Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

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Direct and Long-Term Metabolic Consequences of Lowly vs. Highly-Digestible Starch in the Early Post-Weaning Diet of Mice
Fernández-Calleja, José M.S. ; Bouwman, Lianne M.S. ; Swarts, Hans J.M. ; Oosting, Annemarie ; Keijer, Jaap ; Schothorst, Evert M. van - \ 2018
Nutrients 10 (2018)11. - ISSN 2072-6643
adipose tissue - amylopectin - amylose - C57BL mice - carbohydrates - glycemic index - indirect calorimetry - metabolic flexibility - nutrition - sexual dimorphism

Starches of low and high digestibility have different metabolic effects. Here, we examined whether this gives differential metabolic programming when fed in the immediate post-weaning period. Chow-fed mice were time-mated, and their nests were standardized and cross-fostered at postnatal days 1⁻2. After postnatal week (PW) 3, individually housed female and male offspring were switched to a lowly-digestible (LDD) or highly-digestible starch diet (HDD) for three weeks. All of the mice received the same high-fat diet (HFD) for nine weeks thereafter. Energy and substrate metabolism and carbohydrate fermentation were studied at the end of the HDD/LDD and HFD periods by extended indirect calorimetry. Glucose tolerance (PW 11) and metabolic flexibility (PW14) were analyzed. Directly in response to the LDD versus the HDD, females showed smaller adipocytes with less crown-like structures in gonadal white adipose tissue, while males had a lower fat mass and higher whole body fat oxidation levels. Both LDD-fed females and males showed an enlarged intestinal tract. Although most of the phenotypical differences disappeared in adulthood in both sexes, females exposed to LDD versus HDD in the early post-weaning period showed improved metabolic flexibility in adulthood. Cumulatively, these results suggest that the type of starch introduced after weaning could, at least in females, program later-life health.

Effect of a high-protein diet on maintenance of blood pressure levels achieved after initial weight loss: the DiOGenes randomized study
Engberink, M.F. ; Geleijnse, J.M. ; Bakker, S.J.L. ; Larsen, T. - \ 2015
Journal of Human Hypertension 29 (2015). - ISSN 0950-9240 - p. 58 - 63.
risk-factors - controlled-trial - glycemic index - obese women - supplementation - hypertension - overweight - markers - fat
Randomized trials have shown significant blood pressure (BP) reductions after increased protein compared with carbohydrate intake, but the effect on BP maintenance after initial weight loss is unclear. We examined the effect of a high-protein diet on the maintenance of reduced BP after weight loss in 420 overweight adults from the Diet, Obesity and Genes study. After an 8-week weight-loss period (>8% BW), subjects (42±6 years) were randomized to either a high-protein diet (23–28 en% protein) or a lower-protein control diet (10–15 en% protein) for 26 weeks. BMI after weight loss was 30.3±4.3¿kg¿m-2, BP was 118/73¿mm¿Hg and 28 subjects (6.5%) used antihypertensive agents. Systolic BP during 26 weeks of weight maintenance dietary intervention increased in both treatment groups, but it was 2.2¿mm¿Hg less (95% CI: -4.6 to 0.2¿mm¿Hg, P=0.08) in the high-protein group than in the lower-protein control group. In 191 (pre)hypertensive subjects (baseline systolic BP120¿mm¿Hg), a larger difference was observed (-4.2¿mm¿Hg (-7.7, -0.7), P=0.02). The effect was attenuated after adjustment for initial BP (-3.4¿mm¿Hg (-6.9, -0.03), P=0.048), and after additional adjustment for weight change (-2.7¿mm¿Hg (-6.1, 0.4), P=0.11). Adjustment for 24-h urinary excretion of sodium and potassium did not change the results. Diastolic BP yielded similar results. These findings suggest that a BP reduction after weight loss is better maintained when the intake of protein is increased at the expense of carbohydrates. This effect is partly mediated by body weight.
Dietary Fibre Intake and Risks of Cancers of the Colon and Rectum in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)
Murphy, N. ; Norat, T. ; Ferrari, P. ; Jenab, M. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, B. ; Skeie, G. ; Dahm, C.C. ; Overvad, K. ; Olsen, A. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Clavel-Chapelon, F. ; Boutron-Ruault, M.C. ; Racine, A. ; Kaaks, R. ; Teucher, B. ; Boeing, H. ; Bergmann, M.M. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Trichopoulos, D. ; Lagiou, P. ; Palli, D. ; Pala, V. ; Panico, S. ; Tumino, R. ; Vineis, P. ; Siersema, P. ; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Peeters, P.H.M. ; Hjartaker, A. ; Engeset, D. ; Gonzalez, C.A. ; Sanchez, M.J. ; Dorronsoro, M. ; Navarro, C. ; Ardanaz, E. ; Quiros, J.R. ; Sonestedt, E. ; Ericson, U. ; Nilsson, L. ; Palmqvist, R. ; Khaw, K.T. ; Wareham, N. ; Key, T.J. ; Crowe, F.L. ; Fedirko, V. ; Wark, P.A. ; Chuang, S.C. ; Riboli, E. - \ 2012
PLoS ONE 7 (2012)6. - ISSN 1932-6203
colorectal-cancer - nonstarch polysaccharides - epidemiologic evidence - measurement error - glycemic index - cohort - project - carbohydrate - calibration - protection
Background: Earlier analyses within the EPIC study showed that dietary fibre intake was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, but results from some large cohort studies do not support this finding. We explored whether the association remained after longer follow-up with a near threefold increase in colorectal cancer cases, and if the association varied by gender and tumour location. Methodology/Principal Findings: After a mean follow-up of 11.0 years, 4,517 incident cases of colorectal cancer were documented. Total, cereal, fruit, and vegetable fibre intakes were estimated from dietary questionnaires at baseline. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and centre, and adjusted for total energy intake, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, education, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptive use, and intakes of alcohol, folate, red and processed meats, and calcium. After multivariable adjustments, total dietary fibre was inversely associated with colorectal cancer (HR per 10 g/day increase in fibre 0.87, 95% CI: 0.79-0.96). Similar linear associations were observed for colon and rectal cancers. The association between total dietary fibre and risk of colorectal cancer risk did not differ by age, sex, or anthropometric, lifestyle, and dietary variables. Fibre from cereals and fibre from fruit and vegetables were similarly associated with colon cancer; but for rectal cancer, the inverse association was only evident for fibre from cereals. Conclusions/Significance: Our results strengthen the evidence for the role of high dietary fibre intake in colorectal cancer prevention.
Dietary Factors Impact on the Association between CTSS Variants and Obesity Related Traits
Hooton, H. ; Angquist, L. ; Holst, C. ; Hager, J. ; Rousseau, F. ; Hansen, R.D. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Roswall, N. ; Overvad, K. ; Saris, W.H.M. ; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2012
PLoS ONE 7 (2012)7. - ISSN 1932-6203 - 10 p.
cathepsin-k gene - low-fat diets - weight-loss - adipose-tissue - glycemic index - flip-flop - women - populations - protein - cancer
Background/Aims - Cathepsin S, a protein coded by the CTSS gene, is implicated in adipose tissue biology–this protein enhances adipose tissue development. Our hypothesis is that common variants in CTSS play a role in body weight regulation and in the development of obesity and that these effects are influenced by dietary factors–increased by high protein, glycemic index and energy diets. Methods - Four tag SNPs (rs7511673, rs11576175, rs10888390 and rs1136774) were selected to capture all common variation in the CTSS region. Association between these four SNPs and several adiposity measurements (BMI, waist circumference, waist for given BMI and being a weight gainer–experiencing the greatest degree of unexplained annual weight gain during follow-up or not) given, where applicable, both as baseline values and gain during the study period (6–8 years) were tested in 11,091 European individuals (linear or logistic regression models). We also examined the interaction between the CTSS variants and dietary factors–energy density, protein content (in grams or in % of total energy intake) and glycemic index–on these four adiposity phenotypes. Results - We found several associations between CTSS polymorphisms and anthropometric traits including baseline BMI (rs11576175 (SNP N°2), p = 0.02, ß = -0.2446), and waist change over time (rs7511673 (SNP N°1), p = 0.01, ß = -0.0433 and rs10888390 (SNP N°3), p = 0.04, ß = -0.0342). In interaction with the percentage of proteins contained in the diet, rs11576175 (SNP N°2) was also associated with the risk of being a weight gainer (pinteraction = 0.01, OR = 1.0526)–the risk of being a weight gainer increased with the percentage of proteins contained in the diet. Conclusion CTSS variants seem to be nominally associated to obesity related traits and this association may be modified by dietary protein intake.
Association between FTO variant and change in body weight and its interaction with dietary factors; the DiOGenes study
Vimaleswaran, K.S. ; Angquist, L. ; Hansen, R.D. ; A, D.L. van der; Bouatia-Naji, N. ; Holst, C. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Overvad, K. ; Jakobsen, M.U. ; Boeing, H. ; Meidtner, K. ; Palli, D. ; Masala, G. ; Saris, W.H.M. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Wareham, N.J. ; Sorensen, T.I.A. ; Loos, R.J.F. - \ 2012
Obesity 20 (2012)8. - ISSN 1930-7381 - p. 1669 - 1674.
genome-wide association - mass index - physical-activity - common variants - fat distribution - glycemic index - adult obesity - gene variants - mc4r - risk
Although FTO is an established obesity-susceptibility locus, it remains unknown whether it influences weight change in adult life and whether diet attenuates this association. Therefore, we investigated the association of FTO-rs9939609 with changes in weight and waist circumference (WC) during 6.8 years follow-up in a large-scale prospective study and examined whether these associations were modified by dietary energy percentage from fat, protein, carbohydrate, or glycemic index (GI). This study comprised data from five countries of European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and was designed as a case-cohort study for weight gain. Analyses included 11,091 individuals, of whom 5,584 were cases (age (SD), 47.6 (7.5) years), defined as those with the greatest unexplained annual weight gain during follow-up and 5,507 were noncases (48.0 (7.3) years), who were compared in our case-noncase (CNC) analyses. Furthermore, 6,566 individuals (47.9 (7.3) years) selected from the total sample (all noncases and 1,059 cases) formed the random subcohort (RSC), used for continuous trait analyses. Interactions were tested by including interaction terms in the models. In the RSC-analyses, FTO-rs9939609 was associated with BMI (ß (SE), 0.17 (0.08) kg·m-2/allele; P = 0.034) and WC (0.47 (0.21) cm/allele; P = 0.026) at baseline, but not with weight change (5.55 (12.5) g·year–1/allele; P = 0.66) during follow up. In the CNC-analysis, FTO-rs9939609 was associated with increased risk of being a weight-gainer (OR: 1.1; P = 0.045). We observed no interaction between FTO-rs9939609 and dietary fat, protein and carbohydrate, and GI on BMI and WC at baseline or on change in weight and WC. FTO-rs9939609 is associated with BMI and WC at baseline, but association with weight gain is weak and only observed for extreme gain. Dietary factors did not influence the associations.
26th Hohenheim Concensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims: Evidence-based nutrition
Biesalski, H.K. ; Aggett, P.J. ; Anton, R. ; Bernstein, P.S. ; Blumberg, J. ; Heaney, R.P. ; Henry, J. ; Nolan, J.M. ; Richardson, D.P. ; Ommen, B. van; Witkamp, R.F. ; Rijkers, G.T. ; Zollner, I. - \ 2011
Nutrition 27 (2011)10. - ISSN 0899-9007 - p. S1 - S20.
beta-carotene - macular degeneration - glycemic index - vitamin-e - cardiovascular-disease - blood-glucose - lung-cancer - risk-factor - biomarkers - damage
Objective The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. Methods and procedures The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term “Hohenheim Consensus Conference” defines conferences dealing with nutrition-related topics. The major aim of the conference is to review the state of the art of a given topic with experts from different areas (basic science, clinicians, epidemiologists, etc.). Based on eight to 12 questions, the experts discuss short answers and try to come to a consensus. A scientifically based text is formulated that justifies the consensus answer. To discuss the requirements for the scientific substantiation of claims, the 26th Hohenheim Consensus Conference gathered the views of many academic experts in the field of nutritional research and asked these experts to address the various aspects of a claims substantiation process and the possibilities and limitations of the different approaches. Results The experts spent a day presenting and discussing their views and arrived at several consensus statements that can serve as guidance for bodies performing claims assessments in the framework of regulatory systems. Conclusion The 26th Hohenheim Consensus Conference addresses some general aspects and describes the current scientific status from the point of view of six case studies to illustrate specific areas of scientific interest: carotenoids and vitamin A in relation to age-related macular degeneration, the quality of carbohydrates (as expressed by the glycemic index) in relation to health and well-being, probiotics in relation to intestinal and immune functions, micronutrient intake and maintenance of normal body functions, and food components with antioxidative properties and health benefits
Dietary determinants of changes in waist circumference adjusted for body mass index - a proxy measure of visceral adiposity
Romaguera, D. ; Angquist, L. ; Huaidong, D.U. ; Jakobsen, M.U. ; Forouhi, N.G. ; Halkjaer, J. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; A, D.L. van der; Masala, G. ; Steffen, A. ; Palli, D. ; Wareham, N. ; Overvad, K. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Boeing, H. ; Riboli, E. ; Sorensen, T. - \ 2010
PLoS ONE 5 (2010)7. - ISSN 1932-6203 - 7 p.
epic-oxford participants - middle-aged men - glycemic index - abdominal adiposity - subsequent changes - european men - physical-activity - alcohol-consumption - insulin-resistance - energy density
Background Given the recognized health effects of visceral fat, the understanding of how diet can modulate changes in the phenotype “waist circumference for a given body mass index (WCBMI)”, a proxy measure of visceral adiposity, is deemed necessary. Hence, the objective of the present study was to assess the association between dietary factors and prospective changes in visceral adiposity as measured by changes in the phenotype WCBMI. Methods and Findings We analyzed data from 48,631 men and women from 5 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Anthropometric measurements were obtained at baseline and after a median follow-up time of 5.5 years. WCBMI was defined as the residuals of waist circumference regressed on body mass index, and annual change in WCBMI (¿WCBMI, cm/y) was defined as the difference between residuals at follow-up and baseline, divided by follow-up time. The association between energy, energy density (ED), macronutrients, alcohol, glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), fibre and ¿WCBMI was modelled using centre-specific adjusted linear regression, and random-effects meta-analyses to obtain pooled estimates. Men and women with higher ED and GI diets showed significant increases in their WCBMI, compared to those with lower ED and GI [1 kcal/g greater ED predicted a ¿WCBMI of 0.09 cm (95% CI 0.05 to 0.13) in men and 0.15 cm (95% CI 0.09 to 0.21) in women; 10 units greater GI predicted a ¿WCBMI of 0.07 cm (95% CI 0.03 to 0.12) in men and 0.06 cm (95% CI 0.03 to 0.10) in women]. Among women, lower fibre intake, higher GL, and higher alcohol consumption also predicted a higher ¿WCBMI. Conclusions Results of this study suggest that a diet with low GI and ED may prevent visceral adiposity, defined as the prospective changes in WCBMI. Additional effects may be obtained among women of low alcohol, low GL, and high fibre intake.
Dietary Patterns and Glucose Tolerance Abnormalities in Chinese Adults
He, Y. ; Ma, G. ; Zhai, F. ; Li, Y. ; Hu, Y. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Yang, X. - \ 2009
Diabetes Care 32 (2009)11. - ISSN 0149-5992 - p. 1972 - 1976.
diabetes-mellitus - food-consumption - glycemic index - meat intake - type-2 - risk - women - men - fat - perspective
OBJECTIVE To investigate the association of the dietary pattern with the presence of newly diagnosed glucose tolerance abnormalities among Chinese adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 20,210 adults aged 45–69 years from the 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey were included. Information on dietary intake was collected using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Factor analysis and cluster analysis were used to identify the food factors and dietary pattern clusters. RESULTS Four dietary pattern clusters were identified (“Green Water,” “Yellow Earth,” “Western Adopter,” and “New Affluence”). The prevalence of glucose tolerance abnormalities ranged from 3.9% in the Green Water to 8.0% in the New Affluence. After adjustment for area, age, sex, current smoking, and physical activity, subjects in the Yellow Earth cluster (prevalence ratio 1.22 [95% CI 1.04–1.43]) and New Affluence cluster (2.05 [1.76–2.37]) had significantly higher prevalence rates compared with those for the Green Water cluster. After further adjustment for BMI and waist-to-height ratio, the elevated risk in the New Affluence remained statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS Dietary patterns and food factors are associated with the presence of glucose tolerance abnormalities in China, even independent of obesity. A New Affluence diet is an important modifiable risk factor, which needs attention from the prevention point of view
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