Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Bioavailability of folic acid from fortified pasteurised and UHT-treated milk in humans
    Jong, R.J. ; Verwei, M. ; West, C.E. ; Vliet, T. van; Siebelink, E. ; Berg, H. van den; Castenmiller, J.J.M. - \ 2005
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 59 (2005)8. - ISSN 0954-3007 - p. 906 - 913.
    folate-binding-protein - plasma homocysteine concentrations - neural-tube defects - methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase - food fortification - vascular-disease - common mutation - dietary-folate - risk factor - cows milk
    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether milk fortified with folic acid enhances the folate status of humans and whether the presence of folate-binding proteins (FBP) in pasteurised milk affects the bioavailability of folic acid from fortified milk. In untreated and pasteurised milk, folate occurs bound to FBP, while FBP is (partly) denatured in ultra-high-temperature (UHT)-treated milk. The effect of FBP on folate bioavailability is still unclear. Design, subjects and setting Healthy, free-living subjects (n=69) aged 18-49 y participated in a 4-week double-blind, placebo-controlled dietary intervention study. Intervention In addition to a fully controlled diet, the subjects consumed each day 500 ml of pasteurised or UHT milk, either fortified or not with 200 g folic acid. Results Consumption of fortified milk increased folate concentrations in serum and in red blood cells (RBC) by 6.6-7.0 nmol/l (P
    Folic acid and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in fortified milk are bioaccessible as determined in a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model
    Verwei, M. ; Arkbåge, K. ; Havenaar, R. ; Berg, H. van den; Witthöft, C. ; Schaafsma, G. - \ 2003
    The Journal of Nutrition 133 (2003)7. - ISSN 0022-3166 - p. 2377 - 2383.
    folate-binding-protein - neural-tube defects - red-cell folate - cows milk - plasma homocysteine - small-intestine - dietary-folate - bovine-milk - bioavailability - prevention
    Dairy products are a potential matrix for folate fortification to enhance folate consumption in the Western world. Milk folate-binding proteins (FBP) are especially interesting because they seem to be involved in folate bioavailability. In this study, folate bioaccessibility was investigated using a dynamic computer-controlled gastrointestinal model [TNO gastrointestinal model (TIM)]. We used both ultrahigh temperature (UHT)-processed milk and pasteurized milk, differing in endogenous FBP concentrations and fortified with folic acid or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-CH3-H(4)folate). To study FBP stability during gastrointestinal passage and the effect of additional FBP on folate bioaccessibility, FBP-fortified UHT and pasteurized milk products were also tested. Folate bioaccessibility and FBP stability were measured by taking samples along the compartments of the gastrointestinal model and measuring their folate and FBP concentrations. Folate bioaccessibility from folic acid-fortified milk products without additional FBP was 58-61%. This was lower (P <0.05) than that of the 5-CH3-H(4)folate-fortified milk products (71%). Addition of FBP reduced (P <0.05) folate bioaccessibility from folic acid-fortified milk (44-51%) but not from 5-CH3-H(4)folate-fortified milk products (72%). The residual FBP levels in the folic acid- and 5-CH3-H(4)folate-fortified milk products after gastrointestinal passage were 13-16% and 0-1%, respectively, of the starting amounts subjected to TIM. In conclusion, milk seems to be a suitable carrier for folate, because both folic acid and 5-CH3-H(4)folate are easily released from the matrix and available for absorption. However, our results suggest that folic acid remains partly bound to FBP during passage through the small intestine, which reduces the bioaccessibility of folic acid from milk in this model.
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