Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Functional Divergence of Two Secreted Immune Proteases of Tomato
    Ilyas, M. ; Hörger, A.C. ; Bozkurt, T.O. ; Burg, H.A. van den; Kaschani, F. ; Kaiser, M. ; Belhaj, K. ; Smoker, M. ; Joosten, M. ; Kamoun, S. ; Hoorn, R.A.L. van der - \ 2015
    Current Biology 25 (2015)17. - ISSN 0960-9822 - p. 2300 - 2306.
    cf-2-dependent disease resistance - pathogen effectors - transcription factors - provides insights - genome sequence - plant-pathogens - gene - defense - target - specialization
    Rcr3 and Pip1 are paralogous secreted papain-like proteases of tomato. Both proteases are inhibited by Avr2 from the fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum, but only Rcr3 acts as a co-receptor for Avr2 recognition by the tomato Cf-2 immune receptor [ 1, 2, 3 and 4]. Here, we show that Pip1-depleted tomato plants are hyper-susceptible to fungal, bacterial, and oomycete plant pathogens, demonstrating that Pip1 is an important broad-range immune protease. By contrast, in the absence of Cf-2, Rcr3 depletion does not affect fungal and bacterial infection levels but causes increased susceptibility only to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Rcr3 and Pip1 reside on a genetic locus that evolved over 36 million years ago. These proteins differ in surface-exposed residues outside the substrate-binding groove, and Pip1 is 5- to 10-fold more abundant than Rcr3. We propose a model in which Rcr3 and Pip1 diverged functionally upon gene duplication, possibly driven by an arms race with pathogen-derived inhibitors or by coevolution with the Cf-2 immune receptor detecting inhibitors of Rcr3, but not of Pip1.
    Novel introner-like elements in fungi are involved in parallel gains of spliceosomal introns
    Collemare, J. ; Beenen, H.G. ; Crous, P.W. ; Wit, P.J.G.M. de; Burgt, A. van der - \ 2015
    PLoS ONE 10 (2015)6. - ISSN 1932-6203 - 12 p.
    daphnia populations - maximum-likelihood - evolution - gene - positions - conservation - selection - sequence - genomes
    Spliceosomal introns are key components of the eukaryotic gene structure. Although they contributed to the emergence of eukaryotes, their origin remains elusive. In fungi, they might originate from the multiplication of invasive introns named Introner-Like Elements (ILEs). However, so far ILEs have been observed in six fungal species only, including Fulvia fulva and Dothistroma septosporum (Dothideomycetes), arguing against ILE insertion as a general mechanism for intron gain. Here, we identified novel ILEs in eight additional fungal species that are phylogenetically related to F. fulva and D. septosporum using PCR amplification with primers derived from previously identified ILEs. The ILE content appeared unique to each species, suggesting independent multiplication events. Interestingly, we identified four genes each containing two gained ILEs. By analysing intron positions in orthologues of these four genes in Ascomycota, we found that three ILEs had inserted within a 15 bp window that contains regular spliceosomal introns in other fungal species. These three positions are not the result of intron sliding because ILEs are newly gained introns. Furthermore, the alternative hypothesis of an inferred ancestral gain followed by independent losses contradicts the observed degeneration of ILEs. These observations clearly indicate three parallel intron gains in four genes that were randomly identified. Our findings suggest that parallel intron gain is a phenomenon that has been highly underestimated in ILE-containing fungi, and likely in the whole fungal kingdom.
    Robustness to chronic heat stress in laying hens: a meta-analysis
    Mignon-Grasteau, S. ; Moreri, U. ; Narcy, A. ; Rousseau, X. ; Rodenburg, T.B. ; Tixier-Boichard, M. ; Zerjal, T. - \ 2015
    Poultry Science 94 (2015)4. - ISSN 0032-5791 - p. 586 - 600.
    high ambient-temperatures - egg quality - naked neck - vitamin-c - performance - dwarf - gene - supplementation - management - nutrition
    Chronic heat is a major stress factor in laying hens and many studies on the effect of heat stress have been published. It remains difficult, however, to draw general conclusions about the effect of chronic heat stress on performance and its relationship with genetic and environmental factors, as these studies have been done under varying experimental conditions and using various experimental designs. A meta-analysis enabled us to make a quantitative review of the results from 131 published papers. The relative effects of four factors (genotype, age, group size, and amplitude of temperature variation) and their interactions with temperature were analyzed for 13 traits. After pre-correcting the data for a random study effect, the best model for each trait was selected in a stepwise procedure based on its residual sum of squares. Shell strength, daily feed intake, egg mass, and hen-day egg production were found to be more sensitive to heat stress than the other traits as they dropped by 9.0 to 22.6% between thermo-neutrality (15 to 20°C) and heat stress (30 to 35°C) while yolk and albumen proportions or Haugh units showed nearly no variation with temperature (
    Control of oriented cell division in the Arabidopsis embryo
    Dop, M. van; Liao, C.Y. ; Weijers, D. - \ 2015
    Current Opinion in Plant Biology 23 (2015). - ISSN 1369-5266 - p. 25 - 30.
    preprophase band organization - plant development - transcription factor - monopteros - gene - root - differentiation - morphogenesis - cytokinesis - proteins
    Multicellular plant development requires strict control of cell division orientation. A key unanswered question is how developmental regulators interact with the generic cell division machinery to trigger oriented divisions. We discuss the Arabidopsis embryo as a model for addressing this question. Recent progress in 3D imaging and computation now allows sketching of a framework for the developmental control of division orientation in which the signaling molecule auxin controls oriented division by preventing a geometrically defined default plane. We expect that the identification of auxin effectors, together with the identification of novel regulators of cell division will help to link developmental regulators to the division machinery.
    Tumour necrosis factor allele variants and their association with the occurrence and severity of malaria in African children: a longitudinal study
    Gichohi-Wainaina, W.N. ; Boonstra, A. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Demir, A.Y. ; Veenemans, J. ; Verhoef, H. - \ 2015
    Malaria Journal 14 (2015). - ISSN 1475-2875 - 11 p.
    plasmodium-falciparum malaria - tnf-alpha promoter - cerebral malaria - linkage disequilibrium - rheumatoid-arthritis - diabetes-mellitus - polymorphisms - gene - disease - hla
    Background Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is central to the immune response to Plasmodium infection. Its plasma concentration is influenced by allele variants in the promoter region of TNF. The study’s objectives were to assess TNF allele variants (TNF-1031 , TNF-308 ): (1) modulation of malaria rates in young Tanzanian children; (2) modulation of the severity of malaria as indicated by haemoglobin concentrations at the time of presentation with febrile episodes; and (3) the association between Plasmodium infection and haemoglobin concentration in symptomless parasite carriers. Methods Data from a placebo-controlled trial in which 612 Tanzanian children aged 6–60 months with height-for-age z-score in the range -3 SD to 1.5 SD was utilised. Those with Plasmodium infection at baseline were treated with artemether-lumefantrine. An episode of malaria was predefined as current Plasmodium infection with an inflammatory response (axillary temperature =37.5°C or whole blood C-reactive protein concentration =8 mg/L) in children reported sick. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) pattern assessment as well as haplotype analysis was conducted using HAPLOVIEW. Cox regression models used in the primary analysis accounted for multiple episodes per child. Results Genotyping of 94.9% (581/612) children for TNF-1031 (TNF-1031 T>C); allele frequency was 0.39. Corresponding values for rs1800629 (TNF-308 G>A) were 95.4% (584/612) and 0.17. Compared to the wild type genotype (TT), malaria rates were increased in the TNF-1031 CC genotype (hazard ratio, HR [95% CI]: 1.41 [1.01¿1.97] and 1.31 [0.97¿1.76] for crude analysis and adjusting for pre-specified baseline factors, respectively) but decreased in those with the TNF-308 AA genotype (corresponding HR: 0.13 [0.02¿0.63] and 0.16 [0.04¿0.67]). These associations were weaker when analysing first episodes of malaria (P value -0.59 and 0.38, respectively). No evidence that allele variants of TNF-1031 and TNF-308 affected haemoglobin concentration at first episode of malaria, or that they modified the association between Plasmodium infection and haemoglobin concentrations at baseline was observed.
    Immune activation mediated by the late blight resistance protein R1 requires nuclear localization of R1 and AVR1
    Du, Y. ; Berg, J. ; Govers, F. ; Bouwmeester, K. - \ 2015
    New Phytologist 207 (2015)3. - ISSN 0028-646X - p. 735 - 747.
    disease-resistance - phytophthora-infestans - arabidopsis-thaliana - innate immunity - plant immunity - receptor - recognition - potato - gene - component
    Resistance against oomycete pathogens is mainly governed by intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) receptors that recognize matching avirulence (AVR) proteins from the pathogen, RXLR effectors that are delivered inside host cells. Detailed molecular understanding of how and where NLR proteins and RXLR effectors interact is essential to inform the deployment of durable resistance (R) genes. Fluorescent tags, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and nuclear export signals (NESs) were exploited to determine the subcellular localization of the potato late blight protein R1 and the Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector AVR1, and to target these proteins to the nucleus or cytoplasm. Microscopic imaging revealed that both R1 and AVR1 occurred in the nucleus and cytoplasm, and were in close proximity. Transient expression of NLS- or NES-tagged R1 and AVR1 in Nicotiana benthamiana showed that activation of the R1-mediated hypersensitive response and resistance required localization of the R1/AVR1 pair in the nucleus. However, AVR1-mediated suppression of cell death in the absence of R1 was dependent on localization of AVR1 in the cytoplasm. Balanced nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of AVR1 seems to be a prerequisite. Our results show that R1-mediated immunity is activated inside the nucleus with AVR1 in close proximity and suggest that nucleocytoplasmic transport of R1 and AVR1 is tightly regulated.
    Remarkably divergent regions punctuate the genome assembly of the Caenorhabditis elegans Hawaiian strain CB4856
    Thompson, O.A. ; Snoek, L.B. ; Nijveen, H. ; Sterken, M.G. ; Volkers, R.J.M. ; Brenchley, R. ; Hof, A. van 't; Bevers, R.P.J. ; Cossins, A.R. ; Yanai, I. ; Hajnal, A. ; Schmid, T. ; Perkins, J.D. ; Spencer, D. ; Kruglyak, L. ; Andersen, E.C. ; Moerman, D.G. ; Hillier, L.W. ; Kammenga, J.E. ; Waterston, R.H. - \ 2015
    Genetics 200 (2015)3. - ISSN 0016-6731 - p. 975 - 989.
    natural variation data - c. elegans - arabidopsis-thaliana - gene - polymorphism - populations - diversity - nematodes - dna - evolutionary
    The Hawaiian strain (CB4856) of Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most divergent from the canonical laboratory strain N2 and has been widely used in developmental, population and evolutionary studies. To enhance the utility of the strain, we have generated a draft sequence of the CB4856 genome, exploiting a variety of resources and strategies. The CB4856 genome when compared against the N2 reference has 327,050 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and 79,529 insertion-deletion events (indels) that result in a total of 3.3 megabasepairs (Mb) of N2 sequence missing from CB4856 and 1.4 Mb of sequence present in CB4856 not present in N2. As previously reported, the density of SNVs varies along the chromosomes, with the arms of chromosomes showing greater average variation than the centers. In addition, we find 61 regions totaling 2.8 Mb, distributed across all six chromosomes, that have a greatly elevated SNV density, ranging from 2% to 16% SNVs. A survey of other wild isolates show that the two alternative haplotypes for each region are widely distributed, suggesting they have been maintained by balancing selection over long evolutionary times. These divergent regions contain an abundance of genes from large rapidly evolving families encoding F-box, MATH, BATH, seven-transmembrane G-coupled receptors, and nuclear hormone receptors suggesting that they provide selective advantages in natural environments. The draft sequence makes available a comprehensive catalog of sequence differences between the CB4856 and N2 strains that will facilitate the molecular dissection of their phenotypic differences. Our work also emphasizes the importance of going beyond simple alignment of reads to a reference genome when assessing differences between genomes.
    Systemic Regulation of RAS/MAPK Signaling by the Serotonin Metabolite 5-HIAA
    Schmid, T. ; Snoek, L.B. ; Fröhli, E. ; Bent, M.L. van der; Kammenga, J.E. ; Hajnal, A. - \ 2015
    Plos Genetics 11 (2015)5. - ISSN 1553-7404 - 16 p.
    caenorhabditis-elegans - c-elegans - natural variation - vulvar induction - complex disease - receptor - protein - gene - kinase - activation
    Human cancer is caused by the interplay of mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and inherited variations in cancer susceptibility genes. While many of the tumor initiating mutations are well characterized, the effect of genetic background variation on disease onset and progression is less understood. We have used C. elegans genetics to identify genetic modifiers of the oncogenic RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. Quantitative trait locus analysis of two highly diverged C. elegans isolates combined with allele swapping experiments identified the polymorphic monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene amx-2 as a negative regulator of RAS/MAPK signaling. We further show that the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), which is a product of MAOA catalysis, systemically inhibits RAS/MAPK signaling in different organs of C. elegans. Thus, MAOA activity sets a global threshold for MAPK activation by controlling 5-HIAA levels. To our knowledge, 5-HIAA is the first endogenous small molecule that acts as a systemic inhibitor of RAS/MAPK signaling.
    Effect of the DGAT1 K232A genotype of dairy cows on the milk metabolome and proteome
    Lu, J. ; Boeren, S. ; Hooijdonk, A.C.M. van; Vervoort, J.J.M. ; Hettinga, K.A. - \ 2015
    Journal of Dairy Science 98 (2015)5. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 3460 - 3469.
    h-1-nmr spectroscopy - sample preparation - identification - stomatin - membrane - proteins - gene - cattle - yield
    Diglyceride O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of triglycerides from diglycerides and acyl-coenzyme A. The DGAT1 K232A polymorphism was previously shown to have a significant influence on bovine milk production characteristics (milk yield, protein content, fat content, and fatty acid composition). The mechanism of this influence has, however, not been elucidated. In this study, metabolomics (1H-nuclear magnetic resonance) and proteomics (laser chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) were applied to determine the serum and lipid metabolite composition and milk fat globule membrane proteome of milk samples from cows with the DGAT1 KK and AA genotypes. The milk samples from cows with the DGAT1 KK genotype contained more stomatin, sphingomyelin, choline, and carnitine, and less citrate, creatine or phosphocreatine, glycerol-phosphocholine, mannose-like sugar, acetyl sugar phosphate, uridine diphosphate (UDP)-related sugar, and orotic acid compared with milk samples from cows with the DGAT1 AA genotype. Based on these results, we propose that the differences between the DGAT1 genotypes may be related to stomatin-sphingomyelin lipid rafts as well as structural (cell membrane) differences in epithelial cells of the mammary gland. In conclusion, our study shows that, in addition to previously described changes in triglyceride composition, cows differing in DGAT1 polymorphism differ in their milk proteome and metabolome, which may help in further understanding the effect of the DGAT1 K232A polymorphism on milk production characteristics.
    Molecular cloning and characterization of the trichome specificchrysanthemyl diphosphate/chrysanthemol synthase promoter fromTanacetum cinerariifolium
    Sultana, S. ; Hu, H. ; Gao, L. ; Mao, J. ; Luo, J. ; Jongsma, M.A. ; Wang, C. - \ 2015
    Scientia Horticulturae 185 (2015). - ISSN 0304-4238 - p. 193 - 199.
    mosaic virus-35s promoter - artemisia-annua - transcription factor - diphosphate synthase - pyrethrin biosynthesis - transgene expression - plant transformation - glandular trichomes - gene - cinerariaefolium
    Natural pyrethrins accumulate to high concentrations in the flower achenes of pyrethrum (Tanacetumcinerariifolium). They are extracted from dried flowers and widely used as a natural pesticide. Chrysanthe-mol synthase (CHS) is the first key enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins. In this work, a 1128 bp TcCHSpromoter fragment was cloned from pyrethrum genomic DNA. The sequence contained cis-elementspredicted to be responsive to different hormones, light, and environmental stresses. To characterizethe promoter it was fused to the reporter genes green fluorescent protein (GFP) and -glucuronidase(GUS), and respectively transformed into florist’s chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium ‘1581’)and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). GFP fluorescence in florist’s chrysanthemum ‘1581’and GUS staining oftobacco showed that the TcCHS promoter was exclusively expressed in the glandular secretory trichomes(GSTs) of both plant species. The findings will support research on factors influencing the accumulationof pyrethrins, and can be used for trichome-specific metabolic engineering of plants to ensure minimaladverse effects on plant growth and development.
    The cell size distribution of tomato fruit can be changed by overexpression of CDKA1
    Czerednik, A. ; Busscher, M. ; Angenent, G.C. ; Maagd, R.A. de - \ 2015
    Plant Biotechnology Journal 13 (2015)2. - ISSN 1467-7644 - p. 259 - 268.
    cyclin-dependent kinase - lycopersicon-esculentum mill - plant development - arabidopsis - endoreduplication - growth - gene - expression - division - dna
    Tomato is one of the most cultivated vegetables in the world and an important ingredient of the human diet. Tomato breeders and growers face a continuous challenge of combining high quantity (production volume) with high quality (appearance, taste and perception for the consumers, processing quality for the processing industry). To improve the quality of tomato, it is important to understand the regulation of fruit development and of fruit cellular structure, which is in part determined by the sizes and numbers of cells within a tissue. The role of the cell cycle therein is poorly understood. Plant cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are homologues of yeast cdc2, an important cell cycle regulator conserved throughout all eukaryotes. CDKA1 is constitutively expressed during the cell cycle and has dual functions in S- and M-phase progression. We have produced transgenic tomato plants with increased expression of CDKA1 under the control of the fruit-specific TPRP promoter, which despite a reduced number of seeds and diminished amount of jelly, developed fruits with weight and shape comparable to that of wild-type fruits. However, the phenotypic changes with regard to the pericarp thickness and placenta area were remarkable. Fruits of tomato plants with the highest expression of CDKA1 had larger septa and columella (placenta), compared with wild-type fruits. Our data demonstrate the possibility of manipulating the ratio between cell division and expansion by changing the expression of a key cell cycle regulator and probably its activity with substantial effects on structural traits of the harvested fruit.
    Natural loss-of-function mutation of EDR1 conferring resistance to tomato powdery mildew in Arabidopsis thaliana accession C24
    Gao, D. ; Appiano, M. ; Huibers, R.P. ; Loonen, A.E.H.M. ; Visser, R.G.F. ; Wolters, A.M.A. ; Bai, Y. - \ 2015
    Molecular Plant Pathology 16 (2015)1. - ISSN 1464-6722 - p. 71 - 82.
    salicylic-acid - downy mildew - gene - defense - plants - microsatellites - mechanism - evolution - cloning - kinase
    To screen for potentially novel types of resistance to tomato powdery mildew Oidium neolycopersici, a disease assay was performed on 123 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. Forty accessions were fully resistant, and one, C24, was analysed in detail. By quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of an F2 population derived from C24 × Sha (susceptible accession), two QTLs associated with resistance were identified in C24. Fine mapping of QTL-1 on chromosome 1 delimited the region to an interval of 58¿kb encompassing 15 candidate genes. One of these was Enhanced Disease Resistance 1 (EDR1). Evaluation of the previously obtained edr1 mutant of Arabidopsis accession Col-0, which was identified because of its resistance to powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum, showed that it also displayed resistance to O.¿neolycopersici. Sequencing of EDR1 in our C24 germplasm (referred to as C24-W) revealed two missing nucleotides in the second exon of EDR1 resulting in a premature stop codon. Remarkably, C24 obtained from other laboratories does not contain the EDR1 mutation. To verify the identity of C24-W, a DNA region containing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) unique to C24 was sequenced showing that C24-W contains the C24-specific nucleotide. C24-W showed enhanced resistance to O.¿neolycopersici compared with C24 not containing the edr1 mutation. Furthermore, C24-W displayed a dwarf phenotype, which was not associated with the mutation in EDR1 and was not caused by the differential accumulation of pathogenesis-related genes. In conclusion, we identified a natural edr1 mutant in the background of C24.
    Characterization of apoptosis in PER.C6® batch and perfusion cultures
    Mercier, S.M. ; Diepenbroek, B. ; Martens, D.E. ; Wijffels, R.H. ; Streefland, M. - \ 2015
    Biotechnology and Bioengineering 112 (2015)3. - ISSN 0006-3592 - p. 569 - 578.
    hamster ovary cells - high-level expression - flow-cytometry - line per.c6 - death - adenovirus - dna - vaccine - gene - manufacture
    Preventing or delaying cell death is a challenge in mammalian cell cultures for the development and optimization of production processes for biopharmaceuticals. Cell cultures need to be maintained highly viable for extended times in order to reach maximum production yields. Moreover, programmed cell death through apoptosis is often believed to occur without being detected by classical viability measurements. In this study, we characterized cell death in PER.C6® batch and perfusion cultures using three flow cytometry techniques measuring different steps of the apoptosis cascade: DNA fragmentation, caspases activation and phosphatidylserine externalization. We showed that apoptosis is the main pathway of PER.C6® cell death in batch cultures after depletion of main carbon sources. In high cell density perfusion cultures fed at a constant specific perfusion rate, both high viability and very limited apoptosis were observed. When extending this perfusion process far beyond standard operations, cultures were exposed to suboptimal process conditions, which resulted in an increase of apoptotic cell death. Moreover, we showed that the reference viability measurement using trypan blue exclusion properly assesses the level of cell death in PER.C6® cultures. This study is a first step in understanding the mechanisms of PER.C6® cell death, which will be helpful to support applications of the cell line.
    Population structure and pathotype diversity of the wheat blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae 25 years after its emergence in Brazil
    Nunes Maciel, J.L. ; Ceresini, P. ; Castroagudin, V.L. ; Zala, M. ; Kema, G.H.J. - \ 2014
    Phytopathology 104 (2014)1. - ISSN 0031-949X - p. 95 - 107.
    mating-type distribution - pyricularia-grisea - mycosphaerella-graminicola - genotypic diversity - fertility status - growth-stages - rice - resistance - gene - recombination
    Since its first report in Brazil in 1985, wheat blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph: Pyricularia oryzae), has become increasingly important in South America, where the disease is still spreading. We used 11 microsatellite loci to elucidate the population structure of the wheat blast pathogen in wheat fields in central-western, southeastern, and southern Brazil. No subdivision was found among the wheat-infecting populations, consistent with high levels of gene flow across a large spatial scale. Although the clonal fraction was relatively high and the two mating type idiomorphs (MAT1-1 and MAT1-2) were not at similar frequencies, the clone-corrected populations from Distrito Federal and Goiás, Minas Triangle, and São Paulo were in gametic equilibrium. Based on these findings, we propose that populations of the wheat blast pathogen exhibit a mixed reproductive system in which sexual reproduction is followed by the local dispersal of clones. Seedling virulence assays with local wheat cultivars differentiated 14 pathotypes in the current population. Detached head virulence assays differentiated eight virulence groups on the same wheat cultivars. There was no correlation between seedling and head reaction
    KORRIGAN1 Interacts Specifically with Integral Components of the Cellulose Synthase Machinery
    Mansoori Zangir, N. ; Timmers, J.F.P. ; Desprez, T. ; Lessa Alvim Kamei, C. ; Dees, D.C.T. ; Vincken, J.P. ; Visser, R.G.F. ; Höfte, H. ; Vernhettes, S. ; Trindade, L.M. - \ 2014
    PLoS ONE 9 (2014)11. - ISSN 1932-6203
    secondary cell-wall - arabidopsis-thaliana - endo-1,4-beta-glucanase - expression - membranes - protein - system - plants - gene - endo-1,4-beta-d-glucanase
    Cellulose is synthesized by the so called rosette protein complex and the catalytic subunits of this complex are the cellulose synthases (CESAs). It is thought that the rosette complexes in the primary and secondary cell walls each contains at least three different non-redundant cellulose synthases. In addition to the CESA proteins, cellulose biosynthesis almost certainly requires the action of other proteins, although few have been identified and little is known about the biochemical role of those that have been identified. One of these proteins is KORRIGAN (KOR1). Mutant analysis of this protein in Arabidopsis thaliana showed altered cellulose content in both the primary and secondary cell wall. KOR1 is thought to be required for cellulose synthesis acting as a cellulase at the plasma membrane–cell wall interface. KOR1 has recently been shown to interact with the primary cellulose synthase rosette complex however direct interaction with that of the secondary cell wall has never been demonstrated. Using various methods, both in vitro and in planta, it was shown that KOR1 interacts specifically with only two of the secondary CESA proteins. The KOR1 protein domain(s) involved in the interaction with the CESA proteins were also identified by analyzing the interaction of truncated forms of KOR1 with CESA proteins. The KOR1 transmembrane domain has shown to be required for the interaction between KOR1 and the different CESAs, as well as for higher oligomer formation of KOR1.
    Accuracy of genomic prediction when combining two related crossbred populations
    Vallee, A.A.A. ; Arendonk, J.A.M. van; Bovenhuis, H. - \ 2014
    Journal of Animal Science 92 (2014)10. - ISSN 0021-8812 - p. 4342 - 4348.
    dairy-cattle breeds - beef-cattle - selection - performance - animals - values - uterine - traits - impact - gene
    Charolais bulls are selected for their crossbreed performance when mated to Montbéliard or Holstein dams. To implement genomic prediction, one could build a reference population for each crossbred population independently. An alternative could be to combine both crossbred populations into a single reference population to increase size and accuracy of prediction. The objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of genomic prediction by combining different crossbred populations. Three scenarios were considered: 1) using 1 crossbred population as reference to predict phenotype of animals from the same crossbred population, 2) combining the 2 crossbred populations into 1 reference to predict phenotype of animals from 1 crossbred population, and 3) using 1 crossbred population as reference to predict phenotype of animals from the other crossbred population. Traits studied were bone thinness, height, and muscular development. Phenotypes and 45,117 SNP genotypes were available for 1,764 Montbéliard × Charolais calves and 447 Holstein × Charolais calves. The population was randomly spilt into 10 subgroups, which were assigned to the validation one by one. To allow fair comparison between scenarios, size of the reference population was kept constant for all scenarios. Breeding values were estimated with BLUP and genomic BLUP. Accuracy of prediction was calculated as the correlation between the EBV and the phenotypic values of the calves in the validation divided by the square root of the heritability. Genomic BLUP showed higher accuracies (between 0.281 and 0.473) than BLUP (between 0.197 and 0.452). Accuracies tended to be highest when prediction was within 1 crossbred population, intermediate when populations were combined into the reference population, and lowest when prediction was across populations. Decrease in accuracy from a prediction within 1 population to a prediction across populations was more pronounced for bone thinness (–27%) and height (–29%) than for muscular development (–14%). Genetic correlation between the 2 crossbred populations was estimated using pedigree relationships. It was 0.70 for bone thinness, 0.80 for height, and 0.99 for muscular development. Genetic correlation indicates the expected gain in accuracy of prediction when combining different populations into 1 reference population. The larger the genetic correlation is, the larger the benefit is to combine populations for genomic prediction.
    Precise control of plant stem cell activity through parallel regulatory inputs
    Bennett, T. ; Toorn, A. van; Willemsen, V. ; Scheres, B. - \ 2014
    Development 141 (2014). - ISSN 0950-1991 - p. 4055 - 4064.
    arabidopsis-thaliana root - transcription factor - shoot apex - meristem - gene - differentiation - organization - maintenance - homeostasis - sombrero
    The regulation of columella stem cell activity in the Arabidopsis root cap by a nearby organizing centre, the quiescent centre, has been a key example of the stem cell niche paradigm in plants. Here, we investigate interactions between transcription factors that have been shown to regulate columella stem cells using a simple quantification method for stem cell activity in the root cap. Genetic and expression analyses reveal that the RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED protein, the FEZ and SOMBRERO NAC-domain transcription factors, the ARF10 and ARF16 auxin response factors and the quiescent centre-expressed WOX5 homeodomain protein each provide independent inputs to regulate the number of columella stem cells. Given the tight control of columella development, we found that these inputs act in a surprisingly parallel manner. Nevertheless, important points of interaction exist; for example, we demonstrate the repression of SMB activity by non-autonomous action of WOX5. Our results suggest that the developmental progression of columella stem cells may be quantitatively regulated by several more broadly acting transcription factors rather than by a single intrinsic stem cell factor, which raises questions about the special nature of the stem cell state in plants.
    Toolkit for Visualization of the Cellular Structure and Organelles in Aspergillus niger
    Buren, E.B.J. ten; Karrenbelt, M.A.P. ; Lingemann, M. ; Chordia, S. ; Deng, Y. ; Hu, J.J. ; Verest, J.M. ; Wu, V. ; Bello Gonzalez, T.D.G. ; Heck, R.G.A. van; Odoni, D.I. ; Schonewille, T. ; Straat, L. van der; Graaff, L.H. de; Passel, M.W.J. van - \ 2014
    ACS synthetic biology 3 (2014)12. - ISSN 2161-5063 - p. 995 - 998.
    gene - hyphae
    Aspergillus niger is a filamentous fungus that is extensively used in industrial fermentations for protein expression and the production of organic acids. Inherent biosynthetic capabilities, such as the capacity to secrete these biomolecules in high amounts, make A. niger an attractive production host. Although A. niger is renowned for this ability, the knowledge of the molecular components that underlie its production capacity, intercellular trafficking processes and secretion mechanisms is far from complete. Here, we introduce a standardized set of tools, consisting of an N-terminal GFP-actin fusion and codon optimized eforRed chromoprotein. Expression of the GFP-actin construct facilitates visualization of the actin filaments of the cytoskeleton, whereas expression of the chromoprotein construct results in a clearly distinguishable red phenotype. These experimentally validated constructs constitute the first set of standardized A. niger biomarkers, which can be used to study morphology, intercellular trafficking, and secretion phenomena.
    REDUCED DORMANCY5 Encodes a Protein Phosphatase 2C That Is Required for Seed Dormancy in Arabidopsis
    Xiang, Y. ; Nakabayashi, K. ; Ding, J. ; He, F. ; Bentsink, L. ; Soppe, W.J.J. - \ 2014
    The Plant Cell 26 (2014)11. - ISSN 1040-4651 - p. 4362 - 4375.
    rna-binding proteins - abscisic-acid - messenger-rna - pp2c phosphatases - germination - thaliana - aba - reveals - gene - mutants
    Seed dormancy determines germination timing and contributes to crop production and the adaptation of natural populations to their environment. Our knowledge about its regulation is limited. In a mutagenesis screen of a highly dormant Arabidopsis thaliana line, the reduced dormancy5 (rdo5) mutant was isolated based on its strongly reduced seed dormancy. Cloning of RDO5 showed that it encodes a PP2C phosphatase. Several PP2C phosphatases belonging to clade A are involved in abscisic acid signaling and control seed dormancy. However, RDO5 does not cluster with clade A phosphatases, and abscisic acid levels and sensitivity are unaltered in the rdo5 mutant. RDO5 transcript could only be detected in seeds and was most abundant in dry seeds. RDO5 was found in cells throughout the embryo and is located in the nucleus. A transcriptome analysis revealed that several genes belonging to the conserved PUF family of RNA binding proteins, in particular Arabidopsis PUMILIO9 (APUM9) and APUM11, showed strongly enhanced transcript levels in rdo5 during seed imbibition. Further transgenic analyses indicated that APUM9 reduces seed dormancy. Interestingly, reduction of APUM transcripts by RNA interference complemented the reduced dormancy phenotype of rdo5, indicating that RDO5 functions by suppressing APUM transcript levels.
    Expression of natural human b1,4-GalT1 variants and of non-mammalian homologues in plants leads to differences in galactosylation of N-glycans
    Hesselink, T. ; Rouwendal, G.J.A. ; Henquet, M.G.L. ; Florack, D.E.A. ; Helsper, J.P.F.G. ; Bosch, H.J. - \ 2014
    Transgenic Research 23 (2014)5. - ISSN 0962-8819 - p. 717 - 728.
    golgi-apparatus - murine beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase - beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase - transgenic plants - gene - cells - localization - antibodies - oligosaccharides - glycoproteins
    b1,4-Galactosylation of plant N-glycans is a prerequisite for commercial production of certain biopharmaceuticals in plants. Two different types of galactosylated N-glycans have initially been reported in plants as the result of expression of human b1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 (GalT). Here we show that these differences are associated with differences at its N-terminus: the natural short variant of human GalT results in hybrid type N-glycans, whereas the long form generates bi-antennary complex type N-glycans. Furthermore, expression of non-mammalian, chicken and zebrafish GalT homologues with N-termini resembling the short human GalT N-terminus also induce hybrid type N-glycans. Providing both non-mammalian GalTs with a 13 amino acid N-terminal extension that distinguishes the two naturally occurring forms of human GalT, acted to increase the levels of biantennary galactosylated N-glycans when expressed in tobacco leaves. Replacement of the cytosolic tail and transmembrane domain of chicken and zebrafish GalTs with the corresponding region of rat a2,6-sialyltransferase yielded a gene whose expression enhanced the level of bi-antennary galactosylation even further.
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