification of observational patterns into four contrasting paradigms characterized by different levels of movement and habitat heterogeneity. However, deeper insight into the underlying local and regional processes may be derived from a combination of long-term observational data and experimental studies. With the aim of exploring forces structuring the insect metacommunity on oak, we fit a hierarchical Bayesian state-space model to data from observations and experiments. The fitted model reveals large variation in species-specific dispersal abilities and basic reproduction numbers, R0. The residuals from the model show only weak correlations among species, suggesting a lack of strong interspecific interactions. Simulations with modelderived parameter estimates indicate that habitat configuration and species attributes both contribute substantially to structuring insect communities. Overall, our findings demonstrate that community-level variation in movement and life history are key drivers of metacommunity dynamics.

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