Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Limits to genetic rescue by outcross in pedigree dogs
    Windig, J.J. ; Doekes, H.P. - \ 2018
    Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics 135 (2018)3. - ISSN 0931-2668 - p. 238 - 248.
    conservation genetics - dogs - genetic defects

    Outcrossing should reduce inbreeding levels and associated negative effects in highly inbred populations. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of different outcrossing schemes using computer simulations. The inbreeding rate estimated for a 25-year period of 2.1% per generation in a highly inbred dog breed reduced to 1.8% when a single litter was produced by an outcross without backcrosses. To reduce the inbreeding rate below 1%, more than eight of the 14 litters born yearly in the recipient breed had to be outcrossed. However, outcrossing in pedigree dogs is usually followed by backcrossing and generally involves one or a few litters. Backcrossing reduced the effect of outcrossing considerably. When two litters were produced by an outcross followed by one generation of backcross, the inbreeding rate was 2.0% per generation. Continuously outcrossing was more effective than a single or a few outcrosses. When each newborn litter during 25 years had a 5% chance of being produced by an outcross, the inbreeding rate reduced to −0.2%. To investigate the possibility that new alleles were introduced from the donor population into the recipient population, the fate of different type of alleles (varying from completely lethal to beneficial) before and after an outcross was investigated by first simulating 80 years of natural selection prior to the outcross and then different types of outcross. Because natural selection reduced the frequency of lethal alleles before outcrossing, the introduction of a lethal allele that was segregating in the donor breed but not in the recipient breed occurred rarely. Introduction of slightly detrimental alleles or neutral alleles occurred more frequently. In conclusion, outcrossing only had a limited short-term effect unless repeated continuously. Nevertheless, it may help to buy time in which the population structure can be changed so that the effective population size increases.

    Genomic sequencing and microsatellite marker development for Boswellia papyrifera, an economically important but threatened tree native to dry tropical forests
    Addisalem, A.B. ; Esselink, G. ; Bongers, F. ; Smulders, M.J.M. - \ 2015
    AoB Plants 7 (2015). - ISSN 2041-2851 - 11 p.
    populus-nigra l. - conservation genetics - frankincense - populations - ethiopia - database - plants - reads - tool - dna
    Microsatellite (or simple sequence repeat, SSR) markers are highly informative DNA markers often used in conservation genetic research. Next-generation sequencing enables efficient development of large numbers of SSR markers at lower costs. Boswellia papyrifera is an economically important tree species used for frankincense production, an aromatic resinous gum exudate from bark. It grows in dry tropical forests in Africa and is threatened by a lack of rejuvenation. To help guide conservation efforts for this endangered species, we conducted an analysis of its genomic DNA sequences using Illumina paired-end sequencing. The genome size was estimated at 705 Mb per haploid genome. The reads contained one microsatellite repeat per 5.7 kb. Based on a subset of these repeats, we developed 46 polymorphic SSR markers that amplified 2-12 alleles in 10 genotypes. This set included 30 trinucleotide repeat markers, four tetranucleotide repeat markers, six pentanucleotide markers and six hexanucleotide repeat markers. Several markers were cross-transferable to Boswellia pirrotae and B. popoviana. In addition, retrotransposons were identified, the reads were assembled and several contigs were identified with similarity to genes of the terpene and terpenoid backbone synthesis pathways, which form the major constituents of the bark resin.
    Data from: Testing models of speciation from genome sequences: divergence and asymmetric admixture in Island Southeast Asian Sus species during the Plio-Pleistocene climatic fluctuations
    Frantz, L.A.F. ; Madsen, O. ; Megens, H.J.W.C. ; Groenen, M. ; Lohse, H. - \ 2014
    Wageningen UR
    speciation - hybridization - population genetics - empirical - phylogeography - genomics / proteomics - conservation genetics
    In many temperate regions, ice ages promoted range contractions into refugia resulting in divergence (and potentially speciation), while warmer periods led to range expansions and hybridization. However, the impact these climatic oscillations had in many parts of the tropics remains elusive. Here, we investigate this issue using genome sequences of three pig (Sus) species, two of which are found on islands of the Sunda-shelf shallow seas in Island Southeast Asia (ISEA). A previous study revealed signatures of inter-specific admixture between these Sus species (Frantz et al. (2013) Genome sequencing reveals fine scale diversification and reticulation history during speciation in Sus. Genome biology, 14, R107). However, the timing, directionality and extent of this admixture remain unknown. Here we use a likelihood based model comparison to more finely resolve this admixture history and test whether it was mediated by humans or occurred naturally. Our analyses suggest that inter-specific admixture between Sunda-shelf species was most likely asymmetric and occurred long before the arrival of humans in the region. More precisely, we show that these species diverged during the late Pliocene but around 23% of their genomes have been affected by admixture during the later Pleistocene climatic transition. In addition, we show that our method provides a significant improvement over D-statistics which are uninformative about the direction of admixture.
    Variation in European harbour seal immune response genes and susceptibility to phocine distemper virus (PDV)
    McCarthy, A.J. ; Shaw, M. ; Jepson, P.D. ; Brasseur, S.M.J.M. ; Reijnders, P.J.H. ; Goodman, S.J. - \ 2011
    Infection, Genetics and Evolution 11 (2011)7. - ISSN 1567-1348 - p. 1616 - 1623.
    subacute sclerosing-panencephalitis - measles-virus - conservation genetics - cellular receptor - whole-genome - disease - association - vitulina - polymorphisms - populations
    Phocine distemper virus (PDV) has caused two mass mortalities of European harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in recent decades. Levels of mortality varied considerably among European populations in both the 1988 and 2002 epidemics, with higher mortality in continental European populations in comparison to UK populations. High levels of genetic differentiation at neutral makers among seal populations allow for the possibility that there could be potential genetic differences at functional loci that may account for some of the variation in mortality. Recent genome sequencing of carnivore species and development of genomic tools have now made it possible to explore the possible contribution of variation in candidate genes from harbour seals in relation to the differential mortality patterns. We assessed variation in eight genes (CD46, IFNG, IL4, IL8, IL10, RARa, SLAM and TLR2) encoding key proteins involved in host cellular interactions with Morbilliviruses and the relationship of variants to disease status. This work constitutes the first genetic association study for Morbillivirus disease susceptibility in a non-model organism, and for a natural mortality event. We found no variation in harbour seals from across Europe in the protein coding domains of the viral receptors SLAM and CD46, but SNPs were present in SLAM intron 2. SNPs were also present in IL8 p2 and RARa exon 1. There was no significant association of SLAM or RARa polymorphisms with disease status implying no role of these genes in determining resistance to PDV induced mortality, that could be detected with the available samples and the small number of polymorphisms indentified. However there was significant differentiation of allele frequencies among populations. PDV and other morbilliviruses are important models for wildlife epidemiology, host switches and viral evolution. Despite a negative result in this case, full sequencing of pinniped and other 'non-model' carnivore genomes will help in refining understanding the role of host genetics in disease susceptibility for these viruses
    The reintroduction of the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) into the Netherlands: hidden life revealed by noninvasive genetic monitoring
    Koelewijn, H.P. ; Pérez-Haro, M. ; Jansman, H.A.H. ; Boerwinkel, M.C. ; Bovenschen, J. ; Lammertsma, D.R. ; Niewold, F.J.J. ; Kuiters, A.T. - \ 2010
    Conservation Genetics 11 (2010)2. - ISSN 1566-0621 - p. 601 - 614.
    natural-populations - individual identification - conservation genetics - spatial-organization - microsatellite loci - genotyping feces - eastern germany - dna - size - biology
    The last recorded presence of the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) in the Netherlands dates from 1989 and concerned a dead individual. In 2002 a reintroduction programme was started, and between June 2002 and April 2008 a total of 30 individuals (10 males and 20 females) were released into a lowland peat marsh in the north of the Netherlands. Noninvasive genetic monitoring based on the genetic profiles obtained from DNA extracted from otter faeces (spraints) was chosen for the post-release monitoring of the population. To this end, the founding individuals were genotyped before release and spraints were collected in the release area each winter from 2002 to 2008. From June 2002 to April 2008 we analysed the genetic profile of 1,265 spraints on the basis of 7–15 microsatellite loci, 582 of which (46%) were successfully assigned to either released or newly identified genotypes. We identified 54 offspring (23 females and 31 males): the females started to reproduce after 2 years and the males after 4 years. The mating and reproductive success among males was strongly skewed, with a few dominant males fathering two-thirds of the offspring, but the females had a more even distribution. The effective population size (Ne) was only about 30% of the observed density (N), mainly because of the large variance in reproductive success among males. Most juvenile males dispersed to surrounding areas on maturity, whereas juvenile females stayed inside the area next to the mother’s territory. The main cause of mortality was traffic accidents. Males had a higher mortality rate (22 out of 41 males (54%) vs. 9 out of 43 females (21%)). During winter 2007/08 we identified 47 individuals, 41 of which originated from mating within the release area. This study demonstrates that noninvasive molecular methods can be used efficiently in post-release monitoring studies of elusive species to reveal a comprehensive picture of the state of the population
    An assessment of the European pig diversity using molecular markers: partitioning of diversity among breeds
    Ollivier, L. ; Alderson, L. ; Gandini, G.C. ; Foulley, J.L. ; Haley, C.S. ; Joosten, R. ; Rattink, A.P. ; Harlizius, B. ; Groenen, M.A.M. - \ 2005
    Conservation Genetics 6 (2005)5. - ISSN 1566-0621 - p. 729 - 741.
    dierveredeling - varkens - varkensrassen - genetische diversiteit - genetische merkers - microsatellieten - moleculaire genetica - cryopreservering - kruising - conservering - uitsterven - rasverschillen - biodiversiteit - aflp - animal breeding - pigs - pig breeds - genetic diversity - genetic markers - microsatellites - molecular genetics - cryopreservation - crossbreds - conservation - extinction - breed differences - biodiversity - amplified fragment length polymorphism - subdivided populations - conservation genetics - livestock breeds - cattle breeds - management - distance - purposes - size
    Genetic diversity within and between breeds (and lines) of pigs was investigated. The sample comprised 68 European domestic breeds (and lines), including 29 local breeds, 18 varieties of major international breeds, namely Duroc, Hampshire, Landrace, Large White and Piétrain, and 21 commercial lines either purebred or synthetic, to which the Chinese Meishan and a sample of European wild pig were added. On average 46 animals per breed were sampled (range 12–68). The genetic markers were microsatellites (50 loci) and AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism, 148 loci). The analysis of diversity showed that the local breeds accounted for 56% of the total European between-breed microsatellite diversity, and slightly less for AFLP, followed by commercial lines and international breeds. Conversely, the group of international breeds contributed most to within-breed diversity, followed by commercial lines and local breeds. Individual breed contributions to the overall European between- and within-breed diversity were estimated. The range in between-breed diversity contributions among the 68 breeds was 0.04–3.94% for microsatellites and 0.24–2.94% for AFLP. The within-breed diversity contributions varied very little for both types of markers, but microsatellite contributions were negatively correlated with the between-breed contributions, so care is needed in balancing the two types of contribution when making conservation decisions. By taking into account the risks of extinction of the 29 local breeds, a cryopreservation potential (priority) was estimated for each of them.
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