Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Reconstructing the effects of fishing on life-history evolution in North Sea plaice Pleuronectes platessa
    Mollet, F.M. ; Dieckmann, U. ; Rijnsdorp, A.D. - \ 2016
    Marine Ecology Progress Series 542 (2016). - ISSN 0171-8630 - p. 195 - 208.
    fisheries-induced evolution - eco-genetic model - reproductive investment - maturation reaction norms
    Growing evidence suggests that fishing may induce rapid contemporary evolution in certain life-history traits. This study analyzes fisheries-induced changes in life-history traits describing growth, maturation, and reproduction, using an individual-based eco-genetic model that captures both the population dynamics and changes in genetic trait values. The model was successfully calibrated to match the observed life-history traits of female North Sea plaice Pleuronectes platessa around the years 1900 and 2000. On this basis, we report the following findings. First, the model indicates changes in 3 evolving life-history traits: the intercept of the maturation reaction norm decreases by 27%, the weight-specific reproductive-investment rate increases by 10%, and the weight-specific energy-acquisition rate increases by 1%. Together, these changes
    reduce the weight at maturation by 46% and the asymptotic body weight by 28% relative to the intensification of fishing around 1900. Second, while the maturation reaction norm and reproductive- investment rate change monotonically over time, the energy-acquisition rate follows a more complex course: after an initial increase during the first 50 yr, it remains constant for about 30 yr and then starts to decline. Third, our analysis indicates that North Sea plaice has not yet attained a new evolutionary equilibrium: it must be expected to evolve further towards earlier maturation, increased reproductive investment, and lower adult body size. Fourth, when fishing continues in our model 100 yr into the future, the pace of evolution slows down for the maturation reaction norm and the rate of en ergy acquisition, whereas no such slowing down is expected for the rate of
    reproductive investment
    Evolutionary impact assessment: accounting for evolutionary consequences of fishing in an ecosystem approach to fisheries management
    Laugen, A.T. ; Engelhard, G.H. ; Whitlock, R. ; Mollet, F.M. ; Rijnsdorp, A.D. - \ 2014
    Fish and Fisheries 15 (2014)1. - ISSN 1467-2960 - p. 65 - 96.
    cod gadus-morhua - maturation reaction norms - effective population-size - life-history evolution - north-sea plaice - pike esox-lucius - herring clupea-harengus - eco-genetic model - atlantic cod - marine fish
    Managing fisheries resources to maintain healthy ecosystems is one of the main goals of the ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF). While a number of international treaties call for the implementation of EAF, there are still gaps in the underlying methodology. One aspect that has received substantial scientific attention recently is fisheries-induced evolution (FIE). Increasing evidence indicates that intensive fishing has the potential to exert strong directional selection on life-history traits, behaviour, physiology, and morphology of exploited fish. Of particular concern is that reversing evolutionary responses to fishing can be much more difficult than reversing demographic or phenotypically plastic responses. Furthermore, like climate change, multiple agents cause FIE, with effects accumulating over time. Consequently, FIE may alter the utility derived from fish stocks, which in turn can modify the monetary value living aquatic resources provide to society. Quantifying and predicting the evolutionary effects of fishing is therefore important for both ecological and economic reasons. An important reason this is not happening is the lack of an appropriate assessment framework. We therefore describe the evolutionary impact assessment (EvoIA) as a structured approach for assessing the evolutionary consequences of fishing and evaluating the predicted evolutionary outcomes of alternative management options. EvoIA can contribute to EAF by clarifying how evolution may alter stock properties and ecological relations, support the precautionary approach to fisheries management by addressing a previously overlooked source of uncertainty and risk, and thus contribute to sustainable fisheries.
    Can fisheries-induced evolution shift reference points for fisheries management?
    Heino, M. ; Baulier, L. ; Boukal, D.S. ; Mollet, F.M. ; Rijnsdorp, A.D. - \ 2013
    ICES Journal of Marine Science 70 (2013)4. - ISSN 1054-3139 - p. 707 - 721.
    cod gadus-morhua - north-sea plaice - life-history evolution - exploited fish stocks - pleuronectes-platessa l - eco-genetic model - atlantic cod - population-dynamics - reproductive investment - natural mortality
    Biological reference points are important tools for fisheries management. Reference points are not static, but may change when a population's environment or the population itself changes. Fisheries-induced evolution is one mechanism that can alter population characteristics, leading to “shifting” reference points by modifying the underlying biological processes or by changing the perception of a fishery system. The former causes changes in “true” reference points, whereas the latter is caused by changes in the yardsticks used to quantify a system's status. Unaccounted shifts of either kind imply that reference points gradually lose their intended meaning. This can lead to increased precaution, which is safe, but potentially costly. Shifts can also occur in more perilous directions, such that actual risks are greater than anticipated. Our qualitative analysis suggests that all commonly used reference points are susceptible to shifting through fisheries-induced evolution, including the limit and “precautionary” reference points for spawning-stock biomass, Blim and Bpa, and the target reference point for fishing mortality, F0.1. Our findings call for increased awareness of fisheries-induced changes and highlight the value of always basing reference points on adequately updated information, to capture all changes in the biological processes that drive fish population dynamics.
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