Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Use of non-growing Lactococcus lactis cell suspensions for production of volatile metabolites with direct relevance for flavour formation during dairy fermentations
    Bunt, B. van de; Bron, P.A. ; Sijtsma, L. ; Vos, W.M. de; Hugenholtz, J. - \ 2014
    Microbial Cell Factories 13 (2014). - ISSN 1475-2859 - 9 p.
    amino-acid catabolism - complete genome sequence - aroma compounds - cheddar cheese - lactobacillus-helveticus - streptococcus-lactis - proteolytic systems - alpha-ketoglutarate - l-leucine - bacteria
    Background Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium that has been used for centuries in the production of a variety of cheeses, as these bacteria rapidly acidify milk and greatly contribute to the flavour of the fermentation end-products. After a short growth phase during cheese ripening L. lactis enters an extended non-growing state whilst still strongly contributing to amino acid-derived flavour formation. Here, a research approach is presented that allows investigation of strain- and amino acid-specific flavour formation during the non-growing state. Results Non-growing cells of five selected L. lactis strains were demonstrated to degrade amino acids into flavour compounds that are relevant in food fermentations and differs greatly from production of flavour compounds using growing cells. As observed earlier in other research set-ups and with other microorganisms, addition of NADH, a-ketoglutarate and pyridoxal-5-phosphate was demonstrated to be essential for optimal flavour formation, suggesting that intracellular pools of these substrates are too low for the significant production of the flavour compounds. Production of flavours during the non-growing phase strongly depends on the individual amino acids that were supplied, on the presence of other amino acids (mixtures versus single compounds), and on the strain used. Moreover, we observed that the plasmid-free model strains L. lactis MG1363 and IL1403 produce relatively low amounts of flavour components under the various conditions tested. Conclusions By using this simplified and rapid approach to study flavour formation by non-growing lactic acid bacteria, lengthy ripening periods are no longer required to assess the capacity of strains to produce flavours in the long, non-growing state of dairy fermentation. In addition, this method also provides insight into the conversion of single amino acids versus the conversion of a mixture of amino acids as produced during protein degradation. The generated results are complementary to earlier generated datasets using growing cells, allowing assessment of the full flavour forming potential of strains used as starter cultures in industrial food fermentation processes.
    Genome-scale metabolic model for Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and its application to the analysis of flavor formation
    Flahaut, N.A.L. ; Wiersma, A. ; Bunt, B. van der; Martens, D.E. ; Schaap, P.J. ; Sijtsma, L. ; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P. ; Vos, W.M. de - \ 2013
    Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 97 (2013)19. - ISSN 0175-7598 - p. 8729 - 8739.
    amino-acid catabolism - streptococcus-lactis - cremoris mg1363 - steady-state - bacteria - growth - reconstruction - networks - systems - cheese
    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is a paradigm strain for lactococci used in industrial dairy fermentations. However, despite of its importance for process development, no genome-scale metabolic model has been reported thus far. Moreover, current models for other lactococci only focus on growth and sugar degradation. A metabolic model that includes nitrogen metabolism and flavor-forming pathways is instrumental for the understanding and designing new industrial applications of these lactic acid bacteria. A genome-scale, constraint-based model of the metabolism and transport in L. lactis MG1363, accounting for 518 genes, 754 reactions, and 650 metabolites, was developed and experimentally validated. Fifty-nine reactions are directly or indirectly involved in flavor formation. Flux Balance Analysis and Flux Variability Analysis were used to investigate flux distributions within the whole metabolic network. Anaerobic carbon-limited continuous cultures were used for estimating the energetic parameters. A thorough model-driven analysis showing a highly flexible nitrogen metabolism, e.g., branched-chain amino acid catabolism which coupled with the redox balance, is pivotal for the prediction of the formation of different flavor compounds. Furthermore, the model predicted the formation of volatile sulfur compounds as a result of the fermentation. These products were subsequently identified in the experimental fermentations carried out. Thus, the genome-scale metabolic model couples the carbon and nitrogen metabolism in L. lactis MG1363 with complete known catabolic pathways leading to flavor formation. The model provided valuable insights into the metabolic networks underlying flavor formation and has the potential to contribute to new developments in dairy industries and cheese-flavor research.
    System-Wide Hypersensitive Response-Associated Transcriptome and Metabolome Reprogramming in Tomato
    Etalo, D.W. ; Stulemeijer, I.J.E. ; Esse, H.P. van; Vos, R.C.H. de; Bouwmeester, H.J. ; Joosten, M.H.A.J. - \ 2013
    Plant Physiology 162 (2013)3. - ISSN 0032-0889 - p. 1599 - 1617.
    programmed cell-death - pathogen pseudomonas-syringae - campestris pv. vesicatoria - glutathione s-transferases - amino-acid catabolism - leaf rust resistance - higher-plant cells - mass-spectrometry - cladosporium-fulvum - functional-analysis
    The hypersensitive response (HR) is considered to be the hallmark of the resistance response of plants to pathogens. To study HR-associated transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), we used plants that express both a resistance gene to Cladosporium fulvum and the matching avirulence gene of this pathogen. In these plants, massive reprogramming occurred, and we found that the HR and associated processes are highly energy demanding. Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, hydrolysis of sugars, and lipid catabolism are used as alternative sources of amino acids, energy, and carbon skeletons, respectively. We observed strong accumulation of secondary metabolites, such as hydroxycinnamic acid amides. Coregulated expression of WRKY transcription factors and genes known to be involved in the HR, in addition to a strong enrichment of the W-box WRKY-binding motif in the promoter sequences of the coregulated genes, point to WRKYs as the most prominent orchestrators of the HR. Our study has revealed several novel HR-related genes, and reverse genetics tools will allow us to understand the role of each individual component in the HR.
    Arginine metabolism in sugar deprived Lactococcus lactis enhances survival and cellular activity, while supporting flavour production
    Brandsma, J.B. ; Kraats, I. van de; Abee, T. ; Zwietering, M.H. ; Meijer, W.C. - \ 2012
    Food Microbiology 29 (2012)1. - ISSN 0740-0020 - p. 27 - 32.
    amino-acid catabolism - aroma compounds - lactobacillus-helveticus - carbohydrate starvation - dehydrogenase-activity - alpha-ketoglutarate - semihard cheese - bacteria - conversion - aminotransferases
    Flavour development in cheese is affected by the integrity of Lactococcus lactis cells. Disintegrated cells enhance for instance the enzymatic degradation of casein to free amino acids, while integer cells are needed to produce specific flavour compounds from amino acids. The impact of the cellular activity of these integer cells on flavour production remains to be elucidated. In this study we investigated whether lactose-deprived L. lactis cells that use arginine as an alternative energy source can extend cellular activity and produce more specific flavours. In cheese experiments we demonstrated that arginine metabolising cells survived about 3 times longer than non-arginine metabolising cells, which suggests prolonged cellular activity. Cellular activity and flavour production of L. lactis was further studied in vitro to enable controlled arginine supplementation. Comparable with the results found in cheese, the survival rates of in vitro incubated cells improved when arginine was metabolised. Furthermore, elongated cellular activity was reflected in 3–4-fold increased activity of flavour generating enzymes. The observed prolonged cellular activity resulted in about 2-fold higher concentrations of typical Gouda cheese flavours. These findings provide new leads for composing starter cultures that will produce specific flavour compounds
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