Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Selection against somatic parasitism can maintain allorecognition in fungi
    Czaran, T. ; Hoekstra, R.F. ; Aanen, D.K. - \ 2014
    Fungal Genetics and Biology 73 (2014). - ISSN 1087-1845 - p. 128 - 137.
    vegetative incompatibility - neurospora-crassa - kin discrimination - filamentous fungi - self-recognition - botryllus-schlosseri - marine-invertebrates - ascomycete fungi - cell parasitism - genetic-control
    Fusion between multicellular individuals is possible in many organisms with modular, indeterminate growth, such as marine invertebrates and fungi. Although fusion may provide various benefits, fusion usually is restricted to close relatives by allorecognition, also called heterokaryon or somatic incompatibility in fungi. A possible selective explanation for allorecognition is protection against somatic parasites. Such mutants contribute less to colony functions but more to reproduction. However, previous models testing this idea have failed to explain the high diversity of allorecognition alleles in nature. These models did not, however, consider the possible role of spatial structure. We model the joint evolution of allorecognition and somatic parasitism in a multicellular organism resembling an asexual ascomycete fungus in a spatially explicit simulation. In a 1000-by-1000 grid, neighbouring individuals can fuse, but only if they have the same allotype. Fusion with a parasitic individual decreases the total reproductive output of the fused individuals, but the parasite compensates for this individual-level fitness reduction by a disproportional share of the offspring. Allorecognition prevents the invasion of somatic parasites, and vice versa, mutation towards somatic parasitism provides the selective conditions for extensive allorecognition diversity. On the one hand, if allorecognition diversity did not build up fast enough, somatic parasites went to fixation; conversely, once parasites had gone to fixation no allorecognition diversity built up. On the other hand, the mere threat of parasitism could select for high allorecognition diversity, preventing invasion of somatic parasites. Moderate population viscosity combined with weak global dispersal was optimal for the joint evolution of allorecognition and protection against parasitism. Our results are consistent with the widespread occurrence of allorecognition in fungi and the low degree of somatic parasitism. We discuss the implications of our results for allorecognition in other organism groups.
    Applying modelling experiences from the past to shape crop systems biology : the need to converge crop physiology and functional genomics
    Yin, X. ; Struik, P.C. - \ 2008
    New Phytologist 179 (2008)3. - ISSN 0028-646X - p. 629 - 642.
    to-phenotype relationships - quantitative trait loci - in-silico plant - c-3 photosynthesis - genetic-control - flowering time - use efficiency - ecophysiological model - co2 concentrations - increase yield
    Functional genomics has been driven greatly by emerging experimental technologies. Its development as a scientific discipline will be enhanced by systems biology, which generates novel, quantitative hypotheses via modelling. However, in order to better assist crop improvement, the impact of developing functional genomics needs to be assessed at the crop level, given a projected diminishing effect of genetic alteration on phenotypes from the molecule to crop levels. This review illustrates a recently proposed research field, crop systems biology, which is located at the crossroads of crop physiology and functional genomics, and intends to promote communications between the two. Past experiences with modelling whole-crop physiology indicate that the layered structure of biological systems should be taken into account. Moreover, modelling not only plays a role in data synthesis and quantitative prediction, but certainly also in heuristics and system design. These roles of modelling can be applied to crop systems biology to enhance its contribution to our understanding of complex crop phenotypes and subsequently to crop improvement. The success of crop systems biology needs commitments from scientists along the entire knowledge chain of plant biology, from molecule or gene to crop and agro-ecosystem
    The role of cryptochrome 2 in flowering in Arabidopsis
    El-Assal, S.E.D. ; Alonso-Blanco, C. ; Peeters, A.J.M. ; Wagemaker, C. ; Weller, J.L. ; Koornneef, M. - \ 2003
    Plant Physiology 133 (2003)4. - ISSN 0032-0889 - p. 1504 - 1516.
    landsberg erecta - phytochrome-a - circadian clock - locus-c - genetic-control - time - thaliana - mutants - encodes - phenotype
    We have investigated the genetic interactions between cry2 and the various flowering pathways in relation to the regulation of flowering by photoperiod and vernalization. For this, we combined three alleles of CRY2, the wild-type CRY2-Landsberg erecta (Ler), a cry2 loss-of-function null allele, and the gain-of-function CRY2-Cape Verde Islands (Cvi), with mutants representing the various photoreceptors and flowering pathways. The analysis of CRY2 alleles combined with photoreceptor mutants showed that CRY2-Cvi could compensate the loss of phyA and cry1, also indicating that cry2 does not require functional phyA or cry1. The analysis of mutants of the photoperiod pathway showed epistasis of co and gi to the CRY2 alleles, indicating that cry2 needs the product of CO and GI genes to promote flowering. All double mutants of this pathway showed a photoperiod response very much reduced compared with Ler. In contrast, mutations in the autonomous pathway genes were additive to the CRY2 alleles, partially overcoming the effects of CRY2-Cvi and restoring day length responsiveness. The three CRY2 alleles were day length sensitive when combined with FRI-Sf2 and/or FLC-Sf2 genes, which could be reverted when the delay of flowering caused by FRI-Sf2 and FLC-Sf2 alleles was removed by vernalization. In addition, we looked at the expression of FLC and CRY2 genes and showed that CRY2 is negatively regulated by FLC. These results indicate an interaction between the photoperiod and the FLC-dependent pathways upstream to the common downstream targets of both pathways, SOC1 and FT.
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