Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==Salicylic acid
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Airborne host–plant manipulation by whiteflies via an inducible blend of plant volatiles
Zhang, Peng Jun ; Wei, Jia Ning ; Zhao, Chan ; Zhang, Ya Fen ; Li, Chuan You ; Liu, Shu Sheng ; Dicke, Marcel ; Yu, Xiao Ping ; Turlings, Ted C.J. - \ 2019
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116 (2019)15. - ISSN 0027-8424 - p. 7387 - 7396.
Herbivore-induced plant volatiles - Jasmonic acid - Salicylic acid - Tomato - Whiteflies

The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is one of the world’s most important invasive crop pests, possibly because it manipulates plant defense signaling. Upon infestation by whiteflies, plants mobilize salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, which mainly target pathogens. In contrast, jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent defenses are gradually suppressed in whitefly-infested plants. The down-regulation of JA defenses make plants more susceptible to insects, including whiteflies. Here, we report that this host–plant manipulation extends to neighboring plants via airborne signals. Plants respond to insect attack with the release of a blend of inducible volatiles. Perception of these volatiles by neighboring plants usually primes them to prepare for an imminent attack. Here, however, we show that whitefly-induced tomato plant volatiles prime SA-dependent defenses and suppress JA-dependent defenses, thus rendering neighboring tomato plants more susceptible to whiteflies. Experiments with volatiles from caterpillar-damaged and pathogen-infected plants, as well as with synthetic volatiles, confirm that whiteflies modify the quality of neighboring plants for their offspring via whitefly-inducible plant volatiles.

Induced resistance against western flower thrips by the pseudomonas syringae-derived defense elicitors in tomato
Chen, Gang ; Escobar-Bravo, Rocío ; Kim, Hye Kyong ; Leiss, Kirsten A. ; Klinkhamer, Peter G.L. - \ 2018
Frontiers in Plant Science 9 (2018). - ISSN 1664-462X
Coronatine - Frankliniella occidentalis - Induced plant defenses - Jasmonic acid - Pseudomonas syringae - Salicylic acid - Solanum lycopersicum - Type VI glandular trichomes

Western flower thrips (WFT) Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) is a key agricultural pest of cultivated tomatoes. Induced host plant resistance by activating jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway constitutes a promising method for WFT control. The phytotoxin coronatine (COR), produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst), mimics the plant hormone JA-Isoleucine and can promote resistance against herbivorous arthropods. Here we determined the effect of Pst and COR on tomato resistance against WFT, induction of JA and salicylic acid (SA) associated defenses, and plant chemistry. Additionally, we investigated the presence of other components in Pst-derived and filtered culture medium, and their interactive effect with COR on tomato resistance to WFT. Our results showed that infiltration of COR or Pst reduced WFT feeding damage in tomato plants. COR and Pst induced the expression of JA-associated gene and protein marker. COR also induced expression of a SA-related responsive gene, although at much less magnitude. Activation of JA defenses in COR and Pst infiltrated plants did not affect density of type VI leaf trichomes, which are defenses reported to be induced by JA. An untargeted metabolomic analysis showed that both treatments induced strong changes in infiltrated leaves, but leaf responses to COR or Pst slightly differed. Application of the Pst-derived and filtered culture medium, containing COR but not viable Pst, also increased tomato resistance against WFT confirming that the induction of tomato defenses does not require a living Pst population to be present in the plant. Infiltration of tomato plants with low concentrations of COR in diluted Pst-derived and filtered culture medium reduced WFT feeding damage in a greater magnitude than infiltration with an equivalent amount of pure COR indicating that other elicitors are present in the medium. This was confirmed by the fact that the medium from a COR-mutant of Pst also strongly reduced silver damage. In conclusion, our results indicate that induction of JA defenses by COR, Pst infection, the medium of Pst and the medium of a Pst COR- mutant increased resistance against WFT. This was not mediated by the reinforcement of leaf trichome densities, but rather the induction of chemical defenses.

A plant-based chemical genomics screen for the identification of flowering inducers
Fiers, Martijn ; Hoogenboom, Jorin ; Brunazzi, Alice ; Wennekes, Tom ; Angenent, Gerco C. ; Immink, Richard G.H. - \ 2017
Plant Methods 13 (2017). - ISSN 1746-4811 - 9 p.
APETALA1 - Arabidopsis - Chemical genomics - Flowering - Luciferase - Salicylic acid

Background: Floral timing is a carefully regulated process, in which the plant determines the optimal moment to switch from the vegetative to reproductive phase. While there are numerous genes known that control flowering time, little information is available on chemical compounds that are able to influence this process. We aimed to discover novel compounds that are able to induce flowering in the model plant Arabidopsis. For this purpose we developed a plant-based screening platform that can be used in a chemical genomics study. Results: Here we describe the set-up of the screening platform and various issues and pitfalls that need to be addressed in order to perform a chemical genomics screening on Arabidopsis plantlets. We describe the choice for a molecular marker, in combination with a sensitive reporter that's active in plants and is sufficiently sensitive for detection. In this particular screen, the firefly Luciferase marker was used, fused to the regulatory sequences of the floral meristem identity gene APETALA1 (AP1), which is an early marker for flowering. Using this screening platform almost 9000 compounds were screened, in triplicate, in 96-well plates at a concentration of 25μM. One of the identified potential flowering inducing compounds was studied in more detail and named Flowering1 (F1). F1 turned out to be an analogue of the plant hormone Salicylic acid (SA) and appeared to be more potent than SA in the induction of flowering. The effect could be confirmed by watering Arabidopsis plants with SA or F1, in which F1 gave a significant reduction in time to flowering in comparison to SA treatment or the control. Conclusions: In this study a chemical genomics screening platform was developed to discover compounds that can induce flowering in Arabidopsis. This platform was used successfully, to identify a compound that can speed-up flowering in Arabidopsis.

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