Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==Whiteflies
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Airborne host–plant manipulation by whiteflies via an inducible blend of plant volatiles
Zhang, Peng Jun ; Wei, Jia Ning ; Zhao, Chan ; Zhang, Ya Fen ; Li, Chuan You ; Liu, Shu Sheng ; Dicke, Marcel ; Yu, Xiao Ping ; Turlings, Ted C.J. - \ 2019
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116 (2019)15. - ISSN 0027-8424 - p. 7387 - 7396.
Herbivore-induced plant volatiles - Jasmonic acid - Salicylic acid - Tomato - Whiteflies

The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is one of the world’s most important invasive crop pests, possibly because it manipulates plant defense signaling. Upon infestation by whiteflies, plants mobilize salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, which mainly target pathogens. In contrast, jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent defenses are gradually suppressed in whitefly-infested plants. The down-regulation of JA defenses make plants more susceptible to insects, including whiteflies. Here, we report that this host–plant manipulation extends to neighboring plants via airborne signals. Plants respond to insect attack with the release of a blend of inducible volatiles. Perception of these volatiles by neighboring plants usually primes them to prepare for an imminent attack. Here, however, we show that whitefly-induced tomato plant volatiles prime SA-dependent defenses and suppress JA-dependent defenses, thus rendering neighboring tomato plants more susceptible to whiteflies. Experiments with volatiles from caterpillar-damaged and pathogen-infected plants, as well as with synthetic volatiles, confirm that whiteflies modify the quality of neighboring plants for their offspring via whitefly-inducible plant volatiles.

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